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Monikers is a Beautiful—and Fun—Party Game

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Monikers is a new spin on an old classic. The game, created by Alex Hague, updates Celebrity, a more than 100-year-old game that involves writing down the names of celebrities (fictional and animal celebrities included) and putting them in a hat. The goal is simple: in one minute, get your teammates to guess who you picked from the pile.

In 2014, Hague started a Kickstarter campaign to produce his version of the game and successfully raised more than $56,000. Almost two years later, you can buy it on Amazon or download the free PDF version right here.

While Monikers's rules are similar to the original game's, they feature a few upgrades. After all the cards have been guessed in the first round, players move on to round two. In this round, the cards are the same, but the card picker can only use one word as a clue (since the teams already know the topics, a good memory will come in handy). In the third round, the players have to use gestures, like in charades.

Each set comes with 500 beautiful cards as well as 50 blank ones to fill yourself, meaning you can add personal celebrities, like the friendly gas station attendant or the guy on campus who wears two pairs of sunglasses. Each of those pre-set cards comes with a helpful description or beautiful illustration from creative artists like Zach Weinersmith, Jana Kinsman, and Ariel Aberg-Riger. The cards are also sorted by difficulty, ranging from one to four. The harder the topic, the more points the team gets.

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Mattel Unveils New Uno Edition for Colorblind Players
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Mattel

On the heels of International Colorblind Awareness Day, Mattel, which owns Uno, announced it would be unveiling a colorblind-friendly edition of the 46-year-old card game.

The updated deck is a collaboration with ColorADD, a global organization for colorblind accessibility and education. In place of its original color-dependent design, this new Uno will feature a small symbol next to each card's number that corresponds with its intended primary color.

As The Verge points out, Mattel is not actually the first to invent a card game for those with colorblindness. But this inclusive move is still pivotal: According to Fast Co. Design, Uno is currently the most popular noncollectible card game in the world. And with access being extended to the 350 million people globally and 13 million Americans who are colorblind, the game's popularity is sure to grow.

Mattel unveils color-friendly Uno deck
Mattel

[h/t: The Verge

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fun
Lightning-Fast Teen Sets New Rubik’s Cube World Record
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In less time than it takes some people to open a pickle jar, 15-year-old Patrick Ponce can solve a Rubik’s Cube. His total time of 4.69 seconds makes him the new holder of the world record for fastest 3-by-3 Rubik’s Cube completion, as highlighted by Compete (and seen in the video below).

Ponce achieved the impressive feat of dexterity at a tournament in Middletown, Virginia, on September 2. He takes the title from the previous Rubik’s Cube speed record holder, Feliks Zemdegs, who solved the puzzle in 4.73 seconds at a competition in Australia in December 2016.

But the teenager may not hold his new position at the top for very long: Expert Rubik's Cubers have been steadily lowering the speed record beneath the 5-second mark since 2015. And human competitors still have a long way to go before solving a cube in 0.887 seconds—that’s the record that was set by a robot in March of 2017.

[h/t Compete]

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