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ubersnap
ubersnap

Ubersnap Lets You Print Out Animated GIFs

ubersnap
ubersnap

Ubersnap, the animated spin on Instagram, delivers GIFs you can make and share in a snap. Best of all, after making your creation, you can have it printed as a moving hologram (which are still super cool, by the way).

The Singapore-based app allows users to take several pictures, which are then woven together to create a GIF. After that, users can apply filters and the finished product is placed on their followers' feeds. Ubersnap customers who are feeling extra-proud of their creations can order prints that will be delivered right to their home. As the company describes it, the animated prints come to life as they are tilted up and down, similarly to the way photographs work in the wizard world of Harry Potter.

"There's something special about holding a photo print in your hands and we wanted to capture that experience for GIFs," Ubersnap founder Boon Chin told us in an e-mail. "I think it's especially timely, given that GIFs have become such a popular form of communication."

You can download the app right here for iOS. Use the code "mentalfloss" on your first print and you can get $5 off on us.

[h/t PetaPixel]

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David Nadlinger
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science
This Photo of a Single Atom Won a Science Photography Top Prize
David Nadlinger
David Nadlinger

While you've been busy finding just the right Instagram filter for your cat, a University of Oxford graduate student has been occupied with visualizing a single atom and capturing it in a still frame. And the remarkable feat recently earned an Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council photography award. Why? It was taken with a conventional camera, and the atom can be seen with the naked eye.

Take a look:

A close-up of a single atom in an ion trap
David Nadlinger

That tiny dot in between the two parallel metal electrodes is a strontium atom suspended by electric fields in an ion trap. It’s visible because the photographer, Ph.D. candidate David Nadlinger, projected blue violet light into a vacuum chamber. The atom absorbed and reflected the light, allowing Nadlinger to snap a photo in the split instant the atom was viewable. The space between the two points is just 0.08 of an inch.

Nadlinger dubbed the image "Single Atom in an Ion Trap" and took the Council’s top award. In a statement, he expressed enthusiasm that other people are now able to see what his work in quantum computing looks like.

[h/t Newsweek]

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iStock
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Animals
London Photographer Captures the Dogs of the World in Their Own Habitats
iStock
iStock

When snapping pictures, some travel photographers prefer to focus on people walking the streets. Highlighting the local residents can help ground a place in reality, but humans aren’t the only subjects worth capturing. For his project "Dogs, Dogs, Dogs", London-based photographer Alan Schaller documents the canines that he finds in all corners of the globe.

According to My Modern Met, Schaller started out photographing people he met on his travels. The high-contrast, black-and-white look of his work has earned him widespread recognition. For his latest project, he has chosen to showcase dogs in the same style.

Schaller described dogs to My Modern Met as “consistently friendly, unpredictable, and amusing” compared to humans. When he sees a dog he wants to photograph, he will first ask the owner's permission, then bend down to the pet’s level to gain its trust. He has photographed dogs in Norway, England, India, Thailand, Turkey, and plenty of places in between, and the personalities of the dogs he captures are just as diverse as their homes. You can check out his photography below and follow Schaller on Instagram to see more of his work.

[h/t My Modern Met]

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