Helen Sloan/HBO
Helen Sloan/HBO

Sneak a Peek at the New Season of Game of Thrones

Helen Sloan/HBO
Helen Sloan/HBO

Winter is coming—though probably not fast enough for Game of Thrones fans, who have more than two months to wait until the series makes its much anticipated return to HBO on April 24. In the meantime, here's a sneak peek of the sixth season, in photos.

Maisie Williams as Arya Stark. Photo by Macall B. Polay/HBO

Peter Dinklage as Tyrion Lannister and Conleth Hill as Varys. Photo by Macall B. Polay/HBO

Emilia Clarke as Daenerys Targaryen. Photo by Macall B. Polay/HBO

John Bradley as Samwell Tarly and Hannah Murray as Gilly. Photo by Helen Sloan /HBO

Alfie Allen as Theon Greyjoy and Sophie Turner as Sansa Stark– photo Helen Sloan/HBO

Carice van Houten as Melisandre. Photo by Helen Sloan/HBO

Isaac Hempstead Wright as Bran Stark and Max von Sydow as the Three-Eyed Raven. Photo by Helen Sloan/HBO

Gwendoline Christie as Brienne of Tarth. Photo by Helen Sloan/HBO

Dean-Charles Chapman as King Tommen Baratheon, Nikolaj Coster-Waldau as Jaime Lannister and Nell Tiger Free as Myrcella Baratheon. Photo by Helen Sloan/HBO

Gemma Whelan as Yara Greyjoy. Photo by Helen Sloan/HBO

Hannah Waddingham as Septa Unella and Natalie Dormer as Margaery Tyrell. Photo by Helen Sloan/HBO

Jonathan Pryce as the High Sparrow. Photo by Helen Sloan/HBO

Nikolaj Coster-Waldau as Jaime Lannister. Photo by Helen Sloan/HBO

Nathalie Emmanuel as Missandei. Photo by Helen Sloan/HBO

Michael McElhatton as Roose Bolton and Iwan Rheon as Ramsay Bolton– photo Helen Sloan/HBO

Peter Dinklage as Tyrion Lannister. Photo by Macall B. Polay/HBO

Patrick Malahide as Balon Greyjoy. Photo by Helen Sloan/HBO

Liam Cunningham as Davos Seaworth– photo Helen Sloan/HBO
nextArticle.image_alt|e
iStock
Photographer's Amazing Snap of an Osprey Is Holding Two Big Surprises
iStock
iStock

As a wildlife photographer, Doc Jon understands the importance of being in the right place at the right time. But it took getting home and really squinting at his own work to realize that he recently captured a “one-in-a-trillion shot” while taking a photo of an osprey in Madeira Beach, Florida. While demonstrating the power of his lens to a fellow beach-goer, Jon pointed his camera at an osprey flying about 400 feet above their heads, and snapped a quick photo.

“I started shooting and my settings were off,” Jon told Fstoppers. “I had no tripod. I was trying to hold it steady, but it was windy out," he said. "I could see the osprey had a fish, but it was far away. It wasn't until I got home, cropped in on it, lightened the shadows, and applied some sharpening that I suddenly saw. ‘Oh my god, that's a shark's tail.’ Then I saw the fish in its mouth and I knew it was going to go viral.”

Jon predicted correctly.

Photos courtesy of Doc Jon via Facebook

Jon’s photo, which has already been shared by thousands of people, features the osprey holding a shark, which is holding a fish—making it sort of like the photographic version of a turducken. News of Jon’s amazing photo spread after he posted it to his Facebook page and a local news station saw it. Since then, he told Fstoppers, he’s been receiving requests for interviews from as far away as Israel and India.

Of course, with all that exposure comes the inevitable question of authenticity. Fortunately, Jon is taking that part in stride.

"The fun part for me is some people are commenting that it's Photoshopped, and obviously, those people don't know the limitations of Photoshop," Jon told Fstoppers. "Then, other people are telling me I should have sold it instead of sharing it online. I'm laughing, because really, it's not a good photo. The photo itself kind of sucks. But it tells a great story and it's getting me a lot of recognition for my other work now."

[h/t: Fstoppers]

nextArticle.image_alt|e
Harry Trimble
Delightful Photo Series Celebrates Britain’s Municipal Trash Cans
Harry Trimble
Harry Trimble

Not all trash cans are alike. In the UK, few know this better than Harry Trimble, the brains behind #govbins, a photo project that aims to catalog all the trash can designs used by local governments across Britain.

Trimble, a 29-year-old designer based in South London, began the series in 2016, when he noticed the variation in trash can design across the cities he visited in the UK. While most bins are similar sizes and shapes, cities make trash cans their own with unique graphics and unusual colors. He started to photograph the cans he happened to see day-to-day, but the project soon morphed beyond that. Now, he tries to photograph at least one new bin a week.

A bright blue trash can reads ‘Knowsley Council: Recycle for Knowsley.’
Knowsley Village, England

“I got impatient,” Trimble says in an email to Mental Floss. “Now there’s increasingly more little detours and day trips” to track down new bin designs, he says, “which my friends, family and workmates patiently let me drag them on.” He has even pulled over on the road just to capture a new bin he spotted.

So far, he’s found cans that are blue, green, brown, black, gray, maroon, purple, and red. Some are only one color, while others feature lids of a different shade than the body of the can. Some look very modern, with minimalist logos and city website addresses, Trimble describes, “while others look all stately with coats of arms and crests of mythical creatures.”

A black trash can features an 'H' logo.
Hertsmere, England

A blue trash can reads ‘South Ribble Borough Council: Forward with South Ribble.’
South Ribble, England

A green trash can with a crest reads ‘Trafford Council: Food and Garden Waste Only.’
Trafford, Greater Manchester, England

Trimble began putting his images up online in 2017, and recently started an Instagram to show off his finds.

For now, he’s “more than managing” his one-can-a-week goal. See the whole series at govbins.uk.

All images by Harry Trimble

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER
More from mental floss studios