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Warren Richardson, Australia, 2015, "Hope for a New Life"

Check Out the Winners of the 2016 World Press Photo Contest

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Warren Richardson, Australia, 2015, "Hope for a New Life"

For the past 59 years, the World Press Photo Foundation has chosen the year's best photographs taken by journalists around the world. This year, the foundation's jury sifted through 82,951 images from 5775 photographers to pick the recently-announced winners, according to Colossal.

In most of the categories—Contemporary Life, Daily Life, General News, Nature, People, Sports, Spot News—the judges chose six images. (Three were selected from the Long Term Projects category.) The group also awarded the World Press Photo of the Year to Australian-born, Eastern European-based photographer Warren Richardson for his photo (above) of men passing a baby under a razor-wire fence at the Hungarian-Serbian border this past summer. The photo, titled Hope For a New Life, also won first prize in the Spot News category.

Richardson told World Press Photo in a statement that he had already been camping with the refugees for five days when the photograph was taken. "It was around three o’clock in the morning and you can’t use a flash while the police are trying to find these people," he said. "So I had to use the moonlight alone."

Check out a few of the honorees below, and to see all of the photographs, head over to the World Press Photo contest page.

ZHANG LEE // HAZE IN CHINA

Contemporary Issues, first prize singles
China, Commissioned by Tianjin Daily
"A city in northern China shrouded in haze, Tianjin, China, 10 December 2015."

KEVIN FRAYER // CHINA'S COAL ADDICTION

Daily Life, 1st prize singles
Canada, Commissioned by Getty Images
"Chinese men pull a tricycle in a neighborhood next to a coal-fired power plant in Shanxi, China, on 26 November 2015."

CHRISTIAN WALGRAM // FIS WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS

Sports, 1st prize singles
Austria, Commissioned by GEPA pictures
"Czech Republic's Ondrej Bank crashes during the downhill race of the Alpine Combined at the FIS World Championships in Beaver Creek, Colorado, USA, on 15 February 2015."

ROHAN KELLY // STORM FRONT ON BONDI BEACH

Nature, 1st prize singles
Australia, Commissioned by Daily Telegraph
"A massive 'cloud tsunami' looms over Sydney as a sunbather reads, oblivious to the approaching cloud on Bondi Beach, Sydney, Australia on 06 November 2015."

TIM LAMAN // TOUGH TIMES FOR ORANGUTANS

Nature, 1st prize stories
USA
"A Sumatran orangutan threatens another nearby male in the Batang Toru Forest, North Sumatra Province, Indonesia,17 March 2014."

SERGEY PONOMAREV // REPORTING EUROPE'S REFUGEE CRISIS

General News, 1st prize stories
Russia, Commissioned by The New York Times
"Refugees arrive by boat near the village of Skala on Lesbos, Greece, 16 November 2015."

ANUAR PATJANE FLORIUK // WHALE WHISPERERS

Nature, 2nd prize singles
Mexico
"Divers observe and surround a humpback whale and her newborn calf whilst they swim around Roca Partida in the Revillagigedo Islands, Mexico, 28 January 2015."

DANIEL OCHOA DE OLZA // LA MAYA TRADITION

People, 2nd prize stories
Spain, Commissioned by The Associated Press
"Young girls between the age of 7 and 11 are chosen every year as 'Maya' for the 'Las Mayas', a festival derived from pagan rites celebrating the arrival of spring, in the town of Colmenar Viejo, Spain. The girls are required to sit still for a couple of hours in a decorated altar."

[h/t Colossal]

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Matt Cardy/Getty Images
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pretty pictures
Check Out These Images of Last Night's Spectacular Harvest Moon
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Matt Cardy/Getty Images

Each year, a special moon comes calling around the autumnal equinox: the Harvest Moon. The Harvest Moon—the full moon that falls nearest to the equinox—rises near sunset for several days in a row, making early evenings extra-bright for a few days when farmers traditionally reveled in the extra-long twilight while harvesting their crops at the end of the summer season. And because the moon looks larger and more orange when it's near the horizon, it's particularly spectacular as it rises.

The Harvest Moon
Matt Cardy/Getty Images

October 5 marked 2017’s Harvest Moon, and you may have noticed an extra spectacular sky if you were looking up last night. It's rare for the Harvest Moon to come so late in the year: The last time it came in October was in 2009. (Last year's fell on September 16, 2016.) Here are a few luminous lunar pictures from the event, some of which make the moon look totally unreal:

And if you missed seeing the event yourself, don't worry too much: the moon will still look full for several days.

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Adobe
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Live Smarter
With Help From Photoshop and AI, No One Will Know You Blinked in That Photo
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Adobe

After 15 minutes of posing for group photo after group photo, it looks like you’ve finally snapped the perfect one. Grandma is smiling, your nephew is sitting still, and even the dog is looking at the camera for once. Then, you find yourself in the corner: The shutter managed to capture the exact moment you blinked. Time to resume the positions.

With a new tool from Adobe, this scenario could become less common. Instead of retaking a picture every time someone closes their eyes, this feature would let you salvage the “ruined” photograph with a few clicks in Photoshop, Gizmodo reports.

The latest update of Photoshop Elements allows users to select the “Open Closed Eyes” option, choose which face in the photo they want to correct, and provide several additional photos of the subject with their eyes open. The software uses artificial intelligence to analyze each picture and determine which pair of peepers best matches the colors and lighting from the primary photograph. It then automatically pastes those eyes over the lids and blends them to make the addition look seamless.

Photoshop Elements (a simplified version of Adobe’s original image editor) offers many features that use AI algorithms to improve picture quality. Elements can automatically generate backgrounds when you move objects in a photo, suggest the best effects, and turn frowns into smiles. It even remembers the look you prefer and suggests personalized tone corrections. All of those capabilities and the new “Open Closed Eyes” tool are available today to customers who purchase Photoshop Elements 2018 for $100 (or upgrade their existing license for $80).

[h/t Gizmodo]

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