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The set of Mister Rogers' television house

24 Rare Photos From Mister Rogers' Neighborhood

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The set of Mister Rogers' television house

In the years I have spent researching Mister Rogers' Neighborhood from a pop culture perspective and building the Neighborhood Archive—an online resource for all things Mister Rogers—I have always enjoyed hearing from former cast and crew members who contributed to the Neighborhood in their own unique ways.

Recently, I had the opportunity to meet David Smith—Neighborhood's Assistant Art Director throughout the early 1970s. While Mr. Smith had my full attention as he shared stories of living in Pittsburgh and working on the set of the Neighborhood during its "vintage" days (a time he shared with fellow crew member and future Hollywood star, Michael Keaton), he absolutely caught me off-guard when he sent me home with a collection of approximately 100 photographs and 35mm slides in addition to some of his original artwork used as props over four decades ago. Although a few of the photographs were eventually used for promotional purposes, a good majority were behind-the-scenes snapshots likely not seen in decades.

Here are 24 of the best shots from this collection.

Lady Aberlin (Betty Aberlin), Daniel Striped Tiger, and Fred Rogers

Don Brockett and Fred Rogers. "Potato Bugs and Cows" - Mister Rogers' Neighborhood - Episode 1300 (1973). Photo by Sandy Speiser.

David Smith (right) working on the model Neighborhood used during each episode's opening, closing, and transitions.

Fred Rogers. Photo by Sandy Speiser.

Bill "W.P." Barker with Dr. Bill and Elsie Jean Platypus.

Cast and Crew. "Potato Bugs and Cows" - Mister Rogers' Neighborhood - Episode 1300 (1973).

Fred Rogers with his son. Photo by Sandy Speiser.

Mrs. McFeely (Betsy Nadas) and Mr. McFeely (David Newell) in the Neighborhood of Make-Believe.

Jack Guest (Art Director), David Smith, and a carpenter working on King Friday's royal plane.

Betty Aberlin.

Lady Aberlin (Betty Aberlin), Mr. McFeely (David Newell), and Francois Clemmons.

Fred Rogers with Barry and Garry Nelson in the Neighborhood of Make-Believe. The Nelsons played basketball for Pittsburgh's Duquesne University from 1968-1971. Mister Rogers' Neighborhood - Episode 1173 (1971).

Fred Rogers. Photo by Sandy Speiser.

David Smith under the "potato washer-dryer-sorter-dumper" prop.

Cast and Crew. "The Snow People" - Mister Rogers' Neighborhood - Episode 1245 (1972).

Francois Clemmons and Betty Aberlin.

Crew members including David Smith (center, right) and Michael Keaton (center, left). "Potato Bugs and Cows"- Mister Rogers' Neighborhood - Episode 1300 (1973). Photo by Sandy Speiser.

Yoshi Ito and Francois Clemmons. "The Snow People" - Mister Rogers' Neighborhood - Episode 1245 (1972).

Betty Aberlin.

Robert Troll (Bob Trow) and Mr. McFeely (David Newell). Photo by Sandy Speiser.

Johnny Costa (Music Director), Betty Aberlin, and Audrey Roth. "Potato Bugs and Cows" - Mister Rogers' Neighborhood - Episode 1300 (1973). Photo by Sandy Speiser.

The Flying Zookeeni Brothers Daredevil Circus comprised of crew members such as David Smith (far right) and Michael Keaton (third from right).

The Neighborhood of Make-Believe set.

The set of Mister Rogers' television house.

For a full summary of my conversation with David M. Smith—including the complete collection of photographs, details on his artistic props, and a recorded interview—visit the Neighborhood Archive.

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Matt Cardy/Getty Images
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Check Out These Images of Last Night's Spectacular Harvest Moon
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Matt Cardy/Getty Images

Each year, a special moon comes calling around the autumnal equinox: the Harvest Moon. The Harvest Moon—the full moon that falls nearest to the equinox—rises near sunset for several days in a row, making early evenings extra-bright for a few days when farmers traditionally reveled in the extra-long twilight while harvesting their crops at the end of the summer season. And because the moon looks larger and more orange when it's near the horizon, it's particularly spectacular as it rises.

The Harvest Moon
Matt Cardy/Getty Images

October 5 marked 2017’s Harvest Moon, and you may have noticed an extra spectacular sky if you were looking up last night. It's rare for the Harvest Moon to come so late in the year: The last time it came in October was in 2009. (Last year's fell on September 16, 2016.) Here are a few luminous lunar pictures from the event, some of which make the moon look totally unreal:

And if you missed seeing the event yourself, don't worry too much: the moon will still look full for several days.

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Adobe
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With Help From Photoshop and AI, No One Will Know You Blinked in That Photo
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Adobe

After 15 minutes of posing for group photo after group photo, it looks like you’ve finally snapped the perfect one. Grandma is smiling, your nephew is sitting still, and even the dog is looking at the camera for once. Then, you find yourself in the corner: The shutter managed to capture the exact moment you blinked. Time to resume the positions.

With a new tool from Adobe, this scenario could become less common. Instead of retaking a picture every time someone closes their eyes, this feature would let you salvage the “ruined” photograph with a few clicks in Photoshop, Gizmodo reports.

The latest update of Photoshop Elements allows users to select the “Open Closed Eyes” option, choose which face in the photo they want to correct, and provide several additional photos of the subject with their eyes open. The software uses artificial intelligence to analyze each picture and determine which pair of peepers best matches the colors and lighting from the primary photograph. It then automatically pastes those eyes over the lids and blends them to make the addition look seamless.

Photoshop Elements (a simplified version of Adobe’s original image editor) offers many features that use AI algorithms to improve picture quality. Elements can automatically generate backgrounds when you move objects in a photo, suggest the best effects, and turn frowns into smiles. It even remembers the look you prefer and suggests personalized tone corrections. All of those capabilities and the new “Open Closed Eyes” tool are available today to customers who purchase Photoshop Elements 2018 for $100 (or upgrade their existing license for $80).

[h/t Gizmodo]

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