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11 Lucky Facts About Dirty Harry

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Nearly 45 years ago, Clint Eastwood and director Don Siegel changed action cinema forever with Dirty Harry, a brutal crime drama about a take-no-prisoners cop who also gets the dirtiest jobs in his city, and the killer he’s trying to bring down. The film was a massive box office hit, divided critics with its apparent political messages, and made Eastwood into the biggest movie star in the world.

Now, if you’re feeling lucky, here are 11 facts about the iconic film ... punk.

1. IT ORIGINALLY HAD A DIFFERENT TITLE.

Though it’s hard to imagine the film not being identified so strongly by its title character now, back when Dirty Harry was just a developing screenplay by the husband and wife team of Harry Julian Fink and R.M. Fink, it was known as Dead Right.

2. FRANK SINATRA WAS SET TO STAR.

The idea that anyone but Clint Eastwood could play Harry Callahan seems strange, but a number of other stars were considered for the title role first, among them Steve McQueen, Robert Mitchum, and Frank Sinatra. Sinatra was actually attached to the film at one point, but pulled out because of an injury to his hand. So Eastwood stepped in, and the rest is history.

3. IT WAS ORIGINALLY SET IN NEW YORK.

The original script called for Callahan to be a tough New York City cop, but by the time Eastwood came onboard, and re-teamed with director Don Siegel (they’d already made three films together, including The Beguiled), it was decided that the setting should be San Francisco, a city both men loved.

4. AUDIE MURPHY WAS ALMOST THE VILLAIN.

Siegel made the interesting choice of approaching World War II hero-turned-actor Audie Murphy for the role of the sadistic killer known as “Scorpio.” It’s still not clear if Murphy ever considered taking the role, because he died in a plane crash before filming began.

5. TERRENCE MALICK WORKED ON THE SCRIPT.

Though Eastwood and Siegel ultimately stuck close to the original script by the Finks, Dirty Harry went through several rewrites before making it to the screen. Among the screenwriters to take uncredited shots at the script was a young Terrence Malick, who had not yet had his breakthrough feature film debut with Badlands.

6. CLINT EASTWOOD’S DIRECTORIAL DEBUT MAKES A CAMEO.

While filming Dirty Harry, Eastwood was on the verge of releasing his first film as a director, Play Misty for Me, and the film actually makes a small appearance in the adventures of Harry Callahan. During the iconic bank robbery scene, as Harry crosses the street—under the shower of an exploded fire hydrant—to confront the final robber (and say his famous “Well, do ya, punk?” line), a theater marquee advertising Play Misty for Me is visible in the background.

7. EASTWOOD DID HIS OWN STUNTS.

For the scene in which Harry chases down Scorpio, who has kidnapped a busload of children, the character is required to leap from a trestle bridge onto the top of the moving bus. If you watch the scene carefully, you’ll notice that it’s not a stuntman making the leap. Eastwood did it himself.

8. EASTWOOD DIRECTED ONE SCENE HIMSELF.

During one night of shooting, Siegel had to miss work because of the flu, leaving the production without a director. So Eastwood took over. The scene in which Harry confronts a suicidal man on the roof of a building was directed by Eastwood.

9. THE FAMOUS FINAL SCENE ALMOST DIDN’T HAPPEN.

After dispatching Scorpio in the film’s final moments, Harry takes out his badge and tosses it into the nearby water. Eastwood was initially very uncomfortable with this, fearing that it would signify to the audience that Harry was definitely quitting police work for good. Siegel argued that it instead meant that Callahan was simply frustrated with the policing system that made it so hard for him to get rid of the killer in the first place, but decided to compromise. The director told Eastwood that he could simply draw back his arm as if he were about to throw the badge before thinking twice and putting it back in his pocket. Eventually, though, Eastwood came around to Siegel’s point of view, and threw the badge.

10. CRITICS WERE NOT BIG FANS AT FIRST.

Though it’s now regarded as a classic action film, many prominent critics weren’t kind to Dirty Harry upon its initial release, particularly because they felt it glorified Harry’s particular brand of rule-breaking, bigoted policing. Newsweek called the film a “right-wing fantasy,” while legendary New Yorker critic Pauline Kael infamously dubbed it “fascist medievalism.”

11. IT INSPIRED A REAL COPYCAT CRIME.

In the film, Scorpio abducts a young girl and buries her alive, then demands ransom money from police. Apparently, this plot actually inspired a real crime. In 2009, a German couple was put on trial for the 1981 abduction and burial of a young girl after an informant turned them in. Reports from the court case revealed that they demanded ransom for her safety, and got the idea from Dirty Harry.

Additional Sources:
Clint: The Life and Legend
, by Patrick McGilligan
American Rebel: The Life of Clint Eastwood
, by Marc Eliot

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Mata Hari: Famous Spy or Creative Storyteller?
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Nearly everyone has heard of Mata Hari, one of the most cunning and seductive spies of all time. Except that statement isn't entirely true. Cunning and seductive, yes. Spy? Probably not. 

Margaretha Geertruida Zelle was the eldest daughter of a hat store owner who was quite wealthy thanks to some savvy oil investments.  When her mother died, her father remarried and shuffled his children off to various relatives. To escape, an 18-year-old Margaretha answered an ad in the paper that might have read something like this: "Dutch Colonial Army Captain Seeks Wife. Compatibility not important. Must not mind blatant infidelity or occasional beatings."

She had two children with Captain Rudolf MacLeod, but they did nothing to improve the marriage. He brazenly kept a mistress and a concubine; she moved in with another officer. Again, probably looking to escape her miserable existence, Margaretha spent her time in Java (where the family had relocated for Captain MacLeod's job) becoming part of the culture, learning all about the dance and even earning a dance name bestowed upon her by the locals—"Mata Hari," which meant "eye of the day" or "sun."

Her son died after being poisoned by an angry servant (so the MacLeods believed).

Margaretha divorced her husband, lost custody of her daughter and moved to Paris to start a new life for herself in 1903. Calling upon the dance skills she had learned in Java, the newly restyled Mata Hari became a performer, starting with the circus and eventually working her way up to exotic dancer. 

To make herself seem more mysterious and interesting, Mata Hari told people her mother was a Javanese princess who taught her everything she knew about the sacred religious dances she performed. The dances were almost entirely in the nude.

Thanks to her mostly-nude dancing and tantalizing background story, she was a hot commodity all over Europe. During WWI, this caught the attention of British Intelligence, who brought her in and demanded to know why she was constantly traipsing across the continent. Under interrogation, she apparently told them she was a spy for France—that she used her job as an exotic dancer to coerce German officers to give her information, which she then supplied back to French spymaster Georges Ladoux. No one could verify these claims and Mata Hari was released.

Not too long afterward, French intelligence intercepted messages that mentioned H-21, a spy who was performing remarkably well. Something in the messages reminded the French officers of Mata Hari's tale and they arrested her at her hotel in Paris on February 13, 1917, under suspicion of being a double agent.

Mata Hari repeatedly denied all involvement in any spying for either side. Her captors didn't believe her story, and perhaps wanting to make an example of her, sentenced her to death by firing squad. She was shot to death 100 years ago today, on October 15, 1917.

In 1985, one of her biographers convinced the French government to open their files on Mata Hari. He says the files contained not one shred of evidence that she was spying for anyone, let alone the enemy. Whether the story she originally told British intelligence was made up by them or by her to further her sophisticated and exotic background is anyone's guess. 

Or maybe she really was the ultimate spy and simply left no evidence in her wake.

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German Police Tried to Fine Someone $1000 for Farting at Them
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In Berlin, passing gas can cost you. Quite a lot, actually, in the case of a man accused of disrespecting police officers by releasing a pair of noxious farts while being detained by the police. As CityLab reports, Berlin’s police force has recently been rocked by a scandal hinging on the two farts of one man who was asked to show his ID to police officers while partying on an evening in February 2016.

The man in question was accused of disrespecting the officers involved by aiming his flatulence at a policewoman, and was eventually slapped with a fine of 900 euros ($1066) in what local media called the "Irrer-Pups Prozess," or "Crazy Toot Trial." The errant farter was compelled to show up for court in September after refusing to pay the fine. A judge dismissed the case in less than 10 minutes.

But the smelly situation sparked a political scandal over the police resources wasted over the non-crime. It involved 18 months, 23 public officials, and 17 hours of official time—on the taxpayers’ dime. Officials estimate that those two minor toots cost taxpayers more than $100, which is chump change in terms of city budgets, but could have been used to deal with more pressing criminal issues.

[h/t CityLab]

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