CLOSE
Original image
Courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Photo © Nicholas Alan Cope

New Metropolitan Museum of Art Exhibit Explores the World of Fashion Tech

Original image
Courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Photo © Nicholas Alan Cope

No industry is immune to the changes that come with technology—not even fashion. But as an upcoming exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Costume Institute shows, that might be a good thing. The exhibit, Manus x Machina: Fashion in an Age of Technology, will feature over 120 ensembles, showcasing the dynamic between handcrafted and machine-made work in the ever-evolving fashion world.

Apple is sponsoring the show, and as Andrew Bolton, Curator in Charge at The Costume Institute, told Engadget, it's a perfect thematic fit: “Apple is really about craft, which is what the show’s about. Of course it's about technology, but it’s all about how the hand and the machine are coming together; the idea of craftsmanship, and how craftsmanship plays a role within the creative process at Apple. So in many ways, philosophically, they're the perfect partner for the exhibition.” 

Manus x Machina was inspired by the 1927 Fritz Lang film Metropolis, which Bolton described as a “dialectical treatise between the hand and the machine.” The ensembles in the exhibition range from a gown made in the 1880s to a 2015 Chanel wedding dress made out of scuba knit, complete with an embroidered train made by both human and machine hands. Some featured works were made using traditional techniques like featherwork and pleating, while others are the result of more cutting-edge methods like 3D printing, computer modeling, and ultrasonic welding.

The show opens on May 5 and will remain on display at The Costume Institute through August 14. Check out the preview below, and head to the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s website for more information.


Wedding ensemble, Karl Lagerfeld (French, born Hamburg, 1938) for House of Chanel 
(French, founded 1913), autumn/winter 2014–15 haute couture, back view; Courtesy of CHANEL Patrimoine Collection
Courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Photo © Nicholas Alan Cope

Suit, Gabrielle “Coco” Chanel (French, 1883– 1971), 1963–68 haute couture; The 
Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gift of Mrs. Lyn Revson, 1975 (1975.53.7a–e)

Courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Photo © Nicholas Alan Cope

Ensemble, Iris van Herpen (Dutch, born 1984), spring/summer 2010 haute couture; The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 
Purchase, Friends of The Costume Institute Gifts, 2015 (2016.16a, b)
Courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art,
Photo © Nicholas Alan Cope

Ensemble, Karl Lagerfeld (French, born Hamburg, 1938) for House of Chanel (French, 
founded 1913), autumn/winter 2015–2016 haute couture; Courtesy of CHANEL Patrimoine Collection
Courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Photo © Nicholas Alan Cope



Evening dress, Yves Saint Laurent (French, 1936-2008), autumn/winter 1969–70 haute couture; The Metropolitan 
Museum of Art, Gift of Baron Philippe de Rothschild, 1983 (1983.619.1a, b)
Courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art,
Photo © Nicholas Alan Cope


“Kaikoku” Floating Dress, Hussein Chalayan (British, born Cyprus, 1970), autumn/winter 2011–12;
Courtesy of Swarovski
Courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Photo © Nicholas Alan Cope

Wedding Ensemble, Karl Lagerfeld (French, born Hamburg, 1938) for House of Chanel (French, founded 1913), autumn/ winter 2005–6 haute couture; Courtesy of CHANEL Patrimoine Collection
Courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Photo © Nicholas Alan Cope

[h/t Dezeen]

Original image
Kehinde Wiley Studio, Inc., Wikimedia Commons // CC BY-SA 3.0
arrow
presidents
Barack Obama Taps Kehinde Wiley to Paint His Official Presidential Portrait
Original image
Kehinde Wiley
Kehinde Wiley Studio, Inc., Wikimedia Commons // CC BY-SA 3.0

Kehinde Wiley, an American artist known for his grand portraits of African-American subjects, has painted Michael Jackson, Ice-T, and The Notorious B.I.G. in his work. Now the artist will have the honor of adding Barack Obama to that list. According to the Smithsonian, the former president has selected Wiley to paint his official presidential portrait, which will hang in the National Portrait Gallery.

Wiley’s portraits typically depict black people in powerful poses. Sometimes he models his work after classic paintings, as was the case with "Napoleon Leading the Army Over the Alps.” The subjects are often dressed in hip-hop-style clothing and placed against decorative backdrops.

Portrait by Kehinde Wiley
"Le Roi a la Chasse"
Kehinde Wiley, Wikimedia Commons // CC BY 3.0

Smithsonian also announced that Baltimore-based artist Amy Sherald has been chosen by former first lady Michelle Obama to paint her portrait for the gallery. Like Wiley, Sherald uses her work to challenge stereotypes of African-Americans in art.

“The Portrait Gallery is absolutely delighted that Kehinde Wiley and Amy Sherald have agreed to create the official portraits of our former president and first lady,” Kim Sajet, director of the National Portrait Gallery, said in a press release. “Both have achieved enormous success as artists, but even more, they make art that reflects the power and potential of portraiture in the 21st century.”

The tradition of the president and first lady posing for portraits for the National Portrait Gallery dates back to George H.W. Bush. Both Wiley’s and Sherald’s pieces will be revealed in early 2018 as permanent additions to the gallery in Washington, D.C.

Original image
Made.com
arrow
Art
What the Homes of the Future Will Look Like, According to Kids
Original image
Made.com

Ask a futurist what the house of tomorrow will feature and she might mention automatic appliances and robot assistants. Ask a kid the same question and you’ll get answers that are slightly more creative, but not altogether impractical. That’s what Made.com discovered when they launched Homes of the Future, a project that had kids draw illustrations of futuristic homes that served as the basis for professional 3D renderings.

According to Co.Design, the UK-based furniture retailer recruited children ages 4 to 12 to submit their architectural ideas. The doodles, sketched in pen, marker, and colored pencil, showcase the grade-schoolers' imaginations. Paired with each picture is concept art made with a 3D illustrator that shows what the homes might look like in the real world.

The designs range from colorful and whimsical to coldly realistic. In one blueprint, drawn by Ameen, age 10, a neighborhood of rainbow buildings and flowers float among the clouds. Another sketch by Ellis, age 7, shows a “home built to last” with titanium, bricks, a steel roof, and bulletproof windows. Some kids seemed less concerned with durability than they were with the tastiness of the infrastructure. Cherry-flavored bricks, candy windows, and a giant jelly slide were just some of the features built into the future homes. Sustainability was also a major theme, with solar panels appearing on two of the houses.

Check out the original artwork and the 3D versions of their ideas below.

House of the future drawn by kid.

House of the future drawn by kid.

House of the future drawn by kid.

House of the future.

House of the future.

House of the future.

House of the future.

House of the future.

House of the future.

House of the future.

[h/t Co.Design]

All images courtesy of Made.com.

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER
More from mental floss studios