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Deep Optics

These Glasses Track Your Eyes and Self-Focus Automatically

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Deep Optics

Since bifocals were first invented in the late 18th century, the technology behind them hasn't changed too drastically. Now an Israel-based start-up is working on a new type of lenses that use smart tech to automatically adjust their focus based on what you're looking at, MIT Technology Review reports. 

The company, called Deep Optics, has spent the past three years developing their Omnifocals. When people wearing the glasses aren't looking at objects up-close, the lenses default to focusing on objects farther away like a regular pair of glasses. The moment the wearer moves their eyes to look at something closer like a book or a phone screen, sensors built into the frame measure the distance between the pupils and send the data to a mini processor. The processor then uses this information to adjust a special liquid-crystal layer in the lenses so that it refracts light accordingly. 

This type of technology could be especially helpful for with people with presbyopia, which is the same condition that inspired Benjamin Franklin to create himself a pair of bifocals. This vision problem commonly affects people as they age, making it more difficult for them to focus on objects that are closer. Many people with presbyopia wear eyeglasses with progressive lenses that require looking through the exact right spot to focus clearly. These new types of lenses self-adjust within a fraction of a second without requiring any extra effort from the wearer.

While the glasses are still in the prototype stage, a commercial version could be coming sometime in the future; the company expects to have people begin to test them "extensively" in about two years, CEO Yariv Haddad told MIT Technology Review. Deep Optics recently announced that they have $4 million in venture capital to make their vision a reality, thanks to investors like the French glasses company Essilor. Besides the eyeglasses industry, the technology could also be of interest to virtual-reality headset manufacturers looking to make their users less prone to motion-sickness.

[h/t MIT Technology Review]

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Spéciale
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Improve Your Chopping Skills With This Knife-Cutting Board Hybrid
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Spéciale

Chopping ingredients properly is an impressive skill, and for those who haven’t mastered it yet, this part of the cooking process can be a pain. Luckily, it is possible to do your slicing and dicing without the awkward hand positions and frequent slip-ups. All you need is a knife that stays attached to the board where you’re doing the cutting.

Spotted over at Mashable, spéciale is a high-quality walnut cutting board that comes with a 17-inch Damascus steel knife built in. Whether you’re breaking down fruits, vegetables, cheese, or charcuterie, the blade can rotate across the board as you cut while the tip stays fixed in place. This leaves one hand free, so you don’t have to pause to put down your glass of wine before the chopping starts.

The designers focused on aesthetics along with functionality, so when the board is not being used in the kitchen it doubles as a serving platter. And after you’ve had a chance to enjoy the fruit of your labors, you can pop the knife off the board for easy clean-up.

Spéciale recently wrapped up a campaign on Kickstarter where it raised more than $150,500, and prior to that it debuted on Indiegogo, where it raised nearly $170,000. The product is still available to order through the Indiegogo page for $195.

[h/t Mashable]

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Retro Games Limited
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The Commodore 64 Will Return as a Mini Console With Dozens of Games
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Retro Games Limited

Today’s video games may be more innovative than ever, but that doesn’t stop many from returning to the old-school games that remind them of their childhood. Following Nintendo’s massive success with the NES Classic in 2016 and the SNES Classic in September, the Commodore 64 is set to be the next vintage gaming device to get a miniature makeover. As Nerdist reports, Retro Games Limited will release a plug-and-play version of the 1982 bestseller in 2018.

The C64 Mini will be half the size of the original Commodore 64 computer and will feature 64 retro 8-bit titles, including Impossible Mission, Armalyte, Paradroid, and California Games. The kit will include a joystick, an HDMI cable for hooking up the console to your TV, and a USB power cable for charging it.

The console will have two USB ports that can be used to connect an extra joystick or plug in a full-sized keyboard to use the C64 Mini for simple coding. This could be especially useful when you get bored of the pre-loaded games and want to program a new one of your own from scratch.

The C64 Mini is set to retail for around $70 when it hits shelves in 2018, making it $10 cheaper than the newly-released SNES classic. Retro Games also plans to revive a full-sized version of the original Commodore 64 to sell in 2018. For an idea of what that might look like, check out this classic Commodore 64 how-to video from 1982.

[h/t Nerdist]

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