If March 15 Is the Ides of March, What Does That Make March 16?

iStock.com/bycostello
iStock.com/bycostello

Everyone knows that the soothsayer in William Shakespeare's Julius Caesar was talking about March 15 when he warned the Roman emperor to "beware the Ides of March." We also all know Caesar's response: "Nah, I gotta head into the office that day." But if March 15 is the Ides of March, what does that make March 16?

At the time of Caesar's assassination, Romans were using the Julian calendar (introduced by Julius Caesar himself). This was a modified version of the original Roman calendar, and it is very similar to the one we use today (which is called the Gregorian calendar). A major difference, however, was how Romans talked about the days.

Each month had three important dates: the Kalends (first day of the month), the Ides (the middle of the month), and the Nones (ninth day before the Ides, which corresponded with the first phase of the Moon). Instead of counting up (i.e., March 10, March 11, March 12), Romans kept track by counting backwards and inclusively from the Kalends, Ides, or Nones. March 10 was the sixth day before the Ides of March, March 11 was the fifth day before the Ides of March, and so on.

Because it came after the Ides, March 16 would’ve been referred to in the context of April: "The 17th day before the Kalends of April." The abbreviated form of this was a.d. XVII Kal. Apr., with "a.d." standing for ante diem, meaning roughly "the day before."

So, had Julius Caesar been murdered on March 16, the soothsayer's ominous warning would have been, "Beware the 17th day before the Kalends of April." Doesn't have quite the same ring to it.

This story first ran in 2016.

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You Can Now Buy Your Own Harry Potter Invisibility Cloak 

Daniel Radcliffe in Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone (2001).
Daniel Radcliffe in Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone (2001).
Warner Bros.

Harry Potter fans, prepare to go nuts. Toy group Wow! Stuff has officially come out with an invisibility cloak and pre-orders begin on July 1.

According to CNET, the cloak works like a green screen and uses an app to show the wearer disappearing in photos and videos. The user can then save the photos and videos to their phone and show everyone their vanishing skills. The toy company felt compelled to warn users that they won't actually disappear, which is hilarious but worth clarifying in case someone thought they now had access to invisibility cloaks and real magic.

The creators actually examined the original cloak used on Daniel Radcliffe in Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, now housed at Leavesden Studio, to make sure it was as close to the real one as possible.

The cloak, which is not transparent to the wearer, comes in two different versions: The standard cloak costs $70 and includes a stand to situate one’s phone for pictures. The deluxe version, which costs $80, has a serpent-themed border and a tabletop tripod so you can really go wild with photos.

The cloaks are set for an August 1 release, and have already made an impression on toy lovers, winning Innovative Toy of the Year at Sweden’s Toy Awards.

[h/t CNET]

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