Sleep Shepherd Blue via Kickstarter
Sleep Shepherd Blue via Kickstarter

This Headband Monitors Brain Waves to Help You Sleep at Night

Sleep Shepherd Blue via Kickstarter
Sleep Shepherd Blue via Kickstarter

According to NPR, approximately 60 million Americans suffer from insomnia each year. While there are plenty of medications on the market designed to help this issue, Dr. Michael Larson was inspired to create a drug-free alternative.

The Sleep Shepherd Blue headband is a wearable device that tracks brain waves and uses binaural beats to help users relax into a deeper sleep at night. Binaural beats are created when two separate signals of varying frequencies are fed into each ear and the brain tries to compensate for the difference by producing a third signal. Dr. Larson was inspired to create his product by studies that suggest these pulsations can give listeners a better perceived night's sleep.

There are other devices for sale that claim to use binaural beats to improve sleep, but this one is unique in that it also monitors brain waves. The band starts by steadily playing the beats into each ear, and then gradually slows them until it senses that you've fallen asleep. Even after the signals have stopped, the headband continues to track your brain waves through built-in sensors. If it senses that you're about to wake up, the beats begin to play again until you've fallen back into a deep slumber.

The headband also records your sleep patterns, the amount of time spent asleep, and the position of your head throughout the night. After the device gently wakes you up (oh yeah, it has an alarm function as well), you can check out an analysis of your sleep habits on the companion app. Sleep Shepherd Blue is currently available for preorder on Kickstarter, where the campaign has already surpassed its goal of $25,000 more than 10 times over. Delivery is estimated for May of this year.

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Kenmore
Kenmore's New Stand Mixer Might Whip the KitchenAid Classic
Kenmore
Kenmore

A KitchenAid stand mixer has long been a home baker's best friend. It out-mixes, -kneads, and -beats most of its competitors, all while looking gorgeous on a kitchen countertop. But in the Kenmore Ovation, the iconic stand mixer may have finally met its match. According to Reviewed, the Kenmore product rivals the KitchenAid Artisan 5-Quart mixer in terms of performance and design.

The elements of the two stand mixers are basically the same: Both come with three standard attachments—a flat beater, a dough hook, and a wire whisk. The Ovation is heavier than a KitchenAid, which means it doesn't scoot across your counter when it's working dense bread dough. It also takes just as much time to prepare heavy and chunky doughs in an Ovation as it does in a KitchenAid.

Hand pouring milk into a stand mixer.
Kenmore

Kenmore's product also offers some special features that the KitchenAid doesn't have. Instead of struggling to pour ingredients down the side of the bowl while it sits beneath the mixer, you can add them through the Ovation's patented pour-in hole on top of the machine. And the Ovation's glass bowl comes with a 360-degree splash guard that keeps your kitchen and your clothes flour- and batter-free as you mix.

The Ovation does have a few drawbacks: The six-pound glass bowl is hard to move around, as is the 30-pound mixer itself if you ever want to relocate it. But if you're looking for a sturdier stand mixer option, you can purchase the Kenmore Ovation for $350 to $400. Or you can stick with the classics and finally take home that KitchenAid Artisan 5-Quart mixer you've been dreaming of: It's currently on sale at Amazon for $240.

[h/t Reviewed]

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Citroën
These Funky Glasses Are Designed to Reduce Motion Sickness
Citroën
Citroën

There's nothing like a sudden wave of nausea to ruin a scenic road trip or a cruise. According to Visuall, the French car company Citroën has made a product that allows you to fight motion sickness without medication.

Their glass-less spectacles, called SEETROËN, implement technology first developed by the French startup Boarding Ring. Motion sickness occurs when the information we receive from our inner ear doesn't match up with what we see in front of us. SEETROËN tackles this problem in a simple way: Liquid at the bottom of all four rings (two in front of the eyes, two at the peripheries) responds to gravity and changes in movement the same way the fluid in your inner ear does. By having an "artificial horizon" to look at when you're in the back of a bumpy car, your visual senses should realign with your sense of balance, and you'll no longer feel queasy.

The accessory isn't exactly fashionable, unless maybe you're going for a space-age look, but you shouldn't worry about appearing goofy for too long. After staring at a still object like a book through the glasses for 10 to 12 minutes, you can remove them and continue to enjoy the benefits as you proceed with your trip, the company claims.

SEETROËN is currently out of stock at Citroën's lifestyle store, with the next shipment estimated for September. The company claims the spectacles show positive results 95 percent of the time, and the technology it uses won an INNOV'inMed award for health innovation. But like with any new technology meant to treat a medical condition, users should be cautious. Time-tested ways to prevent motion sickness include sitting in the front seat of a car, eating something light before you travel, and focusing your gaze on something outside the nearest window.

[h/t Visuall]

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