Virginia Tech via Stanford Center on Longevity
Virginia Tech via Stanford Center on Longevity

This End Table Design Concept Doubles as an At-Home Gym for Seniors

Virginia Tech via Stanford Center on Longevity
Virginia Tech via Stanford Center on Longevity

Physical activity is just as important—if not more important—in your old age as it is throughout the rest of your life. But for many elderly people, the act of going to a gym is either unappealing or impossible. This compact workout station was designed to provide seniors with an exercise alternative right in the comfort of their own home.

According to Fast Company, the dynamic table was created by a team of industrial design students at Virginia Tech as part of the Stanford Center on Longevity's third annual Design Challenge. The invention, called Veevo, resembles a basic end table when it's not in use. To transform it into a piece of exercise equipment, seniors can simply pull on the handle and unfold its components. The chair is meant for low-impact, seated exercise, and its seat opens up to reveal a compartment for storing weights and yoga equipment. From beneath the chair, a step stool pulls out and can be used for more intense activities, and a handrail lifts out from the side to lend support.

Virginia Tech via Stanford Center on Longevity

The concept was partly inspired by a team member's grandmother, who had broken her wrist after falling and lost the ability to care for herself for several weeks. Looking to promote independence in the elderly, the team decided to take a proactive approach toward dealing with debilitating falls. According to the Centers for Disease Control, one in three men and one in two women stop exercising completely by age 75. A compact home gym could give seniors who might have remained sedentary a convenient way to improve their strength and balance.

Veevo is one of 12 finalists currently competing in Stanford's challenge, which looks at student-designed projects that promote healthier, longer lives. If their concept wins, the students hope to one day make their product a reality for the seniors who could benefit from it.

[h/t Fast Company]

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Tom Etherington, Penguin Press
The Covers of Jack Kerouac's Classic Titles Are Getting a Makeover
Tom Etherington, Penguin Press
Tom Etherington, Penguin Press

Readers have been enjoying classic Jack Kerouac books like The Dharma Bums and On the Road for decades, but starting this August the novels will have a new look. Several abstract covers have been unveiled as part of Penguin’s "Great Kerouac" series, according to design website It’s Nice That.

The vibrant covers, designed by Tom Etherington of Penguin Press, feature the works of abstract expressionist painter Franz Kline. The artwork is intended to capture “the experience of reading Kerouac” rather than illustrating a particular scene or character, Etherington told It’s Nice That. Indeed, abstract styles of artwork seem a fitting match for Kerouac’s “spontaneous prose”—a writing style that was influenced by improvisational jazz music.

This year marks the 60th anniversary of The Dharma Bums, which was published just one year after On the Road. The Great Kerouac series will be available for purchase on August 2.

[h/t It's Nice That]

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Apple
Here's a Preview of the 70 New Emojis Coming to Your iPhone
Apple
Apple

Get ready to add a whole new set of symbols to your emoji vocabulary. As CNN reports, Apple has released a sneak peak of some of the 70 new emojis coming to iOS in late 2018.

In February 2018, the Unicode Consortium announced the latest additions to their official emoji database. Software makers have since been working on customizing the designs for their own operating systems, and now iPhone and iPad users are getting a preview of what the new emojis will look like on their devices.

One of the most highly anticipated new symbols is the redhead emoji, something people have been demanding for a while. A curly haired option, another popular request, will be added to the line-up, as will gray-hair and bald emoji choices. Each of the new hair types can be added to the classic face emoji regardless of gender, but when it comes to specific characters like the bride or the jogger emojis, users will be limited to the same hair options they had before.

If Apple users ever want to express their inner superhero, two new super characters, a man and woman, will let them do so. They will also have new "smiley" symbols to choose from, like a party emoji, a sad eyes emoji, and a frozen emoji.

In the food category you have a head of lettuce and a mango, and for dessert, a cupcake and a mooncake—a festive Chinese pastry. New animals include a peacock, a kangaroo, and a lobster. The lobster emoji stirred some controversy in February when Mainers noticed the Unicode version was missing a set of legs. The design was quickly revised, and Apple's version is also anatomically correct.

These images just show a small sample of the emojis that will be included in an iOS update planned for later in 2018. Users will have to wait to see the final designs for other the symbols on the list.

New Apple emojis.
Apple

New Apple emojis.
Apple

New Apple emojis.
Apple

New Apple emojis.
Apple

[h/t CNN]

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