The 4 Most Interesting Comics of the Week

Image credit: 
Zander Cannon // Oni Press
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Every week I write about the most interesting new comics hitting comic shops, bookstores, digital, and the web. Feel free to comment below if there's a comic you've read recently that you want to talk about or an upcoming comic that you'd like me to consider highlighting.

1. Kaijumax Season 1

By Zander Cannon
Oni Press

Zander Cannon // Oni Press

Kaijumax is one of the most off-the-wall concepts to get published in recent memory. It’s basically Orange is the New Black but with Kaiju, set on a Pacific Island that has been transformed into a massive Supermax-style prison. The prisoners are the type of giant monsters you see in classic Japanese monster films, and the guards wear Ultraman-style suits that allow them to grow to monster-height when they need to step in and rough up a prisoner. In this ongoing series, Zander Cannon takes every Hollywood prison trope and adds in every Japanese monster movie trope: the guard dealing drugs to prisoners (in this case, radioactive isotopes); the uncomfortable prison shower scene (in this case, the shower is a waterfall); and the prisoner who has found religion (in this case, a Mechagodzilla preaching the word of technology).

Cannon is a skilled cartoonist who draws in a colorful, cartoony style that may mislead some parents into thinking this is a kid-friendly book (it’s not). His drawings offset the sometimes heavy content and, most of all, it playfully captures the man-in-rubber-suit spirit of those old monster films. Kaijumax recently completed serialization of “Season One" and it hits stores in an affordable collected edition this week.

2. Big Kids

By Michael DeForge
Drawn & Quarterly

Michael DeForge // Drawn & Quarterly

In Michael DeForge’s latest graphic novel, Big Kids, a teenage boy wakes up after being dumped by his boyfriend and starts to see the world as a place where he and everyone around him are actually trees (or, DeForge’s psychedelic, nearly unrecognizable version of trees). As a “tree”, the young teen has heightened senses and experiences mundane activities like swimming in a public pool with a euphoric state of awareness. People who used to cause problems in his life are now inconsequential “twigs.” However, with all of this new capacity for understanding, memories of his life before he “treed” are fading quickly.

Printed in a tiny 4 inch by 6 inch hardcover with eye-popping colors set against delicate lines, the book is trippy and surreal, containing DeForge’s typical preoccupations with nature, transformation, and the beauty and horror of living within your own body. It’s a metaphor for puberty and growing up that is poignant but also not afraid to portray its young protagonist as self-involved.

3. Octopus Pie Vol. 1

By Meredith Gran
Image Comics

Meredith Gran // Image Comics

Meredith Gran’s long-running Octopus Pie is one of the most popular and influential webcomics to come out of the 2000s, an important decade in the maturation of that format in which creators like Gran, Kate Beaton, Ryan North, Danielle Corsetto and others found large audiences online by self-publishing. At that time, mainstream book publishers began scooping up quirky small press and web comics, looking for the next big hit, only to very quickly give up when sales couldn't reach the threshold they were used to. Octopus Pie was originally caught in this publishing net when Villard Books put out a collection in 2010, but decided not to collect the subsequent strips.

This time out, Gran is moving her book to Image Comics, the premier publisher of creator-owned comics. Image has been pushing out of their usual boundaries of sci-fi, horror, and crime comics with selections like this. Octopus Pie follows the (semi-fictional) Brooklyn-based adventures of sarcastic Eve and happy-go-lucky stoner Hannah who were in pre-school together and are reunited by Eve’s mom to become roommates after Eve breaks up with her boyfriend. This first volume collects the first two years of strips with stories involving hipster art scenes, crazy exes, and witty observations about being at an age when adulthood becomes reality.

4. Superman: The Coming of the Supermen #1

By Neal Adams, Tony Bedard and Alex Sinclair
DC Comics

DC Comics

When Neal Adams came along in the 1960s, his realistic drawing style—influenced more by traditional figurative illustrators like Robert McGinnis than by traditional cartoony comic book artists—was a revelation. If you grew up reading comics in the 1970s, you’re probably familiar with Adams, particularly his iconic run on comics like Batman and Green Lantern/Green Arrow.

At 74, Adams is still working and is given carte blanche by DC Comics to do the occasional project of his choice. This includes 2011’s Batman: Odyssey, a deeply odd, almost incomprehensible exploration of Batman’s history featuring flying dinosaurs and a fourth-wall breaking Bruce Wayne. It garnered its fair share of scathing, bewildered reviews.

This time, with the six-issue series Superman: The Coming of the Supermen, Adams is playing in the Superman sandbox along with some of Jack Kirby’s creations like Darkseid and Kalibak. The oddness of Odyssey may be dialed down a little with this book, but it still looks like it's going to be pretty weird (for example, Superman and Darkseid intermingle with modern Middle East affairs).

While Adams’ late-era period may threaten to alter public opinion of his work, Comixology is running a sale this week of his classic work from the ‘70s if you want to see how he changed comics forever.

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February 25, 2016 - 4:00am
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