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Leandro Fernández // Image Comics
Leandro Fernández // Image Comics

The 5 Most Interesting Comics of the Week

Leandro Fernández // Image Comics
Leandro Fernández // Image Comics

Every week I write about the most interesting new comics hitting comic shops, bookstores, digital, and the web. Feel free to comment below if there's a comic you've read recently that you want to talk about or an upcoming comic that you'd like me to consider highlighting.

1. THE ART OF CHARLIE CHAN HOCK CHYE

By Sonny Liew
Pantheon

The Art of Charlie Chan Hock Chye is about the life and work of "Singapore’s most famous comic artist," Charlie Chan Hock Chye, as told by his sketches, comics, personal newspaper clippings, and writing. The presentation of this book is so dense, thorough, and convincing that many early reviewers were fooled into thinking that Chan is a real person rather than a fictional character created by writer and artist Sonny Liew.

While the title character may be fictitious, much of what Liew explores in this book is rooted in the real-life social and political history of Singapore. From its beginnings as a British colony to its failed merger with neighboring Malaysia and struggle for independence, Liew explores these years through the types of comics Chan supposedly made at the time and how they reflected his own political persuasions. It also runs a wide gamut of comic book history, with Liew turning in a tour de force artistic performance to show Chan’s own style change with the popularity of different comic styles of the era, mimicking the work of artists such as Osamu Tezuka, Carl Barks, Frank Miller, and others.

Liew, a native of Singapore, received a grant from the Singapore National Arts Council to create the book, only to have it revoked on claims that his work “undermines the authority or legitimacy” of the government. This would prove to be a controversial move that led to the book selling out its first few print runs in that country. Now, it comes to the States, where Liew is known to many comics fans for his work on DC’s Dr. Fate and 2014’s acclaimed The Shadow Hero with writer Gene Luen Yang. This, however, may be the book that truly makes him a star in the U.S.

2. THE DISCIPLINE #1

By Peter Milligan and Leandro Fernández
Image Comics

In the first issue of The Discipline, an unhappily married woman meets a seductive European art collector and can’t help but fall under his thrall. By the end of the issue, the seduction has turned into a full-blown supernatural fight for her soul.

Peter Milligan and Leandro Fernández began work on their new series The Discipline a few years ago, originally intending it to be published by DC’s Vertigo imprint. DC declined to publish it, leaving the work in limbo for a couple of years. Now, it gets to see the light of day as Milligan’s first Image Comics-published series. It’s not known why DC passed on the book, but there is definitely a lot of graphic sexual content which might test the nerves of some publishers. Its depiction of dangerous, forbidden sex with a supernatural twist (think 50 Shades of Grey if Christian Grey was an incubus) brings to mind some of Milligan’s groundbreaking and edgy early Vertigo work like Enigma. Leandro Fernández’ deep, rich shadows and clear, slightly exaggerated lines provide a great complement to Milligan’s dark and witty writing.

3. THE COMPLETE WIMMEN'S COMIX

Edited by Trina Robbins
Fantagraphics

Franck Bondoux, the executive officer of the Angoulême Comics Festival, defended the decision to nominate only men for its lifetime achievement award, insisting that there just aren't many women in the history of comics art. "The Festival likes women, but cannot rewrite the history of comics,” he said in an interview with Le Monde.

There’s no better time than now for The Complete Wimmen’s Comix, a big, two-volume hardcover box set, to come along and prove Bondoux and his fellow festival organizers wrong.

Back in 1972, ten women cartoonists started the first comics anthology featuring only women comic creators called Wimmen’s Comix. The underground “comix” movement of the 1960s inspired different kinds of artists to make different kinds of comics with an anything-goes attitude. Cartoonist Trina Robbins had previously put out a one-shot comic called It Ain’t Me, Babe. It was the first comic made entirely by women, and it became the impetus for the Wimmen’s Comix collective to form.

Published by Last Gasp, Robbins and her fellow “founding mothers” made comics about subjects you never would have seen male cartoonists of the ‘60s broach: abortion, lesbianism, menstruation, and feminism in general. Over the next twenty years, Wimmen’s Comix would go on to publish a number of women cartoonists who deserve to be considered among the all-time greats, such as Aline Kominsky-Crumb, Melinda Gebbie, Phoebe Gloeckner, Carol Tyler, Mary Fleener, and others.

This $100 box set from Fantagraphics contains an introduction by Robbins, the It Ain’t Me, Babe comic that started it all, and every issue of Wimmen’s Comix, many of which have never before been reprinted.

4. BLACK WIDOW #1

By Mark Waid, Chris Samnee and Mathew Wilson
Marvel Comics

These days, Marvel has moved to a “seasonal” approach to publishing most of their series, in which titles are renumbered as if they were TV shows starting a new season. These frequent #1 issues are more enticing for new readers (and I guess they also hook people like me into writing about them more than, say, a 13th issue). The impetus for a relaunch is usually a new creative team coming in with a new storyline or direction, and that is exactly what is happening with Black Widow.

The previous series by Nathan Edmonson and Phil Noto was a moody espionage thriller with painterly, realistic art from Noto. The new creative team of Mark Waid and Chris Samnee will be changing the tone much in the way they did a few years back with a similarly moody character—Daredevil. They excel at fun action, and that is exactly their plan for Widow, with this first issue consisting of a big chase scene as Nathasha Romanova goes on the run from her handlers at S.H.I.E.L.D.

5. STELA

Since Comixology launched in 2007, they have dominated the digital comics landscape with their expansive library and “Guided View” technology allowing for panel-to-panel reading on a smartphone. No one has come close to competing with their technology or selection, but that doesn’t mean there isn’t room for something new.

An iPhone app called Stela launched last week with a different approach to digital comics. Unlike most digital readers, they are focusing on smaller screens rather than tablets and are commissioning original content that's created specifically to be read on their app. Stela comics are designed for easy legibility on screen, and you read them by scrolling vertically instead of tapping or swiping. This page-less approach to comics is something that has been embraced by many webcomic makers, and it feels more natural on the phone than even Comixology’s Guided View solution. Some of the comics on Stela, like Irene Koh’s Afrina and the Glass Coffin, cleverly use visual cues like word balloons that overlap the next panel down to guide you in the right direction.

Stela has recruited an interesting mix of up-and-coming creators like Koh and established veterans like Brian Wood to create original content just for the app. You can read the first chapters of any comic for free and then subscribe for $4.99 a month to get full access.

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BEHROUZ MEHRI/AFP/Getty Images
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10 Amazing Facts About Stan Lee
BEHROUZ MEHRI/AFP/Getty Images
BEHROUZ MEHRI/AFP/Getty Images

Comic book legend Stan Lee’s life has always been an open book. The co-creator of some of the greatest superheroes and most beloved stories of all time has become just as mythical and larger-than-life as the characters in the panels. In 2015, around the time of Marvel’s 75th anniversary, Lee had the idea to reflect on his own life, as he said, “in the one form it has never been depicted, as a comic book … or if you prefer, a graphic memoir.”

The result, published by the Touchstone imprint of Simon & Schuster in 2015, was Amazing Fantastic Incredible: A Marvelous Memoir—which was written by Lee with Peter David and features artwork by cartoonist and illustrator Colleen Doran. Here are 10 things we learned about Lee, on his 95th birthday.

1. HIS WIFE IS ALSO HIS BARBER.

As a bit of a throwaway fact, Stanley Martin Lieber (Stan Lee) reveals the secret of his slicked back mane on the second page of his memoir. “My whole adult life, I’ve never been to a barber,” he writes. “Joanie always cuts my hair.”

2. HIS CONFIDENCE COMES FROM HIS MOTHER.

Amazing Fantastic IncredibleCourtesy POW! Entertainment[2].jpg

Stan Lee writes that as a child he loved to read books by Mark Twain, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Jules Verne, H.G. Wells, and others, and his mother often watched him read. “I probably got my self-confidence from the fact that my mother thought everything I did was brilliant.”

3. YOUNG STAN LEE WROTE OBITUARIES.

Before writing about the fantastic lives of fictional characters, Stan Lee wrote antemortem obituaries for celebrities at an undisclosed news office in New York. He says that he eventually quit that job because it was too “depressing.”

4. CAPTAIN AMERICA WAS HIS FIRST BIG BREAK.

A week into his job at Timely Comics, Lee got the opportunity to write a two-page Captain America comic. He wrote it under the pen name Stan Lee (now his legal name) and titled it "Captain America Foils the Traitor’s Revenge." His first full comic script would come in Captain America Issue 5, published August 1, 1941.

5. HE WROTE TRAINING FILMS FOR THE ARMY WITH DR. SEUSS.

After being transferred from the army’s Signal Corps in New Jersey, Lee worked as a playwright in the Training Film Division in Queens with eight other men, including a few who went on to be very famous: Pulitzer Prize-winning author William Saroyan, cartoonist Charles Addams (creator of The Addams Family), director Frank Capra (Mr. Smith Goes to Washington [1939] and It’s a Wonderful Life [1946]) and Theodor Geisel, better known as Dr. Seuss.

6. HE DEFIED THE COMICS CODE AUTHORITY WITH AN ANTI-DRUG COMIC.

In 1971, Lee received a letter from the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare asking him to put an anti-drug message in one of his books. He came up with a Spider-Man story that involved his best friend Harry abusing pills because of a break-up. The CCA would not approve the story with their seal because of the mention of drugs, but Lee convinced his publisher, Martin Goodman, to run the comic anyway.

7. AN ISSUE AT THE PRINTERS TURNED THE HULK GREEN.

The character was supposed to be gray, but Lee writes that the printer had a hard time keeping the color consistent. “So as of issue #2,” Lee writes, “with no explanation, he turned green.”

8. HIS WIFE DESTROYED HIS PRIZED TYPEWRITER.


Rich Polk/Getty Images for Entertainment Weekly

According to Lee, during an argument, Joanie destroyed the typewriter he used to write the first issues for characters including Spider-Man and The Fantastic Four. “This happened before eBay," he writes. "Too bad. I could’ve auctioned the parts and made a mint.”

9. A FIRE DESTROYED HIS INTERVIEWS AND LECTURES.

When Lee moved his family to Los Angeles, he set up a studio in Van Nuys where he stored videotapes of his talks and interviews, along with a commissioned bust of his wife. The building was lost to a blaze that the fire department believed was arson, but no one was ever charged with the crime.

10. HIS FAVORITE MARVEL FILM CAMEO WAS BASED ON ONE FROM THE COMICS.

Beginning with the first Spider-Man film in 2002, Stan Lee has made quick cameos in Marvel films as a service to the fans. He says that his appearance in Fantastic Four: Rise of the Silver Surfer (2007) was inspired by the story of Reed and Sue Richards’ wedding in Fantastic Four Annual Volume 1 #3, in which he and artist/writer Jack Kirby attempt to crash the ceremony but are thwarted.

All images courtesy of Touchstone unless otherwise noted.

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Space Goat Publishing
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These Evil Dead 2 Comics Will Look Groovy on Your Bookshelf
Space Goat Publishing
Space Goat Publishing

Bruce Campbell has been quoted as saying the gallons of fake blood poured into his face during filming of the 1987 cult classic horror film Evil Dead 2: Dead by Dawn led to a week of red-tinged mucus leaking out of his nostrils. Fortunately, no Campbells were harmed in the making of two new comic collections from Space Goat Productions that are now being funded on Kickstarter. The Evil Dead 2 Omnibus features over 300 pages of stories set in the Necronomicon-plagued universe featured in numerous comic book miniseries; The Art of Evil Dead 2 reveals never-before-seen production art from both the comics and ancillary projects.

The campaign is the latest from Space Goat, the Bellingham, Washington-based company that’s made a cottage (or cabin) industry from products spinning out of the Sam Raimi-directed film, which is celebrating its 30th anniversary this year. In addition to the new collections, the publisher has also issued an Evil Dead 2 coloring book; a comic where Campbell’s demon-fighting hero, Ash Williams, encounters Adolf Hitler; and a forthcoming board game where players can navigate Deadite threats while shaking their head at Ash’s questionable competency. (No matter the iteration, he seems ill-equipped to deal with the threat of his own possessed and lopped-off hand.)

According to Space Goat publisher Shon Bury, licensing the Evil Dead 2 property from rights holders StudioCanal in 2015 has been a buoy in navigating the difficult waters of comic book publishing. (Even Marvel, which rakes in billions through its film franchises, struggles to sell more than 60,000 to 70,000 copies of its most popular monthly titles.) One day into its Kickstarter launch, the Evil Dead titles had reached 50 percent of their $20,000 funding goal.

“It’s definitely our flagship on the publishing side,” Bury tells Mental Floss. “The board game is our top seller in the Evil Dead category, and the coloring book sells really well. They’re our evergreen products.”

The cover to 'The Art of Evil Dead 2' from Space Goat Publishing
Space Goat Publishing

Exploring Ash’s adventures in other media comes with a few caveats. While Space Goat is free to explore the characters and situations portrayed in Evil Dead 2, incorporating ideas from the rest of the series (including 1993’s Army of Darkness or the Starz series Ash vs. Evil Dead) is generally off-limits. And while the StudioCanal rights include a likeness of Campbell, the actor has veto power over how he’s depicted on the page. “For some reason, he doesn’t like the dimple on his chin to be drawn,” Bury says. “But he’s very insistent that the scar on his face from the movie is always there.”

Other actors featured in the film—like Richard Domeier, the future home-shopping host who portrayed “Evil Ed”—may not have granted their likeness rights, but his Deadite character design is part of the deal. “You want to inoculate the owner or licensor of the rights,” Bury says. “So we submit drawings and they might say, ‘No, too close to the actor.’”

That development process is part of what makes up The Art of Evil Dead 2, one-half of Space Goat’s current Kickstarter project that follows a successful Evil Dead 2 board game launch in 2016. The campaigns, Bury says, help target Ash fans with material that might not get enough attention if it were released directly to retailers. “Kickstarter is basically social media. It’s direct engagement, our way of saying to fans, ‘Hey, you’re really going to like this.’”

Bury expects fans to be just as enthused about Evil Dead 2: The Doppelganger Wars, a limited series due for release in 2018 that sees Ash and sidekick Annie Knowby enter the mirror dimension glimpsed at in Evil Dead 2 to discover the true origins of both the demon-summoning Necronomicon and the cult surrounding it. A meeting with H.P. Lovecraft may also be on deck, along with other narratives that would carry the license through the end of the publisher’s current agreement with StudioCanal in late 2019.

Still to be decided: whether Ash will ever encounter the werewolves of The Howling, Space Goat’s latest horror license. “Those conversations have occurred,” Bury says. “It would be a natural. But it’s also challenging because the royalties [for the licenses] double.” 

Digital versions of The Art of Evil Dead 2 and the Evil Dead Omnibus will be available to backers pledging $20 beginning in December. Softcover, hardcover, and Necronomicon slipcase editions ($30 and up) ship in May 2018. The Kickstarter runs through November 25.

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