Public Domain/IStock/Chloe Effron
Public Domain/IStock/Chloe Effron

10 Famous Birthdays to Celebrate in March

Public Domain/IStock/Chloe Effron
Public Domain/IStock/Chloe Effron

Some of our favorite historical figures were born in the month of March. We couldn't possibly name them all, but here are just a handful whose lives we'll be celebrating. 

1. MARCH 2, 1904: THEODOR GEISEL (A.K.A. DR. SEUSS)

As a student at Dartmouth during Prohibition, Geisel was caught hosting a gin-soaked get-together and was banned from the school's humor magazine, the Dartmouth Jack-O-Lantern.To keep publishing he used his middle name as a pen name: "Seuss." The "Dr." came later.

2. MARCH 3, 1911: JEAN HARLOW

Before Harlow became a leading lady and world famous sex symbol in the '30s, she did what any aspiring actor does: She worked as an extra. A teenaged Harlow and her mother were background characters in a few silent films in the late 1920s.

3. MARCH 6, 1806: ELIZABETH BARRETT BROWNING

The poetic meter in Edgar Allan Poe's "The Raven" might have originated with Browning's poem "Lady Geraldine's Courtship." Poe dedicated The Raven and Other Poems to her, “with the most enthusiastic admiration and with the most sincere esteem."

4. MARCH 14, 1879: ALBERT EINSTEIN

In 1907, Einstein had what he called the “happiest thought of my life.” It wasn't what you might expect—it was about a man falling from a building. Einstein realized that a person falling alongside a ball would not be able to recognize the effects of gravity on the ball. In other words, it’s all relative. This connection between gravity and acceleration became known as the equivalence principle.

5. MARCH 19, 1894: MOMS MABLEY

Moms Mabley and Pearl Bailey via Wikimedia Commons // Public Domain

Mabley was the first woman comedian to be featured at Harlem's famous Apollo Theater, and went on to appear on its stage more than any other performer in history.

6. MARCH 20, 1928: FRED ROGERS

Rogers wasn't just beloved by humans; Koko the gorilla was also a huge fan. The Stanford-educated Great Ape loved Mister Rogers' Neighborhood, and when Rogers took a trip to meet her, she not only embraced the television icon, but followed standard protocol based on what she'd seen on the show: she took his shoes off.

7. MARCH 21, 1685: JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH

Bach and fellow German composer George Frideric Handel were born in the same year and share yet another (far less fun) biographical note: Both were operated on rather unsuccessfully by early—and rather dubious—oculist, John Taylor. He reportedly is to blame for rendering both men blind.

8. MARCH 24, 1874: HARRY HOUDINI

Houdini was famous for debunking mystics, but he held out some hope that the living could communicate with the dead. So he and his wife Bess made a pact that whoever died first would try to reach out from beyond the grave using a secret code derived from their private stage language. Houdini died first, and Bess held séances until 1936—but (barring one time, when a medium claimed to have received the message "Rosabelle- answer- tell-pray, answer- look- tell- answer, answer- tell," which spelled out “BELIEVE” in Houdini and Bess's private stage language and was quickly dismissed as a hoax) he never came through.

9. MARCH 25, 1925: FLANNERY O'CONNOR

ajourneyroundmyskull, Flickr // CC BY 2.0

The author had a particular affinity for birds and in particular, peacocks. She owned and raised dozens of them, sending their discarded feathers to friends in the mail, and caring for her flock up until her death in 1964 at age 39.

10. MARCH 31, 1929: LIZ CLAIBORNE

In 1986, Claiborne’s company became the first one founded by a woman to be ranked on the Fortune 500 list.

nextArticle.image_alt|e
iStock
The Simple Way to Reheat Your French Fries and Not Have Them Turn Into a Soggy Mess
iStock
iStock

Some restaurant dishes are made to be doggy-bagged and reheated in the microwave the next day. Not French fries: The more crispy and delectable they are when they first arrive on your table, the more of a soggy disappointment they’ll be when you try to revive them at home. But as The Kitchn recently shared, there’s a secret to making leftover fries you’ll actually enjoy eating.

The key is to avoid the microwave altogether. Much of the appeal of fries comes from their crunchy, golden-brown exterior and their creamy potato center. This texture contrast is achieved by deep-frying, and all it takes is a few rotations around a microwave to melt it away. As the fries heat up, they create moisture, transforming all those lovely crispy parts into a flabby mess.

If you want your fries to maintain their crunch, you need to recreate the conditions they were cooked in initially. Set a large pan filled with about 2 tablespoons of oil for every 1 cup of fries you want to cook over medium-high heat. When you see the oil start to shimmer, add the fries in a single layer. After about a minute, flip them over and allow them to cook for half a minute to a minute longer.

By heating up fries with oil in a skillet, you produce something called the Maillard Reaction: This happens when high heat transforms proteins and sugars in food, creating the browning effect that gives fried foods their sought-after color, texture, and taste.

After your fries are nice and crisp, pull them out of the pan with tongs or a spatula, set them on a paper towel to absorb excess oil, and sprinkle them with salt. Now all you need is a perfect burger to feel like you’re eating a restaurant-quality meal at home.

[h/t The Kitchn]

nextArticle.image_alt|e
iStock
Bone Collector
iStock
iStock

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER
More from mental floss studios