The Dead Sea is one of the most intriguing and interesting lakes in the world. Located at the lowest point on Earth, tourists from around the globe flock to this hypersaline phenomenon, which borders Jordan to the east and Israel and the West Bank to the west. Dive into these nine fascinating facts about the "Salt Sea."

1. IT WAS FORMED FROM A RIFT IN THE EARTH'S CRUST.

The Dead Sea came to be because the crust was stretched thanks to a rift being formed. Known as a rift valley, the surface sunk down where the crust was particularly thin. Scientists estimate the Dead Sea may be sinking more each year, so book your tickets ASAP.

2. IT’S LOCATED AT THE LOWEST POINT ON EARTH.

The surface of the Dead Sea is over 1300 feet below sea level, making it the lowest point on Earth's surface. In the deepest part, it’s more than 2300 feet below sea level. It’s located on the edge of the Judean Desert, a very hot region at the foot of the Ha-He'etekim cliff. It’s close to Jerusalem, and the connecting point between the desert and developed land in the Middle East.

3. IT MAY HAVE INCREDIBLE HEALING POWERS.

When doctors prescribe a visit to the Dead Sea for their patients as a source of healing, you know something special is going on. With up to 32 percent salt and extremely high mineral content, the water is said to help people with respiratory issues, joint problems like arthritis, and many chronic skin conditions such as psoriasis, acne, and cellulite. As you go farther into the water, this land-locked lake becomes saltier. The low UV rays from the sun and bromide in the air also contribute to natural healing.

4. IT’S ONE OF THE WORLD'S SALTIEST BODIES OF WATER.

Pete, on 14 May 2005, CC BY-SA 3.0

No need for flotation devices. Our bodies are more buoyant in the Dead Sea because of the high concentration of mineral salts that have dissolved. The Dead Sea is eight times saltier than the oceans and has the highest concentration of salt of any body of water in the world—so rather than swim, visitors literally float around. In fact, don’t even try to swim; it won't work.

5. IT’S BEEN A PLACE OF REFUGE SINCE BIBLICAL TIMES.

The Dead Sea is cited in the Hebrew Bible during the rule of King David as a place where he sought refuge. This famous sea is also mentioned in other biblical books throughout history. The first tourist to visit the Dead Sea was most likely Abraham. (Unfortunately there are no photos of Abraham slathering black mud on his skin or floating in the Dead Sea reading the newspaper to back this up.)

6. NO PLANTS OR ANIMALS CAN LIVE IN THE WATER.

No creatures can survive in the Dead Sea, which means no jumping dolphins, no swimming fish, and no seaweed to get stuck between your toes. The massive levels of salt prevent the existence of all life forms, except some bacteria discovered in recent years. Needless to say, don’t drink the water!

7. DEAD SEA MUD IS GREAT FOR YOUR SKIN.

HAZEM BADER/AFP/Getty Images

Almost as famous as the sea itself are the images of tourists slathering mud on their bodies, letting it harden, and then rinsing it off in the sea (as much as you can rinse off dried mud with salt water). The deposits of black mud come directly from the seabed. The mud is beneficial to your skin as it is high in magnesium, sodium, potassium, and calcium. Looking to purchase this world-famous mud in North America? No problem. Dead Sea mud and minerals are available online through AHAVA.

8. IT’S THE BIGGEST FREE SPA ON EARTH.

With all that healing mud, the Dead Sea is quite literally the biggest natural free spa on earth. But should you feel the need to indulge in further spa treatments, there are multiple hotels to choose from in the area that offer rejuvenating spa services, including the famous Ein Gedi Hotel.

9. YES, THE DEAD SEA SCROLLS WERE FOUND HERE.

The Dead Sea Scrolls were found hidden in a cave in Qumran and contain some of the oldest copies ever discovered of the Hebrew Bible. They have been called the greatest archaeological find of the 20th century. Portions of the Dead Sea Scrolls now make the occasional tour at various museums so we can learn about their significant history.