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15 Sauces from Around the World You Should Try

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From tangy barbecue to fiery Tabasco, Americans love their sauces. But if you’re looking for a slightly different way to dip, season, marinate, or just add some extra kick to your food, you owe it to yourself to try one or more of these international selections.

1. PONZU

Imagine soy sauce with a citrus kick, and you’ve got the basic flavor of this Japanese staple. International markets carry it by the bottle, but try making it at home for a fresher, more flavorful take with Mark Bittman’s recipe. Use it as a salad dressing, as a meat marinade, or as a dipping sauce for seafood.

2. CHERMOULA

Parsley, cilantro, coriander, garlic and saffron are just a few ingredients that make up this pungent north African herb sauce. It’s traditionally served with grilled seafood, though it can also liven up lamb and other grilled meats, as well as roasted vegetables. Try this recipe from Serious Eats that adds in cayenne pepper and paprika.

3. PEBRE

Chileans always have this spicy spread on hand at barbecues, or asados. They particularly enjoy serving it over toasted bread, though it also goes well with meats, salads, empanadas—basically, anything that could use a little kick. The recipe varies by region, with cilantro, tomatoes and habanero peppers comprising the backbone of this chimichurri-like sauce.

4. SAMBAL

Sriracha fans should try this Indonesian favorite that combines peppers, herbs, citrus, and fish sauce. Traditionally made with a mortar and pestle, it’s chunkier and less acidic than many southeast Asian hot sauces while still packing a mean punch.

5. MOLHO APIMENTADO

Brazilians enjoy this versatile sauce as a marinade, as a seasoning, and as a dip for vegetables and grilled meats. It’s known as a hot sauce, but you can vary the heat to your liking while still retaining the fresh, flavorful taste. Try it with a hearts of palm salad and a New Orleans twist courtesy of Chef Emeril Lagasse.

6. TKEMALI

This plum sauce is the equivalent of ketchup for many Georgians (the country, not the state). Sour and tangy—The Kitchn calls it “a cross between ketchup and chutney”—it’s often served with potato dishes and meats, and mixed in with stews. The flavor profile varies based on the ripeness of the plums being used, from tart green plums to milder red ones.

7. GOCHUJANG

This complex hot sauce from South Korea combines chilis, fermented soybeans and sticky rice. It’s too thick and potent to use as a finishing sauce like Sriracha, but it’s perfect for cooking. Try adding it to miso soup or using it to coat grilled or fried vegetables.

8. BAJAN PEPPER SAUCE

Visitors to Barbados often try this hot sauce and swear off the likes of Tabasco forever. Locals covet it, as well. Made from mustard, vinegar and a Caribbean pepper known as the Scotch bonnet, it’s best used on meat and seafood. Try making your own or, if you’re low on Caribbean peppers, order a jar of Lottie’s.

9. CHAKALAKA

Often referred to as a spicy relish, this colorfully named South African staple began in the country’s townships, where residents combined basic ingredients like beans, onions, tomatoes, and peppers. Thick and flavorful, it works well as a side dish (think coleslaw) or as a topping for grilled bread and meat.

10. SHREWSBURY SAUCE

The English know how to do savory, and this sauce, made with redcurrant jelly, butter, flour, and red wine, is a great accompaniment for any pot roast, rack of lamb or pork dish. British chef Delia Smith has a spot-on recipe that adds in mustard powder and Worcestershire sauce. Pour it over meat like gravy, and tuck in.

11. HAYDARI

Lots of people know about Greek tzatziki, but not as many are familiar with haydari, a yogurt-based sauce that’s popular in neighboring Turkey. Made with parsley, mint, olive oil, and Greek yogurt, it's great as an appetizer served over crackers or toast, or as an accompaniment to grilled fish.

12. AGRODOLCE

Italy is renowned for its ragus and marinara sauce. Flying under the radar, though, are old-world recipes like agrodolce that show a different side of the tomato-rich country. Its name translates to “sour sweet,” and that’s exactly what you get with a sticky sauce that combines sugar and balsamic vinegar. Try it as a glaze next time you make pork chops, and don’t be afraid to customize it with fruits, spices, and other ingredients.

13. CORIANDER CHUTNEY

This chutney is a staple in many Indian households, where it often accompanies snacks like samosas and pakoras. Try it as a dipping sauce, or as a spread for a veggie sandwich. It’s easy to make, and has a refreshing, mild spice profile.

14. NAM JIM JAEW

There are many different Thai dipping sauces, but this one stands out for its sharp, smoky flavor. Dried chili powder and toasted rice powder are the key ingredients, along with lime juice, fish sauce and a few choice herbs. Mix everything together and serve it in a small bowl alongside just about any grilled meat.

15. GUASACACA

This Venezuelan avocado salsa has a rich, earthy flavor that goes well with everything from tacos to salads to grilled steak. It’s naturally mild, but can be spiced up by adding peppers or hot sauce to the mix. Best of all: It’s simple to make. Follow Chef George Duran’s recipe, which calls for rough-chopped onion, cilantro, green peppers and avocados thrown into a blender along with some olive oil and garlic. Just push the button, and voila!

All images courtesy of iStock unless otherwise noted.

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Eggo Came Up With 9 Perfect Recipes for Your Stranger Things Viewing Party
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As the return of Stranger Things draws near, you can expect to see fans break out their blonde wigs, hang up their Christmas lights, and play the Netflix show’s theme song on repeat. But Eggo knows the best way to celebrate the season two premiere on October 27 is with a menu featuring Eleven’s favorite snack. As Mashable reports, the brand has joined forces with Netflix to release a menu of gourmet waffle recipes to serve at your Stranger Things viewing party.

The lineup includes nine creative takes on Eggo waffles, each one named after an episode from the new season. The menu kicks off with “MADMAX,” a spin on chicken and waffles served with maple syrup and Sriracha. As the season progresses, pairings alternate between sweet (like “Will the Wise,” featuring ice cream and hot fudge) and savory (like “Trick or Treat, Freak,” a waffle version of a BLT). Check out the full menu below with directions from the experts at Eggo.

EPISODE 1: "MADMAX"

Eggo recipe.

1 Kellogg’s Eggo Homestyle Waffle
1 tablespoon maple syrup
1/4 teaspoon Sriracha
1 deli hot chicken tender

1. Toast Kellogg’s Eggo Homestyle Waffle according to package directions.

2. In a small microwave-safe bowl, combine syrup and Sriracha. Microwave on high for 15 to 20 seconds or until just warm.

3. Place warm chicken tender on top of waffle. Drizzle with syrup mixture. Serve with knife and fork.

EPISODE 2: "TRICK OR TREAT, FREAK"

Bacon, lettuce, and tomato sandwiched between two waffles

4 Kellogg’s Eggo Homestyle waffles
2 lettuce leaves
4 thin tomato slices
1/8 teaspoon coarsely ground black pepper
8 slices turkey bacon, crisp-cooked and drained
3 tablespoons blue cheese salad dressing

1. Toast Kellogg’s Eggo Homestyle Waffles according to package directions.

2. Top two of the waffles with lettuce and tomato slices. Sprinkle with pepper. Top with bacon. Drizzle with salad dressing. Add remaining waffles. Cut each into halves. Serve immediately.

EPISODE 3: "THE POLLYWOG"

Eggo recipe.

1 1/2 cups vanilla ice cream, divided
3/4 cup strawberry ice cream
3 Kellogg’s Eggo Homestyle waffles or Kellogg’s Eggo Chocolatey Chip waffles
1 Banana, sliced
3 Strawberries, sliced
2 cups frozen reduced-fat, non-dairy whipped dessert topping, thawed
Assorted small candies (optional)
Gold-colored decorator’s sugar or edible glitter (optional)

1. Place vanilla and strawberry ice cream in the refrigerator for 20 to 30 minutes until slightly softened.

2. Meanwhile, on large piece of parchment paper or wax paper, trace 4 1/2-inch circles. Place paper on baking sheet. Working quickly, spoon 3/4 cup of the vanilla ice cream onto one circle. Flatten into a 1/2-inch-thick, 4 1/2-inch-diameter disk. Repeat with remaining vanilla ice cream and strawberry ice cream, making disks. Lightly cover with wax paper and freeze at least two hours or until firm.

3. Toast Kellogg's Eggo Homestyle Waffles according to package directions. Cool. Leave one waffle whole. Cut remaining waffles into quarters.

4. Remove paper from ice cream disks. Top with one of the vanilla ice cream disks and four waffle quarters, leaving a small space between pieces. Top with vanilla ice cream disk and more waffle pieces (always arrange waffle quarters so they align with waffle quarters on lower layers). Add the remaining vanilla ice cream disk and more waffle pieces. Top with strawberry ice cream disk and the remaining four waffle quarters. Wrap in plastic wrap. Gently press down on the stack. Freeze at least 3 hours or until firm.

5. Remove waffle stack from freezer. Remove plastic wrap. Let stand at room temperature for 15 minutes. Mound with whipped topping. Decorate with candies and gold sugar (if desired).

6. To serve, cut into four pieces, cutting between waffle quarters.

TIP: To easily form ice cream disks, place a 4 1/2-inch round cookie cutter on parchment or wax paper on baking sheet. Place ice cream inside of cookie cutter and smooth into solid disk. Remove cookie cutter and repeat for remaining ice cream disks. Freeze as directed above.

EPISODE 4: "WILL THE WISE"

Eggo waffle.

1 Kellogg’s Eggo Homestyle Waffle
1 tablespoon hot fudge ice cream topping
1/3 cup vanilla ice cream
1 tablespoon caramel ice cream topping
2 tablespoons aerosol whipped cream
1 tablespoon dry roasted peanuts

1. Toast Kellogg's Eggo Homestyle Waffle according to package directions. Heat fudge ice cream topping according to package directions.

2. Scoop ice cream onto center of waffle.

3. Drizzle with fudge and caramel toppings. Add whipped cream. Sprinkle with peanuts. Serve with knife and fork.

EPISODE 5: "DIG DUG"

Eggo waffle.

4 ounces cream cheese, softened
1/4 cup canned pumpkin (not pumpkin pie filling)
1/4 cup powdered sugar
1/4 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice
1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon vanilla
6 Kellogg’s Eggo Homestyle waffles
3 tablespoons orange-colored decorator’s sugar
6 oblong chewy fruit-flavored green candies or 2 small green gumdrops, cut into 6 pieces

1. In a medium bowl, stir together cream cheese, pumpkin, powdered sugar, pumpkin pie spice, cinnamon, and vanilla. Cover and refrigerate at least two hours or until firm enough to shape.

2. Meanwhile, toast Kellogg’s Eggo Homestyle Waffles according to package directions.

3. Place orange-colored sugar in a small bowl. Using a small ice cream scoop or tablespoon, shape about 2 tablespoons of cream cheese mixture into pumpkin shape. Roll in orange sugar. Place on one waffle. Repeat with remaining cream cheese mixture, sugar and waffles.

4. Press green candy into each cream cheese ball for pumpkin stem. Serve with spreaders or knives to spread cream cheese mixture over waffles.

EPISODE 6: "THE SPY"

Eggo waffles.

3 frozen fully-cooked sausage links
2 tablespoons green bell pepper
2 tablespoons water
1 Kellogg’s Eggo Homestyle Waffle
1 tablespoon maple syrup
1/4 teaspoon Sriracha

1. In a small nonstick skillet, cook sausage links, bell pepper, and water, covered, over medium heat for five minutes. Remove pepper from skillet. Set aside. Continue cooking sausage, uncovered, about two minutes more or until browned, turning frequently.

2. Meanwhile, toast Kellogg's Eggo Homestyle Waffle according to package directions.

3. In a small microwave-safe bowl, combine syrup and Sriracha. Microwave on high for 15 to 20 seconds or until just warm.

4. Arrange sausage pieces and pepper pieces on waffle. Drizzle with syrup mixture. Serve with knife and fork.

"EPISODE 7"

Eggo waffle.

6 cups canned pineapple slices, drained
1 tablespoon flaked coconut, toasted
1 Kellogg’s Eggo Homestyle Waffle
2 tablespoons aerosol whipped cream
1 tablespoon macadamia nuts, chopped

1. Cut pineapple slices into four pieces.

2. Toast Kellogg’s Eggo Homestyle Waffle according to package directions. Place on serving plate. Top with coconut, pineapple slices, whipped cream, and macadamia nuts. Serve with knife and fork.

"EPISODE 8"

Eggo waffle.

6 eggs
1/3 cup milk
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper
6 Kellogg’s Eggo Homestyle waffles
1 tablespoon butter
3 slices bacon, crisp-cooked and crumbled
6 thin slices Monterey Jack cheese or cheddar cheese (3 oz. total)
Ketchup or salsa (optional)

1. In a medium bowl, beat together eggs, milk, salt, and pepper with a fork until well combined. Set aside.

2. Place frozen waffles in a single layer on baking sheet. Bake, uncovered, at 450°F for five minutes.

3. Meanwhile, melt butter in a large nonstick skillet. Pour in egg mixture. Cook, over medium heat, until mixture begins to set on bottom and around edges. With spatula, lift and fold partially cooked eggs, allowing uncooked portions to flow underneath. Continue cooking and folding for two to three minutes or until egg mixture is cooked through.

4. Top waffles with egg mixture, crumbled bacon, and cheese slices. Bake, uncovered, at 450°F about one minute more or until cheese melts. Serve with ketchup or salsa (if desired).

"EPISODE 9"

Eggo waffle.

6 Kellogg’s Eggo Homestyle waffles
6 slices mozzarella cheese or provolone cheese (6 oz. total)
24 slices pepperoni (about 2 oz. total)
1/3 cup pizza sauce

1. Place Kellogg's Eggo Homestyle waffles in single layer on baking sheet. Bake at 450°F for three minutes. Turn waffles over. Bake at 450°F for two minutes more.

2. Cut waffles into quarters. Return to baking sheet.

3. Cut cheese slices into pieces to fit on waffle quarters.

4. Top waffle quarters with cheese pieces, pepperoni slices and pizza sauce. Bake, uncovered, at 450°F for three to four minutes or until cheese melts. Serve warm.

Making the full nine-course menu might take a lot of work, but then again, it’s probably healthy to plan some cooking projects to break up your binge-watching session. Once you're done burning through all those waffles (and episodes), Eggo has a few suggestions for what to do with the empty box. Accessories like an Eggo flashlight or a bloody tissue box sound like the perfect way to make your Stranger Things costume stand out at this year’s Halloween party.

Instructions for crafting with leftover Eggo box.

Instructions for crafting with leftover Eggo box.

[h/t Mashable]

All images courtesy of Eggo.

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The Little-Known History of Fruit Roll-Ups
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David Kessler, Flickr // CC BY-SA 2.0

The thin sheets of “fruit treats” known as Fruit Roll-Ups have been a staple of supermarkets since 1983, when General Mills introduced the snack to satisfy the sweet tooth of kids everywhere. But as Thrillist writer Gabriella Gershenson recently discovered, the Fruit Roll-Up has an origin that goes much further back—all the way to the turn of the 20th century.

The small community of Syrian immigrants in New York City in the early 1900s didn’t have the packaging or marketing power of General Mills, but they had the novel idea of offering an apricot-sourced “fruit leather” they called amardeen. A grocery proprietor named George Shalhoub would import an apricot paste from Syria that came in massive sheets. At the request of customers, employees would snip off a slice and offer the floppy treat that was named after cowhide because it was so hard to chew.

Although Shalhoub’s business relocated to Brooklyn in the 1940s, the embryonic fruit sheet continued to thrive. George’s grandson, Louis, decided to sell crushed, dried apricots in individually packaged servings. The business later became known as Joray, which sold the first commercial fruit roll-up in 1960. When a trade publication detailed the family’s process in the early 1970s, it opened the floodgates for other companies to begin making the distinctive treat. Sunkist was an early player, but when General Mills put their considerable advertising power behind their Fruit Roll-Ups, they became synonymous with the sticky snack.

Joray is still in business, offering kosher roll-ups that rely more heavily on fruit than the more processed commercial version. But the companies have one important thing in common: They both have the sense not to refer to their product as “fruit leather.”

[h/t Thrillist]

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