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Public Domain/IStock/Chloe Effron
Public Domain/IStock/Chloe Effron

10 Famous Birthdays to Celebrate in March

Public Domain/IStock/Chloe Effron
Public Domain/IStock/Chloe Effron

Some of our favorite historical figures were born in the month of March. We couldn't possibly name them all, but here are just a handful whose lives we'll be celebrating. 

1. MARCH 2, 1904: THEODOR GEISEL (A.K.A. DR. SEUSS)

As a student at Dartmouth during Prohibition, Geisel was caught hosting a gin-soaked get-together and was banned from the school's humor magazine, the Dartmouth Jack-O-Lantern.To keep publishing he used his middle name as a pen name: "Seuss." The "Dr." came later.

2. MARCH 3, 1911: JEAN HARLOW

Before Harlow became a leading lady and world famous sex symbol in the '30s, she did what any aspiring actor does: She worked as an extra. A teenaged Harlow and her mother were background characters in a few silent films in the late 1920s.

3. MARCH 6, 1806: ELIZABETH BARRETT BROWNING

The poetic meter in Edgar Allan Poe's "The Raven" might have originated with Browning's poem "Lady Geraldine's Courtship." Poe dedicated The Raven and Other Poems to her, “with the most enthusiastic admiration and with the most sincere esteem."

4. MARCH 14, 1879: ALBERT EINSTEIN

In 1907, Einstein had what he called the “happiest thought of my life.” It wasn't what you might expect—it was about a man falling from a building. Einstein realized that a person falling alongside a ball would not be able to recognize the effects of gravity on the ball. In other words, it’s all relative. This connection between gravity and acceleration became known as the equivalence principle.

5. MARCH 19, 1894: MOMS MABLEY

Moms Mabley and Pearl Bailey via Wikimedia Commons // Public Domain

Mabley was the first woman comedian to be featured at Harlem's famous Apollo Theater, and went on to appear on its stage more than any other performer in history.

6. MARCH 20, 1928: FRED ROGERS

Rogers wasn't just beloved by humans; Koko the gorilla was also a huge fan. The Stanford-educated Great Ape loved Mister Rogers' Neighborhood, and when Rogers took a trip to meet her, she not only embraced the television icon, but followed standard protocol based on what she'd seen on the show: she took his shoes off.

7. MARCH 21, 1685: JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH

Bach and fellow German composer George Frideric Handel were born in the same year and share yet another (far less fun) biographical note: Both were operated on rather unsuccessfully by early—and rather dubious—oculist, John Taylor. He reportedly is to blame for rendering both men blind.

8. MARCH 24, 1874: HARRY HOUDINI

Houdini was famous for debunking mystics, but he held out some hope that the living could communicate with the dead. So he and his wife Bess made a pact that whoever died first would try to reach out from beyond the grave using a secret code derived from their private stage language. Houdini died first, and Bess held séances until 1936—but (barring one time, when a medium claimed to have received the message "Rosabelle- answer- tell-pray, answer- look- tell- answer, answer- tell," which spelled out “BELIEVE” in Houdini and Bess's private stage language and was quickly dismissed as a hoax) he never came through.

9. MARCH 25, 1925: FLANNERY O'CONNOR

ajourneyroundmyskull, Flickr // CC BY 2.0

The author had a particular affinity for birds and in particular, peacocks. She owned and raised dozens of them, sending their discarded feathers to friends in the mail, and caring for her flock up until her death in 1964 at age 39.

10. MARCH 31, 1929: LIZ CLAIBORNE

In 1986, Claiborne’s company became the first one founded by a woman to be ranked on the Fortune 500 list.

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Tips For Baking Perfect Cookies
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Perfect cookies are within your grasp. Just grab your measuring cups and get started. Special thanks to the Institute of Culinary Education.

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Netflix's Most-Binged Shows of 2017, Ranked
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Netflix might know your TV habits better than you do. Recently, the entertainment company's normally tight-lipped number-crunchers looked at user data collected between November 1, 2016 and November 1, 2017 to see which series people were powering through and which ones they were digesting more slowly. By analyzing members’ average daily viewing habits, they were able to determine which programs were more likely to be “binged” (or watched for more than two hours per day) and which were more often “savored” (or watched for less than two hours per day) by viewers.

They found that the highest number of Netflix bingers glutted themselves on the true crime parody American Vandal, followed by the Brazilian sci-fi series 3%, and the drama-mystery 13 Reasons Why. Other shows that had viewers glued to the couch in 2017 included Anne with an E, the Canadian series based on L. M. Montgomery's 1908 novel Anne of Green Gables, and the live-action Archie comics-inspired Riverdale.

In contrast, TV shows that viewers enjoyed more slowly included the Emmy-winning drama The Crown, followed by Big Mouth, Neo Yokio, A Series of Unfortunate Events, GLOW, Friends from College, and Ozark.

There's a dark side to this data, though: While the company isn't around to judge your sweatpants and the chip crumbs stuck to your couch, Netflix is privy to even your most embarrassing viewing habits. The company recently used this info to publicly call out a small group of users who turned their binges into full-fledged benders:

Oh, and if you're the one person in Antarctica binging Shameless, the streaming giant just outed you, too.

Netflix broke down their full findings in the infographic below and, Big Brother vibes aside, the data is pretty fascinating. It even includes survey data on which shows prompted viewers to “Netflix cheat” on their significant others and which shows were enjoyed by the entire family.

Netflix infographic "The Year in Bingeing"
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