If March 15 Is the Ides of March, What Does That Make March 16?

iStock.com/bycostello
iStock.com/bycostello

Everyone knows that the soothsayer in William Shakespeare's Julius Caesar was talking about March 15 when he warned the Roman emperor to "beware the Ides of March." We also all know Caesar's response: "Nah, I gotta head into the office that day." But if March 15 is the Ides of March, what does that make March 16?

At the time of Caesar's assassination, Romans were using the Julian calendar (introduced by Julius Caesar himself). This was a modified version of the original Roman calendar, and it is very similar to the one we use today (which is called the Gregorian calendar). A major difference, however, was how Romans talked about the days.

Each month had three important dates: the Kalends (first day of the month), the Ides (the middle of the month), and the Nones (ninth day before the Ides, which corresponded with the first phase of the Moon). Instead of counting up (i.e., March 10, March 11, March 12), Romans kept track by counting backwards and inclusively from the Kalends, Ides, or Nones. March 10 was the sixth day before the Ides of March, March 11 was the fifth day before the Ides of March, and so on.

Because it came after the Ides, March 16 would’ve been referred to in the context of April: "The 17th day before the Kalends of April." The abbreviated form of this was a.d. XVII Kal. Apr., with "a.d." standing for ante diem, meaning roughly "the day before."

So, had Julius Caesar been murdered on March 16, the soothsayer's ominous warning would have been, "Beware the 17th day before the Kalends of April." Doesn't have quite the same ring to it.

This story first ran in 2016.

This Vincent Van Gogh Action Figure Comes Complete with Removable Ears

Today Is Art Day, Amazon
Today Is Art Day, Amazon

Historians still don’t know how Vincent van Gogh lost his left ear, or for that matter, how much of it was actually lopped off. However, as Bored Panda reports, Today Is Art Day decided to take historic liberties in the name of nerdy fun and created a mini van Gogh action figure, complete with two completely detachable ears.

Today Is Art Day developed a prototype of the 5-inch PVC figurine back in 2017, and to bring it to the art-loving masses, they launched a Kickstarter campaign. Backers who contributed $28 Canadian dollars (around $21 USD) scored their own van Gogh action figure.

A van Gogh action figure next to a miniature 'Starry Night' painting
Today Is Art Day, Amazon

A boxed Vincent van Gogh action figure
Today Is Art Day, Amazon

Fans who missed out on the Kickstarter the first time around can buy one on Amazon now for $24. He even comes in a box decorated with miniature, cut-out replicas of his Sunflowers (1888) and The Starry Night (1889).

Today Is Art Day has since branched out to produce a whole host of other figurines based on famous icons, from other artists like Frida Kahlo and Gustav Klimt to scientific luminaries like Nikola Tesla and Albert Einstein.

[h/t Bored Panda]

A version of this article first ran in 2017. It has been updated to reflect current availability.

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