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Daniel Clowes // Fantagraphics
Daniel Clowes // Fantagraphics

The 4 Most Interesting Comics of the Week

Daniel Clowes // Fantagraphics
Daniel Clowes // Fantagraphics

Every week I write about the most interesting new comics hitting comic shops, bookstores, digital, and the web. Feel free to comment below if there's a comic you've read recently that you want to talk about or an upcoming comic that you'd like me to consider highlighting.

1. PATIENCE

By Daniel Clowes
Fantagraphics

Daniel Clowes // Fantagraphics

Sure to be one of the biggest releases of 2016, Patience is Daniel Clowes’s first graphic novel in six years and, at 180 pages, his longest to date. It’s also a somewhat unexpected leap into science fiction by a writer whose best known works, such as Ghost World, tend to be grounded satires about dejected outsiders. That’s not to say it is unusual for Clowes to dabble in different genres, be it horror (Like A Velvet Glove Cast in Iron), noir (David Boring) or even superheroes (The Death-Ray), but he always does it with his lugubrious yet funny spin, drawn in his iconically retro-'60s style.

Patience follows a young man named Jack whose only joy in life is his pregnant wife Patience. One day, he comes home from his usual day of pretending to have a job to find her dead. After initially being charged with the crime and then absolved, he obsesses over who could have murdered her for the next 20 years. When he finds a man who has invented a time machine, he now has the chance to go back and prevent Patience and his unborn baby from being taken away from him.

With his single-minded focus on changing his past, older Jack is like a lug-headed, psychopathic action hero in this story, but the book is truly about its title character, Patience. She is a tragic but assertive player in her own narrative. This is going to be up there in Clowes’s oeuvre of great works, but for fans of good time travel yarns, it deserves its spot in that canon as well.

2. INTERNATIONAL IRON MAN #1

By Brian Michael Bendis and Alex Maleev
Marvel Comics

Marvel Comics // Brian Michael Bendis and Alex Maleev

Brian Michael Bendis and Alex Maleev's 50+ issue run on Daredevil in the early 2000s is considered one of the definitive takes on that character. Now, the creative team has reunited to do the same for Iron Man with a new series, International Iron Man, that intends to explore Tony Stark’s past and his place in the “All New All Different” Marvel.

Stark recently learned that he had been adopted as a baby, and the identity of his birth parents is unknown. In this series, he’ll be searching for clues to his past, but he’ll also be exploring this slightly altered Marvel Universe for clues to its own secret history, accompanied by a key, mysterious figure in the post-Secret Wars Marvel universe: Victor Von Doom, who appears to be a longtime friend of Tony now.

Bendis and Maleev are a formidable comics team and, despite his popularity when played on screen by Robert Downey, Jr., Iron Man is in need of a good, definitive take on the character. His original Cold War-centric origins have been recalibrated to Marvel’s rolling timeline, so we’ll be seeing some flashbacks to a grungy, college-age Tony partying in the 1990s in this first issue.

3. RETROFIT 2016 KICKSTARTER

By Box Brown, Jared Smith, and various cartoonists
Kickstarter


Kaeleigh Forsyth and Alabaster Pizzo

Kickstarter

Small press publisher Retrofit began its life with a Kickstarter in 2011 with the goal of setting up a subscription mail service for their modest line of floppy-style comics. Now, nearly 50 comics and graphic novels later, the well-regarded publisher is taking to Kickstarter again to fund their 2016 line. The money they raise is intended to aid in printing costs and also in order to give more upfront money to the artists. They have some pretty impressive-looking books planned for this year, with a selection of indie cartoonists with unique voices like James Kolchaka, Leela Corman, Alabaster Pizzo, Kaeleigh Forsyth, and Eleanor Davis. Both digital and print subscriptions are available at different reward levels.

4. THROUGH THE HABITRAILS: LIFE BEFORE AND AFTER MY CAREER IN THE CUBICLES

By Jeff Nicholson
Dover Publications

Jeff Nicholson // Dover Publications

Jeff Nicholson first began serializing his dark office cubicle comic, Through the Habitrails, in 1989 in a comics anthology magazine called Taboo, which was edited by comics veteran Stephen Bissette. By 1992, he had released 14 individual, stand-alone installments that fit together as a complete graphic novel, but the definitive edition has never been published together—until now.

Nicholson’s comic is sort of like Dilbert if it had been written by Franz Kafka. It's a depiction of a corporate office where workers toil away while hooked up to machines that drain them of their creative juices, which are then used to power the gerbils that seem to run the company. The nameless hero of the story tries many times to escape his imprisonment only to find himself trapped even further.

This collected edition features an introduction and history of the comic by Bissette as well as a brief introduction by famed comics writer Matt Fraction. Nicholson, who retired from comics in 2004, provides some of his own context with an afterword.

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BEHROUZ MEHRI/AFP/Getty Images
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10 Amazing Facts About Stan Lee
BEHROUZ MEHRI/AFP/Getty Images
BEHROUZ MEHRI/AFP/Getty Images

Comic book legend Stan Lee’s life has always been an open book. The co-creator of some of the greatest superheroes and most beloved stories of all time has become just as mythical and larger-than-life as the characters in the panels. In 2015, around the time of Marvel’s 75th anniversary, Lee had the idea to reflect on his own life, as he said, “in the one form it has never been depicted, as a comic book … or if you prefer, a graphic memoir.”

The result, published by the Touchstone imprint of Simon & Schuster in 2015, was Amazing Fantastic Incredible: A Marvelous Memoir—which was written by Lee with Peter David and features artwork by cartoonist and illustrator Colleen Doran. Here are 10 things we learned about Lee, on his 95th birthday.

1. HIS WIFE IS ALSO HIS BARBER.

As a bit of a throwaway fact, Stanley Martin Lieber (Stan Lee) reveals the secret of his slicked back mane on the second page of his memoir. “My whole adult life, I’ve never been to a barber,” he writes. “Joanie always cuts my hair.”

2. HIS CONFIDENCE COMES FROM HIS MOTHER.

Amazing Fantastic IncredibleCourtesy POW! Entertainment[2].jpg

Stan Lee writes that as a child he loved to read books by Mark Twain, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Jules Verne, H.G. Wells, and others, and his mother often watched him read. “I probably got my self-confidence from the fact that my mother thought everything I did was brilliant.”

3. YOUNG STAN LEE WROTE OBITUARIES.

Before writing about the fantastic lives of fictional characters, Stan Lee wrote antemortem obituaries for celebrities at an undisclosed news office in New York. He says that he eventually quit that job because it was too “depressing.”

4. CAPTAIN AMERICA WAS HIS FIRST BIG BREAK.

A week into his job at Timely Comics, Lee got the opportunity to write a two-page Captain America comic. He wrote it under the pen name Stan Lee (now his legal name) and titled it "Captain America Foils the Traitor’s Revenge." His first full comic script would come in Captain America Issue 5, published August 1, 1941.

5. HE WROTE TRAINING FILMS FOR THE ARMY WITH DR. SEUSS.

After being transferred from the army’s Signal Corps in New Jersey, Lee worked as a playwright in the Training Film Division in Queens with eight other men, including a few who went on to be very famous: Pulitzer Prize-winning author William Saroyan, cartoonist Charles Addams (creator of The Addams Family), director Frank Capra (Mr. Smith Goes to Washington [1939] and It’s a Wonderful Life [1946]) and Theodor Geisel, better known as Dr. Seuss.

6. HE DEFIED THE COMICS CODE AUTHORITY WITH AN ANTI-DRUG COMIC.

In 1971, Lee received a letter from the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare asking him to put an anti-drug message in one of his books. He came up with a Spider-Man story that involved his best friend Harry abusing pills because of a break-up. The CCA would not approve the story with their seal because of the mention of drugs, but Lee convinced his publisher, Martin Goodman, to run the comic anyway.

7. AN ISSUE AT THE PRINTERS TURNED THE HULK GREEN.

The character was supposed to be gray, but Lee writes that the printer had a hard time keeping the color consistent. “So as of issue #2,” Lee writes, “with no explanation, he turned green.”

8. HIS WIFE DESTROYED HIS PRIZED TYPEWRITER.


Rich Polk/Getty Images for Entertainment Weekly

According to Lee, during an argument, Joanie destroyed the typewriter he used to write the first issues for characters including Spider-Man and The Fantastic Four. “This happened before eBay," he writes. "Too bad. I could’ve auctioned the parts and made a mint.”

9. A FIRE DESTROYED HIS INTERVIEWS AND LECTURES.

When Lee moved his family to Los Angeles, he set up a studio in Van Nuys where he stored videotapes of his talks and interviews, along with a commissioned bust of his wife. The building was lost to a blaze that the fire department believed was arson, but no one was ever charged with the crime.

10. HIS FAVORITE MARVEL FILM CAMEO WAS BASED ON ONE FROM THE COMICS.

Beginning with the first Spider-Man film in 2002, Stan Lee has made quick cameos in Marvel films as a service to the fans. He says that his appearance in Fantastic Four: Rise of the Silver Surfer (2007) was inspired by the story of Reed and Sue Richards’ wedding in Fantastic Four Annual Volume 1 #3, in which he and artist/writer Jack Kirby attempt to crash the ceremony but are thwarted.

All images courtesy of Touchstone unless otherwise noted.

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Space Goat Publishing
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These Evil Dead 2 Comics Will Look Groovy on Your Bookshelf
Space Goat Publishing
Space Goat Publishing

Bruce Campbell has been quoted as saying the gallons of fake blood poured into his face during filming of the 1987 cult classic horror film Evil Dead 2: Dead by Dawn led to a week of red-tinged mucus leaking out of his nostrils. Fortunately, no Campbells were harmed in the making of two new comic collections from Space Goat Productions that are now being funded on Kickstarter. The Evil Dead 2 Omnibus features over 300 pages of stories set in the Necronomicon-plagued universe featured in numerous comic book miniseries; The Art of Evil Dead 2 reveals never-before-seen production art from both the comics and ancillary projects.

The campaign is the latest from Space Goat, the Bellingham, Washington-based company that’s made a cottage (or cabin) industry from products spinning out of the Sam Raimi-directed film, which is celebrating its 30th anniversary this year. In addition to the new collections, the publisher has also issued an Evil Dead 2 coloring book; a comic where Campbell’s demon-fighting hero, Ash Williams, encounters Adolf Hitler; and a forthcoming board game where players can navigate Deadite threats while shaking their head at Ash’s questionable competency. (No matter the iteration, he seems ill-equipped to deal with the threat of his own possessed and lopped-off hand.)

According to Space Goat publisher Shon Bury, licensing the Evil Dead 2 property from rights holders StudioCanal in 2015 has been a buoy in navigating the difficult waters of comic book publishing. (Even Marvel, which rakes in billions through its film franchises, struggles to sell more than 60,000 to 70,000 copies of its most popular monthly titles.) One day into its Kickstarter launch, the Evil Dead titles had reached 50 percent of their $20,000 funding goal.

“It’s definitely our flagship on the publishing side,” Bury tells Mental Floss. “The board game is our top seller in the Evil Dead category, and the coloring book sells really well. They’re our evergreen products.”

The cover to 'The Art of Evil Dead 2' from Space Goat Publishing
Space Goat Publishing

Exploring Ash’s adventures in other media comes with a few caveats. While Space Goat is free to explore the characters and situations portrayed in Evil Dead 2, incorporating ideas from the rest of the series (including 1993’s Army of Darkness or the Starz series Ash vs. Evil Dead) is generally off-limits. And while the StudioCanal rights include a likeness of Campbell, the actor has veto power over how he’s depicted on the page. “For some reason, he doesn’t like the dimple on his chin to be drawn,” Bury says. “But he’s very insistent that the scar on his face from the movie is always there.”

Other actors featured in the film—like Richard Domeier, the future home-shopping host who portrayed “Evil Ed”—may not have granted their likeness rights, but his Deadite character design is part of the deal. “You want to inoculate the owner or licensor of the rights,” Bury says. “So we submit drawings and they might say, ‘No, too close to the actor.’”

That development process is part of what makes up The Art of Evil Dead 2, one-half of Space Goat’s current Kickstarter project that follows a successful Evil Dead 2 board game launch in 2016. The campaigns, Bury says, help target Ash fans with material that might not get enough attention if it were released directly to retailers. “Kickstarter is basically social media. It’s direct engagement, our way of saying to fans, ‘Hey, you’re really going to like this.’”

Bury expects fans to be just as enthused about Evil Dead 2: The Doppelganger Wars, a limited series due for release in 2018 that sees Ash and sidekick Annie Knowby enter the mirror dimension glimpsed at in Evil Dead 2 to discover the true origins of both the demon-summoning Necronomicon and the cult surrounding it. A meeting with H.P. Lovecraft may also be on deck, along with other narratives that would carry the license through the end of the publisher’s current agreement with StudioCanal in late 2019.

Still to be decided: whether Ash will ever encounter the werewolves of The Howling, Space Goat’s latest horror license. “Those conversations have occurred,” Bury says. “It would be a natural. But it’s also challenging because the royalties [for the licenses] double.” 

Digital versions of The Art of Evil Dead 2 and the Evil Dead Omnibus will be available to backers pledging $20 beginning in December. Softcover, hardcover, and Necronomicon slipcase editions ($30 and up) ship in May 2018. The Kickstarter runs through November 25.

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