Claudio Martino and Takeaway via Wikimedia Commons // CC BY-SA 4.0
Claudio Martino and Takeaway via Wikimedia Commons // CC BY-SA 4.0

Italy’s “Coffee Pot King” Was Laid to Rest in the Iconic Invention

Claudio Martino and Takeaway via Wikimedia Commons // CC BY-SA 4.0
Claudio Martino and Takeaway via Wikimedia Commons // CC BY-SA 4.0

Renato Bialetti dedicated his life to the Moka Express coffee pot. Now, in death, the businessman will maintain close ties to the appliance. On February 15, Bialetti's ashes were laid to rest in an oversized coffee maker, Quartz reports.

Bialetti was born an heir to a burgeoning coffee pot empire, reports Italian website The Local. His father, aluminum vendor Alfonso Bialetti, first bought the Moka pot’s design from an inventor in the 1930s. The elder Bialetti patented the design—an aluminum coffee pot with a Bakelite handle. It would go on to become the famous family business.

Sales were slow until Renato took over in the 1940s. He focused his attention on branding, not sales, and began labeling each Moka pot with L’omino coi baffi—the little man with a mustache that’s so familiar today. With one big marketing campaign, Renato turned the Moka pot into a household fixture, first in Italy, and then around the world. Today, the Bialettis' company has sold hundreds of millions of coffee pots, and the pot itself has been exhibited in design museums.

Renato Bialetti died last week at the age of 93. To honor his passion, Bialetti’s family decided to have his ashes interred in an enormous Moka Express. You can watch a short clip of Bialetti’s funeral mass in the video below.

Bialetti is not the first legend to be laid to rest in his life’s work. Fredric J. Baur invented the Pringles can in the 1960s. When he passed away in 2008, some of his ashes were buried in one of his creations.

[h/t Quartz]

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iStock
Drinking Up to Eight Cups of Coffee a Day Could Help You Live Longer
iStock
iStock

Good news for coffee fiends: That extra cup of joe in the afternoon could help you live longer, according to a new UK-based study spotted by Newsweek. Researchers determined that people who drink between one and eight cups of coffee per day may have a lower chance of death, regardless of whether their bodies are able to metabolize caffeine well.

To reach these conclusions, the team of researchers analyzed data from the UK Biobank pertaining to the lifestyle choices, demographics, and genetic information of 500,000 people, 87 percent of whom were coffee drinkers. More than 14,000 participants died during the course of the study from 2006 to 2010, and an inverse relationship between coffee drinking and the risk of death was recorded.

These findings were published in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine, but scientists say more research is needed to determine the link between coffee and other health outcomes. A similar study last year by the European Society of Cardiology suggested that people who drink up to four cups of coffee a day are 64 percent less likely to die early than those who hardly drank coffee. Every two additional cups of coffee improved one’s odds of an extended life span by 22 percent, researchers determined.

However reassuring these results may be to latte lovers, public health specialist Robin Poole of the University of Southampton told Newsweek that this doesn’t necessarily mean non-coffee drinkers should suddenly start caffeinating. (Poole was not involved in the study.)

"We know that some people metabolize caffeine quite slowly and are less tolerant of the apparent physical affects of caffeine, which of course comes from many sources other than coffee,” Poole said. “Such people would be better to avoid too much coffee, or move toward decaffeinated choices, [which] this study has shown still have beneficial associations.”

[h/t Newsweek]

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Wacaco
This Tiny Espresso Machine Fits in Your Pocket and Keeps You Caffeinated Wherever You Go
Wacaco
Wacaco

If you've been putting off buying an espresso machine until you have the counter space, check out the Nanopresso from Wacaco. The gadget is smaller than most travel mugs, and it lets you brew hot, fresh coffee in even remote, electricity-free locations.

According to Bustle, Nanopresso operates through a hand-powered system. Just load water and your favorite blend of finely ground espresso in the right compartments, screw it back together, and pump the button on the side. Soon you'll have a shot of espresso you can squeeze directly into the detachable cup.

Hand holding a tiny espresso machine by a lake.
Wacaco

Nanopresso is an upgraded version of Wacaco's Minipresso. Weighing just 12 ounces, it's lighter than older models and requires 15 percent less force to pump it. This new device is perfect for the outdoors, whether you're planning a camping trip in the woods or a long day at the beach. But you don't need to be going off the grid to use one: You can keep it at home as an alternative to bulky, electric coffee machines, or bring one to your office so you can brew coffee at your desk.

Wacoco's Nanopresso is currently available on Amazon for $64.90. If you're planning to bring it outdoors this summer, check out these other smart camping essentials.

[h/t Bustle]

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