Arby's
Arby's

Arby’s Will Have a Vegetarian Menu for Leap Day (Which Is the Regular Menu, Minus the Meat)

Arby's
Arby's

Leap Day only happens once every four years. To celebrate, Arby’s is taking the leap and introducing meat-free menu options for one day only. Before you get excited about a Grand Tofurky Club Sandwich or soy-filled roast “beef,” know this: The vegetarian menu will be the same as the regular menu, minus the meat, but loaded with vegetables, condiments, and cheese.

That’s right! On Monday, you can order a Loaded Italian Sandwich with melted cheese, banana peppers, shredded lettuce, tomato, and red onion on a toasted Italian-style roll—sans the ham, salami, and pepperoni.

“At Arby’s, we’re proud of our meats, but we also understand that meat isn’t for everyone,” Rob Lynch, the company’s chief marketing officer and brand president, said in a press release. “So we’ve decided to give vegetarians a reason to visit Arby’s on Leap Day by offering a one-day menu designed specifically for them. If it goes well, we’ll likely bring back the vegetarian menu on February 29 each year.”

Lynch is obviously (hopefully?) joking, as the next February 29 won’t occur until 2020. Unfortunately, the “new” menu items will cost the same as their meat-filled counterparts.

[h/t Mashable]

nextArticle.image_alt|e
toyohara, Flickr // CC BY-NC 2.0 (cropped)
Meet Japan's Original (Not-so-Fresh) Form of Sushi, 'Funazushi'
toyohara, Flickr // CC BY-NC 2.0 (cropped)
toyohara, Flickr // CC BY-NC 2.0 (cropped)

When it comes to sushi, fresh is usually best. Most of the sushi we eat in America is haya-nare, which involves raw seafood and vinegared rice. But in Japan, there's an older form of sushi—said to be the original form—called funazushi. It's made from fermented carp sourced from one particular place, Lake Biwa, and takes about three years to produce from start to finish. The salt it's cured with keeps the bad bacteria at bay, and the result is said to taste like a fish version of prosciutto. Great Big Story recently caught up with Mariko Kitamura, the 18th generation to run her family’s shop in Takashima City, where she's one of the very few people left producing funazushi. You can learn more about the process behind the delicacy, and about Kitamura, in the video below.

nextArticle.image_alt|e
Bibo Barmaid
Bibo Barmaid Is Like a Keurig for Cocktails—and You Can Buy It Now
Bibo Barmaid
Bibo Barmaid

To make great-tasting cocktails at home, you could take a bartending class, or you could just buy a fancy gadget that does all the work for you. Imbibers interested in the hands-off approach should check out Bibo Barmaid, a cocktail maker that works like a Keurig machine for booze.

According to Supercall, all you need to turn the Bibo Barmaid system into your personal mixologist is a pouch of liquor and a pouch of cocktail flavoring. Bibo's liquor options include vodka, whiskey, rum, and agave spirit (think tequila), which can be paired with flavors like cucumber melon, rum punch, appletini, margarita, tangerine paloma, and mai tai.

After choosing your liquor and flavor packets, insert them into the machine, press the button, and watch as it dilutes the mixture and pours a perfect single portion of your favorite drink into your glass—no muddlers or bar spoons required.

Making cocktails at home usually means investing in a lot of equipment and ingredients, which isn't always worth it if you're preparing a drink for just yourself or you and a friend. With Bibo, whipping up a cocktail isn't much harder than pouring yourself a glass of wine.

Bibo Barmaid is now available on Amazon for $240, and cocktail mixes are available on Bibo's website starting at $35 for 18 pouches. The company is working on rolling out its liquor pouches in liquor stores and other alcohol retailers across the U.S.

[h/t Supercall]

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER
More from mental floss studios