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YouTuber Programs Retro Video Game 'Snake' Into a Keyboard

Introduced in the 1970s and reborn in the 1990s thanks to Nokia mobile phones, the video game Snake allows players to move pixels around a plane to "eat" intermittently moving dots. As the game progresses, the snake grows larger, which makes avoiding obstacles—including its own body—even harder. Traditionally, the game is played on a screen with a directional pad as the controller, but as the video above from Kotaku shows, one gamer recently tried a different technique: using only a keyboard as both the screen and the controller.

YouTuber Mythic Magic used the programming language C# to turn his Corsair K70 RGB gaming keyboard into a platform for Snake. The gamer takes advantage of the multicolor backlighting so that it forms each element, including the borders, the moving dot, and the growing snake. Mythic Magic has uploaded his source codes to GitHub for anyone familiar with the language to mimic this project.

The Corsair website advertises the keyboard as having "virtually unlimited customization" capabilities, and Mythic Magic's project definitely put that to the test. 

Banner image via Mythic Magic on YouTube

[h/t Kotaku]

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The Design Tricks That Make Smartphones Addictive—And How to Fight Them
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Two and a half billion people worldwide—and 77 percent of Americans—have smartphones, which means you probably have plenty of company in your inability to go five minutes without checking your device. But as a new video from Vox points out, it's not that we all lack self-control: Your phone is designed down to the tiniest details to keep you as engaged as possible. Vox spoke to Tristan Harris, a former Google design ethicist, who explains how your push notifications, the "pull to refresh" feature of certain apps (inspired by slot machines), and the warm, bright colors on your phone are all meant to hook you. Fortunately, he also notes there's things you can do to lessen the hold, from the common sense (limit your notifications) to the drastic (go grayscale). Watch the whole thing to learn all the dirty details—and then see how long you can spend without looking at your phone.

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New Lobster Emoji Gets Updated After Mainers Noticed It Was Missing a Set of Legs
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Emojipedia

When the Unicode Consortium released the designs of the latest batch of emojis in early February, the new lobster emoji was an instant hit. But as some astute observers have pointed out, Unicode forgot something crucial from the initial draft: a fourth set of legs.

As Mashable reports, Unicode has agreed to revise its new lobster emoji to make it anatomically accurate. The first version of the emoji, which Maine senator Angus King had petitioned for in September 2017, shows what looks like a realistic take on a lobster, complete with claws, antennae, and a tail. But behind the claws were only three sets of walking legs, or "pereiopods." In reality, lobsters have four sets of pereiopods in addition to their claws.

"Sen. Angus King from Maine has certainly been vocal about his love of the lobster emoji, but was kind enough to spare us the indignity of pointing out that we left off two legs," Jeremy Burge, chief emoji officer at Emojipedia and vice-chair of the Unicode Emoji Subcommittee, wrote in a blog post. Other Mainers weren't afraid to speak up. After receiving numerous complaints about the oversight, Unicode agreed to tack two more legs onto the lobster emoji in time for its release later this year.

The skateboard emoji (which featured an outdated design) and the DNA emoji (which twisted the wrong way) have also received redesigns following complaints.

[h/t Mashable]

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