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This Device Lets You Transform Hot Coffee Into Chilled Brew in 90 Seconds

Like your coffee cold? Instead of watering down your cup of joe with ice cubes or waiting for it to chill in the fridge, try the HyperChiller. It's a simple container with an ice-surrounded central cooling chamber. That might not seem like enough to warrant the name, but as HyperChiller's website states: "the surface area to volume ratio in that chamber is through the roof, so it works FAST!"

According to Outside, the handy gadget can cool 12 ounces of freshly brewed java in just 90 seconds. All you have to do is stick the HyperChiller in the freezer for 6 to 12 hours ahead of time, then pour in your Breakfast Blend, and let the magic happen. Other convenient features? The HyperChiller is dishwasher safe, and since it's made from BPA-free plastic and food-grade stainless steel, you can use it to cool all kinds of drinks—not just coffee.

Last summer, the HyperChiller was funded for commercial distribution via a successful Kickstarter campaign, Maxim writes. It's now $30, and will soon be available for purchase on Amazon or its website. (Thanks to popular demand, it's currently on backorder.) Watch the above video for more information.

[h/t Outside]

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Food
Drink Your Coffee Out of a Cup Made From Coffee Waste
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HuskeeCup

Your coffee habit isn’t exactly good for the environment. For one thing, 30 to 50 percent of the original coffee plant harvested (by weight) ends up as agricultural waste, and there aren’t many uses for coffee husks and pulp. While coffee pulp can be made into flour, and in Ethiopia husks are used to brew a type of coffee called bruno, typically most of the byproducts of your morning coffee go to waste.

Huskee has another use for coffee husks. The company makes stylish coffee cups, returning coffee back to its original home inside the husk, in a sense. The dishwasher-friendly and microwavable cups are made of husks from coffee farms in Yunnan, China. The material won’t burn your hands, but it keeps your coffee warm as well as a ceramic mug would.

A stack of black cups and saucers of various sizes on an espresso machine.
HuskeeCup

Designed for both home and restaurant use, the cups come in 6-ounce, 8-ounce, and 12-ounce sizes with saucers. The company is also working on a lid so that the cups can be used on the go.

Huskee estimates that a single coffee drinker is responsible for around 6.6 pounds of husk waste per year, which doesn’t sound like much until you begin to consider how many coffee lovers there are in the world. That’s somewhere around 1.49 million tons per year, according to the company. Though coffee husks are sometimes used for animal feed, we could use a few more ways to recycle them. And if it happens to be in the form of an attractive coffee mug, so be it.

A four-pack of cups is about $37 on Kickstarter. The product is scheduled to ship before February 2018.

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science
The Brain Chemistry Behind Your Caffeine Boost
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Whether it’s consumed as coffee, candy, or toothpaste, caffeine is the world’s most popular drug. If you’ve ever wondered how a shot of espresso can make your groggy head feel alert and ready for the day, TED-Ed has the answer.

Caffeine works by hijacking receptors in the brain. The stimulant is nearly the same size and shape as adenosine, an inhibitory neurotransmitter that slows down neural activity. Adenosine builds up as the day goes on, making us feel more tired as the day progresses. When caffeine enters your system, it falls into the receptors meant to catch adenosine, thus keeping you from feeling as sleepy as you would otherwise. The blocked adenosine receptors also leave room for the mood-boosting compound dopamine to settle into its receptors. Those increased dopamine levels lead to the boost in energy and mood you feel after finishing your morning coffee.

For a closer look at how this process works, check out the video below.

[h/t TED-Ed]

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