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12 World-Class Museums You Can Visit Online

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Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images

While it’s hard to beat the experience of seeing a seminal piece of fine art or important historical artifact with your own two eyes, one could easily spend a lifetime traveling the world in search of all of them. Fortunately, the digital age has made it possible—easy, even—to visit some of the world’s most famous museums from the comfort of your own home. Here are a dozen of them.

1. THE LOUVRE

The Louvre is not only one of the world’s largest art museums, but it’s also one of Paris’ most iconic historic monuments. The museum offers free online tours of some of its most important and popular exhibits, such as its Egyptian Antiquities. You can take a 360-degree look at the museum, and click around the rare artifacts to get additional information on their histories.

2. SOLOMON R. GUGGENHEIM MUSEUM

While the architecture of the Guggenheim’s building itself, designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, is quite impressive, you don’t have to visit the Big Apple to get an up-close view of some of the priceless pieces of artwork inside. The museum makes some of its collections and exhibits available online for people and students who want to get a taste of what the museum can offer, including works from Franz Marc, Piet Mondrian, Pablo Picasso, and Jeff Koons. 

3. NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART

Founded in 1937, National Gallery of Art is free and open to the general public. For those who aren’t in Washington D.C., it also provides virtual tours of its gallery and exhibits, including “Van Gogh’s Van Goghs: Masterpieces from the Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam” and "Sculpture of Angkor and Ancient Cambodia: Millennium of Glory.”

4. BRITISH MUSEUM

With a collection that totals more than eight million objects, London’s British Museum makes some of its pieces viewable online, including "Kanga: Textiles From Africa" and "Objects From The Roman Cities of Pompeii and Herculaneum." The museum also teamed up with the Google Cultural Institute to offer virtual tours using Google Street View technology.

5. SMITHSONIAN NATIONAL MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY

Washington D.C.’s National Museum of Natural History, one of the most visited museums in the world, offers a peek at its wonderful treasures with an online virtual tour of the entire grounds. Viewers are welcomed into its rotunda and are greeted with a comprehensive room-by-room, 360-degree walking tour of all its exceptional exhibits, including the Hall of Mammals, Insect Zoo, and Dinosaurs and Hall of Paleobiology.   

6. THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART

The Met is home to over two million works of fine art, but you don’t have to be in New York City to enjoy them. The museum’s website features an online collection and virtual tours of some of its most impressive pieces, including works from Vincent van Gogh, Jackson Pollock, and Giotto di Bondone. In addition, The Met also works with the Google Cultural Institute to make even more artwork (that’s not featured in its own online collection) available for view.

7. DALÍ THEATRE-MUSEUM

Located in the town of Figueres in Catalonia, Spain, the Dalí Theatre-Museum is completely dedicated to the artwork of Salvador Dalí. It features many rooms and exhibits surrounding every era of Dalí’s life and career, and the artist himself is buried here. The museum offers virtual tours of the grounds and a few exhibits, such as the surreal display of Mae West's Face.

8. NASA

NASA offers free virtual tours of its Space Center in Houston, with a wise-cracking animated robot named “Audima” as your tour guide.

9. VATICAN MUSEUMS

The Vatican Museums feature an extensive collection of important art and classical sculptures curated by the Popes over many centuries. You can take a virtual tour of the museum grounds and iconic exhibits, including Michelangelo’s ceiling of The Sistine Chapel.

10. NATIONAL WOMEN'S HISTORY MUSEUM

The mission statement of the National Women’s History Museum in Alexandria, Virginia is to educate, inspire, empower, and shape the future “by integrating women’s distinctive history and culture in the United States.” Part of that mission is delivered through well-curated online exhibits, including exhibits surrounding women in World War II and the rights of women throughout American history.  

11. NATIONAL MUSEUM OF THE UNITED STATES AIR FORCE

The National Museum of the United States Air Force is the official museum of the United States Air Force and centered on Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Dayton, Ohio. It houses a wide array of military weapons and aircrafts, including the presidential airplanes of Franklin D. Roosevelt, Harry Truman, Dwight D. Eisenhower, John F. Kennedy, and Richard Nixon. The museum also offers free virtual tours of its entire grounds, such as decommissioned aircrafts from World War II, Vietnam, and the Korean War.

12. GOOGLE ART PROJECT

To help its users discover and view important artworks online in high resolution and detail, Google partnered with more than 60 museums and galleries from around the world to archive and document priceless pieces of art and to provide virtual tours of museums using Google Street View technology. The Google Art Project features fine art from the White House, the Museum of Islamic Art in Qatar, and even São Paulo street art from Brazil. Check out a complete list of museums you can visit online through the Google Art Project and the Google Cultural Institute.

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This Just In
Australians Vote to Name New Sydney Harbor Boat 'Ferry McFerryface'
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NSW Transport

Proving that some jokes never die (or at least take a little longer to reach the Land Down Under), Sydney has a new ferry named Ferry McFerryface, according to BBC News.

For the uninitiated, the name Ferry McFerryface pays homage to an English practical joke from 2016. It all started when the UK's Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) made global headlines after launching an online poll to name a nearly $300 million polar research ship. Leading the vote by a significant margin was the moniker “Boaty McBoatface.”

For a short period, it seemed as though jokesters would pull off their naming coup. But once the competition reached its end, government officials ultimately decided to override the poll. They named the research ship RSS Sir David Attenborough instead, although they did agree to give the name Boaty McBoatface to one of its submarines.

Sydney recently held a similar competition to name a fleet of six new harbor ferries, and the results were announced in mid-November. Locals submitted more than 15,000 names, and winning submissions included the names of esteemed Australian doctors, prominent Aboriginal Australians, and—yes—Ferry McFerryface, according to the Associated Press. Boaty McBoatface also came out on top, but it was struck down.

“Given ‘Boaty’ was already taken by another vessel, we’ve gone with the next most popular name nominated by Sydneysiders,” said Andrew Constance, the New South Wales minister for transport and infrastructure, in a statement. “Ferry McFerryface will be the harbor’s newest icon and I hope it brings a smile to the faces of visitors and locals alike.”

[h/t BBC News]

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Can You Get to the Bottom of This Coffee Brainteaser?
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iStock

Is your brain awake and energized? If not, you may want to grab a cup of coffee to figure out this head-scratching puzzle.

According to IFL Science, the brainteaser was shared by Twitter user @_herbeautyxo and has been stumping web users ever since. The image shows coffee being poured into a network of pipes and boxes. It seems there are four places the liquid could end up and each is represented by a numbered cup. Based on the shape and arrangement of the pathways, you have to guess which vessel will catch the coffee first.

Plenty of users had guesses, but few of them answered correctly. But once you know what to look for, the puzzle becomes deceptively simple (scroll down if you want to find out the answer). 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Three of the four pipes are blocked off, so the only possible spot for the coffee to exit from is the remaining pipe above cup five.

Your brain doesn’t always interpret what you see in front of you accurately, even when it’s given a caffeine boost. If you need more evidence, check out these award-winning optical illusions and brain puzzles.

[h/t IFL Science]

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