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Boeing is Developing Self-Cleaning Airplane Bathrooms 

Boeing
Boeing

Boeing wants to make your airplane bathroom experience more pleasant, with the help of germ-destroying lights. The company has introduced a self-cleaning bathroom prototype to combat the dirty reality of public bathrooms, according to CNET.

The prototype looks similar to a standard bathroom, equipped with brighter lights and touchless fixtures. In order to minimize the amount of contact that customers need to have with bathroom surfaces, the toilet seat and trash flap both open on their own, while the faucets, soap dispenser, and hand dryer turn on with a wave of the hand. After a passenger uses the bathroom and exits, everything is bathed in a sterilizing Far UV light for three seconds, killing 99.9 percent of germs.

"In the prototype, we position the lights throughout the lavatory so that it floods the touch surfaces like the toilet seat, sink and countertops with the UV light once a person exits the lavatory," Jeanne Yu, Boeing Commercial Airplanes Director of Environmental Performance, explains in a press release. "This sanitizing even helps eliminate odors.” 

Because plane equipment has to go through rigorous testing before it makes it into the air, it might be a while before these self-cleaning lavatories make it onto your flight. Boeing is also still working on a hands-free latch for the door as well as a vacuum vent system to clean the floors.

[h/t CNET]

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History
A Very Brief History of Chamber Pots

Some of the oldest chamber pots found by archeologists have been discovered in ancient Greece, but portable toilets have come a long way since then. Whether referred to as "the Jordan" (possibly a reference to the river), "Oliver's Skull" (maybe a nod to Oliver Cromwell's perambulating cranium), or "the Looking Glass" (because doctors would examine urine for diagnosis), they were an essential fact of life in houses and on the road for centuries. In this video from the Wellcome Collection, Visitor Experience Assistant Rob Bidder discusses two 19th century chamber pots in the museum while offering a brief survey of the use of chamber pots in Britain (including why they were particularly useful in wartime).

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Joe Scarnici/Getty Images for Tradesy
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fun
Move Over, Golden Toilet: Now There’s a $100K Louis Vuitton Potty
Joe Scarnici/Getty Images for Tradesy
Joe Scarnici/Getty Images for Tradesy

In 2016, the Guggenheim Museum installed a one-of-a-kind, fully functional toilet made of solid gold, created by the Italian artist Maurizio Cattelan just for the museum. Now, there’s another insanely luxurious art-toilet to look out for—and this one you can take home.

Made by artist Illma Gore for the luxury resale platform Tradesy, the Loo-Uis Vuitton Toilet is covered in $15,000 worth of monogram leather ripped from Louis Vuitton bags. Everything but the inside of the bowl—which is gold—is covered in that instantly recognizable brown designer leather. It's one way to show your brand loyalty, for sure.

The toilet is fully functional, meaning, yes, you can poop in it—although that would require you (at some point) to clean the leather undersides of the seat, which sounds … gross. But then again, the leather is brown, so do what you will.

A toilet art piece stands under a pink neon sign that reads ‘No Fake Shit.’
Joe Scarnici/Getty Images for Tradesy

Does sitting on it feel like using those squishy-soft toilet seats your grandma has? Please let us know, because we don’t have the $100,000 it would take to buy it for ourselves. Note that while the site sells used goods, the description makes sure to specify that this one is new.

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