Vincent van Gogh, "Sunflowers" (1889) Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons
Vincent van Gogh, "Sunflowers" (1889) Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

This Van Gogh Flower Painting May Soon Be Restored (But Should It Be?)

Vincent van Gogh, "Sunflowers" (1889) Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons
Vincent van Gogh, "Sunflowers" (1889) Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

To ensure that important works of art are around for future generations, conservators are sometimes tasked with figuring out how to turn back the clock. When handled by professionals, restoration can significantly extend the life of rare and priceless artifacts (though sometimes the process doesn't go as planned, and there are unfortunate results). The Art Newspaper reports that one of Vincent Van Gogh’s paintings, Sunflowers (1889), has been taken off display at The Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam to be conserved and possibly restored to bring its colors closer to their original brilliance.

The conservators are deciding whether it would be safe to remove a coating of varnish from the painting's surface that was likely added in 1927, more than three decades after the painting's completion. Because of its age, the varnish has developed a brownish tint; according to The Art Newspaper , the yellow pigments used by Van Gogh have also deteriorated "due to a photochemical reaction that takes place when chrome yellows are exposed to light."

Art restoration has been referred to as a balance between art and science, but it's still a controversial field that not everyone believes is necessary. In 1985, Yuriko Saito wrote an article in The Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism that explored the desire to restore art and considered arguments from both sides: restoring “aesthetic appeal” versus sacrificing legitimacy with new paint and materials applied by someone who is not the original artist. Conservators at other institutions have been experimenting with noninvasive alternatives for restoring art, including the Harvard Art Museum's use of digital projection technology to restore Mark Rothko murals that date back to the 1960s.

According to The Art Newspaper, Sunflowers will go back on display on March 24, after which conservators will use what they learned during their investigation to decide whether the restoration will move forward.

[h/t The Art Newspaper]

Art
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YouTube/Great Big Story
See the Secret Paintings Hidden in Gilded Books
YouTube/Great Big Story
YouTube/Great Big Story

The art of vanishing fore-edge painting—hiding delicate images on the front edges of gilded books—dates back to about 1660. Today, British artist Martin Frost is the last remaining commercial fore-edge painter in the world. He works primarily on antique books, crafting scenes from nature, domestic life, mythology, and Harry Potter. Great Big Story recently caught up with him in his studio to learn more about his disappearing art. Learn more in the video below.

nextArticle.image_alt|e
Mathew Tucciarone
Candytopia, the Interactive Art Installation Made of Sweet Treats, Is Coming to New York City
Mathew Tucciarone
Mathew Tucciarone

A colorful exhibition is sharing some eye candy—and actual candy—with visitors. The sweet art pop-up, called Candytopia, is heading to New York City this summer following successful stints in Los Angeles and Santa Monica, Gothamist reports.

Candytopia feels a little like Willy Wonka’s chocolate room. More than a dozen rooms with psychedelic backdrops will be on view, as well as candy-inspired interpretations of famous artworks such as Mona Lisa and The Thinker. The installation is the brainchild of Jackie Sorkin, the star of TLC’s Candy Queen.

Many of the art installations are made from actual candy, but unlike Wonka’s lickable wallpaper, visitors will have to keep their hands and tongues to themselves. Instead, guests will be given samples of various sweet treats like gummies, chocolates, and “nostalgic favorites.”

Forbes named Candytopia one of the best pop-up museums to visit in 2018. New York City seems the perfect place for the exhibit, having formerly hosted other food-inspired pop-ups like the Museum of Pizza and the Museum of Ice Cream.

Candytopia will debut in New York City on August 15 at Penn Plaza at 145 West 32nd Street. Tickets must be purchased in advance, and they can be ordered on Candytopia’s website. Private events and birthday parties can also be arranged.

Keep scrolling to see some more installations from Candytopia.

A wing of the Candytopia exhibit
Mathew Tucciarone

An Egyptian-inspired statue made of candy
Mathew Tucciarone

A candy version of the Mona Lisa
Mathew Tucciarone

A shark statue
Mathew Tucciarone

[h/t Gothamist]

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