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Titanic II Replica Ship to Set Sail in 2018

It’s been nearly 104 years since the RMS Titanic struck an iceberg in the Atlantic, meeting a tragic end on its maiden voyage and claiming more than 1500 lives. The story has since captivated the world, helped along by a little film adaptation in 1997 starring Leonardo DiCaprio and Kate Winslet.

Among those who remain fascinated by the tale is Australian billionaire Clive Palmer, who is building a replica of the ill-fated ship called Titanic II. It was recently announced that the ship will set sail in 2018, two years later than planned.

Blue Star Line’s recreation will look just like the original liner, but will be four meters wider to meet 21st century maritime safety regulations, and will feature a hull that is welded instead of riveted. It will also meet modern safety regulations, including equipment like life jackets, a certain quota of lifeboats, and of course, updated technology.

"The new Titanic will of course have modern evacuation procedures, satellite controls, digital navigation and radar systems and all those things you'd expect on a 21st century ship," James McDonald, the global marketing director of Palmer's Blue Star Line, told the Belfast Telegraph.

The ship will be 270 meters long, 53 meters high, and weigh 40,000 tons. It will contain nine floors, with 840 cabins to accommodate 2400 passengers and 900 crew members. Travelers can visit Turkish baths, a swimming pool, gyms, and spaces modeled after the original restaurants and dining rooms. The replica will also stay loyal to history with its ticket classifications: first-, second-, and third-class tickets will be offered.

Titanic II will, however, differ from history in its route, traveling from Jiangsu, China, to Dubai in the United Arab Emirates, where Blue Star Line has reportedly been fostering business partnerships.

If the idea of the replica rubs you the wrong way, you’re not alone. Relatives of some of the Titanic’s lost passengers have spoken out against the project. On the flip side, Blue Star Line has reportedly received a bevy of inquiries from interested parties, and offers as high as £640,000 (about $925,600) for a ticket. We'll assume that gets you a first class ride.

Explore more designs for the future vessel here and hear more about the project here.

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Design
This Font Changes Shape As You Type
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Holy

Writing with the Futuracha Pro font isn’t just about creating a finished product. Each letter reacts to what you type by lengthening and curling around its neighboring characters, making the act of writing itself an interactive experience.

According to The Huffington Post, Futuracha Pro is the brainchild of graphic designer Odysseas Galinos Paparounis of the Greek branding agency høly. As a design student, he was inspired for the idea of a changing typeface while observing the movements of Caribbean cockroaches for an illustration class. The insects' sweeping antennae and prickly feet inspired him to superimpose these elements onto his favorite font: Futura.

Font changes shape as you type.
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The name Futuracha, which combines the words Futura and cucaracha ("cockroach" in Spanish), is a nod to the project’s quirky origins. After sharing his concept with fellow graphic designers, Paparounis sought to make a version of the font that’s accessible to everyone on an open source basis. He launched an effort to crowdfund Futuracha Pro on Indiegogo earlier this year and closed the campaign after raising $86,431. You can download the font for your computer from the høly website with prices starting around $29.

[h/t The Huffington Post]

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Design
Watch an Artist Build a Secret Studio Beneath an Overpass
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Lebrel

Artists can be very particular about the spaces where they choose to do their work. Furniture designer Fernando Abellanas’s desk may not boast the quietest or most convenient location on Earth, but it definitely wins points for seclusion. According to Co.Design, the artist covertly constructed his studio beneath a bridge in Valencia, Spain.

To make his vision a reality, Abellanas had to build a metal and plywood apparatus and attach it to the top of an underpass. After climbing inside, he uses a crank to wheel the box to the top of the opposite wall. There, the contents of his studio, including his desk, chair, and wall art, are waiting for him.

The art nook was installed without permission from the city, so Abellanas admits that it’s only a matter of time before the authorities dismantle it or it's raided by someone else. While this space may not be permanent, he plans to build others like it around the city in secret. You can get a look at his construction process in the video below.

[h/t Co.Design]

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