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YouTube

These Trained Dogs Became Unexpected Photographers

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YouTube

Dogs are often the subject of photos, but how often do they get the chance to step behind the camera? In honor of Smile Day on February 5, several Japanese dog food companies worked together to turn the tables on some unsuspecting dog owners, PetaPixel reports.

The group chose three dog-owning families and invited them to come to a studio for a family portrait. After interviewing the families about their beloved pooches, it was time for the picture. The families were surprised to find that their photographer was actually their own dog, who was secretly trained to take their picture by pressing a large red button on top of the camera. As the family posed, the canine photographer snapped some pictures (which, by the way, can't be copyrighted by the pups).

The resulting pictures were framed alongside some shots of the dogs who took the pictures. You can see the whole video, entitled “PhoDOGrapher”:

[h/t PetaPixel]

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Animals
25 Shelter Dogs Who Made It Big
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Focus Features

If you’ve been thinking of adding a four-legged friend to your brood and are deciding whether a shelter dog is right for you, consider this: Some of history’s most amazing pooches—from four-legged movie stars to heroic rescue dogs—were found in animal shelters. In honor of Adopt-a-Shelter-Dog Month, here are 25 shelter dogs who made it big.

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IKEA
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Animals
Get IKEA's New Pet Furniture Collection for Not a Lot of Scratch
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IKEA

The biggest surprise about IKEA's newest product line is that it has taken this long to debut. This week, the North American arm of the Swedish furniture giant unveiled a new assortment of furniture designed specifically for four-legged customers. Dubbed LURVIG (Swedish for “hairy”), pet owners can now browse IKEA aisles for everything from dog beds to cat scratching posts—many of which have a distinct IKEA twist.

Their pet couch ($49.95), for example, folds out into a bed; another bed is small enough to slide under a human-sized mattress. Their “cat house on legs” ($54.95) looks like a retro TV and allows space for a cat to stalk you from behind a screen.

An assortment of IKEA pet furniture
IKEA

The retailer solicited advice from veterinarians on product design that would be functional while sitting comfortably within the IKEA aesthetic. “It is quite important for IKEA to have a pet range that fits into our normal furniture range,” Barbara Schäfer, IKEA’s product risk assessment leader, told Curbed. “As a pet owner I can say, so far, the normal pet products are quite ugly.” (Don't hold back, Barbara.)

The LURVIG line is currently being rolled out to IKEA stores, but you’ll have to be willing to be your furry pal’s personal shopper; the company doesn’t allow pets in their stores, save for service animals.

[h/t Curbed]

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