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You Could Soon Get Inked at a Whole Foods Market Store

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There are 83.1 million Millennials in the U.S.—and Whole Foods Market wants them to buy groceries, visit the barber, and even get tattooed at one of their stores.

According to Bloomberg, the organic supermarket chain hopes to attract young shoppers by adding a host of third-party vendors to their brand-new 365 by Whole Foods Market stores (which, by the way, will also be smaller and less expensive). The program is called Friends of 365, and it will offer customers services they can’t normally get at Whole Foods Market—or any other grocery store, for that matter.

Friends of 365 may be any type of business—from food and drinks to fashion, body care products, services, and more. (Record shop? Tattoo parlor? Maybe!) And each 365 store may have a different mix of friends. The more variety, the merrier!" the company says on its website. Bottom line? If you’ve ever wanted to simultaneously shop for a new bike and organic quinoa or get your knives sharpened while enjoying a quick coffee, you'll soon have your chance.

Whole Foods recently signed five more leases for 365 by Whole Foods Market stores, rounding out the current total to 13. They’ll soon be available in Evergreen Park, Illinois; Gainesville, Florida; Bellevue, Washington; Cincinnati, Ohio; Houston and Cedar Park, Texas; Lake Oswego, Oregon (just outside Portland); and in several California locations, including San Francisco, Santa Monica, Concord, and Claremont. Three stores will launch in 2016, and the remaining 10 will open their doors in 2017.

While People reports that the first outpost isn't slated to open until May, the vendors will reportedly be announced by February 28. In the meantime, keep an eye out for the hybrid establishment if you live in Los Angeles's Silver Lake neighborhood: The first 365 by Whole Foods will soon grace a storefront near you.

[h/t Bloomberg]

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Don't Have Space For a Christmas Tree? Decorate a Pineapple Instead
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Christmas trees aren't for everyone. Some people can't fit a fir inside their cramped abodes, while others are turned off by the expense, or by the idea of bugs hitchhiking their way inside. Fake trees are always an option, but a new trend sweeping Instagram—pineapples as mini-Christmas "trees"—might convince you to forego the forest vibe for a more tropical aesthetic.

As Thrillist reports, the pineapple-as-Christmas-tree idea appears to have originated on Pinterest before it, uh, ripened into a social media sensation. Transforming a pineapple into a Halloween “pumpkin” requires carving and tea lights, but to make the fruit festive for Christmas all one needs are lights, ornaments, swaths of garland, and any other tiny tchotchkes that remind you of the holidays. The final result is a tabletop decoration that's equal parts Blue Hawaii and Miracle on 34th Street.

In need of some decorating inspiration? Check out a variety of “Christmas tree” pineapples below.

[h/t Thrillist]

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A Pitless Avocado Wants to Keep You Safe From the Dreaded 'Avocado Hand'
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The humble avocado is a deceptively dangerous fruit. Some emergency room doctors have recently reported an uptick in a certain kind of injury—“avocado hand,” a knife injury caused by clumsily trying to get the pit out of an avocado with a knife. There are ways to safely pit an avocado (including the ones likely taught in your local knife skills class, or simply using a spoon), but there’s also another option. You could just buy one that doesn’t have a pit at all, as The Telegraph reports.

British retailer Marks & Spencer has started selling cocktail avocados, a skinny, almost zucchini-like type of avocado that doesn’t have a seed inside. Grown in Spain, they’re hard to find in stores (Marks & Spencer seems to be the only place in the UK to have them), and are only available during the month of December.

The avocados aren’t genetically modified, according to The Independent. They grow naturally from an unpollinated avocado blossom, and their growth is stunted by the lack of seed. Though you may not be able to find them in your local grocery, these “avocaditos” can grow wherever regular-sized Fuerte avocados grow, including Mexico and California, and some specialty producers already sell them in the U.S. Despite the elongated shape, they taste pretty much like any other avocado. But you don’t really need a knife to eat them, since the skin is edible, too.

If you insist on taking your life in your hand and pitting your own full-sized avocado, click here to let us guide you through the process. No one wants to go to the ER over a salad topping, no matter how delicious. Safety first!

[h/t The Telegraph]

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