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Frequent Sighing Helps Keep You Alive

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Good news for hopeless romantics and the perpetually dismayed: All that sighing is good for you. In fact, you’d die without it. Scientists have now pinpointed the region in the brain that transforms normal breathing into a life-giving sigh. They published their findings this week in the journal Nature.  Let’s start with the mechanics. Physiologically speaking, sighing is a way of keeping your lungs inflated. “A sigh is a deep breath, but not a voluntary deep breath,” study co-author Jack Feldman said in a press release. “It starts out as a normal breath, but before you exhale, you take a second breath on top of it.” Whether you realize it or not, you do this about 12 times an hour, and even more than that when you’re stressed or anxious. And it’s a good thing you do. “If you don’t sigh every five minutes of so, the alveoli will slowly collapse, causing lung failure,” Feldman said. “That’s why patients in early iron lungs had such problems, because they never sighed.” The machines had not been programmed to give patients regular deep, lung-filling breaths. One group of researchers sifted through nearly 19,000 gene expression patterns in the active brains of mice, looking for the root of the sigh reflex. It was much smaller than they expected: just one little bundle of 200 cells in the brain stem, releasing one of two molecules called peptides. They shared their data with Feldman’s lab, and together the team found another set of 200 cells on the peptide receiving end.

A mouse's sigh clusters. Image credit: Stanford/Krasnow Lab

When the scientists prevented one peptide from reaching its goal, the rate of the mice’s sighing was cut in half. Blocking both peptides caused the mice to stop sighing altogether.  “Unlike a pacemaker that regulates only how fast we breathe, the brain’s breathing center also controls the type of breath we take,” co-author Mark Krasnow noted in the press release. “It’s made up of small numbers of different kinds of neurons. Each functions like a button that turns on a different type of breath. One button programs regular breaths, another sighs, and the others could be for yawns, sniffs, coughs, and maybe even laughs and cries.” It’s highly unusual for such small clusters of neurons to have so much power, Feldman said. “Sighing appears to be regulated by the fewest number of neurons we have seen linked to a fundamental human behavior.”  The team’s findings may someday lead to treatment for people with diseases that limit their breathing. “These molecular pathways are critical regulators of sighing, and define the core of a sigh-control circuit,” Krasnow said. “It may now be possible to find drugs that target these pathways to control sighing.” 

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Scientists Analyze the Moods of 90,000 Songs Based on Music and Lyrics
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Based on the first few seconds of a song, the part before the vocalist starts singing, you can judge whether the lyrics are more likely to detail a night of partying or a devastating breakup. The fact that musical structures can evoke certain emotions just as strongly as words can isn't a secret. But scientists now have a better idea of which language gets paired with which chords, according to their paper published in Royal Society Open Science.

For their study, researchers from Indiana University downloaded 90,000 songs from Ultimate Guitar, a site that allows users to upload the lyrics and chords from popular songs for musicians to reference. Next, they pulled data from labMT, which crowd-sources the emotional valence (positive and negative connotations) of words. They referred to the music recognition site Gracenote to determine where and when each song was produced.

Their new method for analyzing the relationship between music and lyrics confirmed long-held knowledge: that minor chords are associated with sad feelings and major chords with happy ones. Words with a negative valence, like "pain," "die," and "lost," are all more likely to fall on the minor side of the spectrum.

But outside of major chords, the researchers found that high-valence words tend to show up in a surprising place: seventh chords. These chords contain four notes at a time and can be played in both the major and minor keys. The lyrics associated with these chords are positive all around, but their mood varies slightly depending on the type of seventh. Dominant seventh chords, for example, are often paired with terms of endearment, like "baby", or "sweet." With minor seventh chords, the words "life" and "god" are overrepresented.

Using their data, the researchers also looked at how lyric and chord valence differs between genres, regions, and eras. Sixties rock ranks highest in terms of positivity while punk and metal occupy the bottom slots. As for geography, Scandinavia (think Norwegian death metal) produces the dreariest music while songs from Asia (like K-Pop) are the happiest. So if you're looking for a song to boost your mood, we suggest digging up some Asian rock music from the 1960s, and make sure it's heavy on the seventh chords.

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Space
Watch NASA Test Its New Supersonic Parachute at 1300 Miles Per Hour
NASA/JPL, YouTube
NASA/JPL, YouTube

NASA’s latest Mars rover is headed for the Red Planet in 2020, and the space agency is working hard to make sure its $2.1 billion project will land safely. When the Mars 2020 rover enters the Martian atmosphere, it’ll be assisted by a brand-new, advanced parachute system that’s a joy to watch in action, as a new video of its first test flight shows.

Spotted by Gizmodo, the video was taken in early October at NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia. Narrated by the technical lead from the test flight, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory’s Ian Clark, the two-and-a-half-minute video shows the 30-mile-high launch of a rocket carrying the new, supersonic parachute.

The 100-pound, Kevlar-based parachute unfurls at almost 100 miles an hour, and when it is entirely deployed, it’s moving at almost 1300 miles an hour—1.8 times the speed of sound. To be able to slow the spacecraft down as it enters the Martian atmosphere, the parachute generates almost 35,000 pounds of drag force.

For those of us watching at home, the video is just eye candy. But NASA researchers use it to monitor how the fabric moves, how the parachute unfurls and inflates, and how uniform the motion is, checking to see that everything is in order. The test flight ends with the payload crashing into the ocean, but it won’t be the last time the parachute takes flight in the coming months. More test flights are scheduled to ensure that everything is ready for liftoff in 2020.

[h/t Gizmodo]

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