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Experience a Salvador Dalí Painting in Virtual Reality

If you’ve ever wanted to explore a Salvador Dalí painting in all its trippy, dream-like glory, a new virtual reality installation at The Dalí Museum in St. Petersburg, Florida allows you to do just that—all while fully awake.

The experience is part of "Disney and Dalí: Architects of the Imagination" in which visitors can learn about the Spanish surrealist's relationship with Walt Disney. In 1945, the two partnered to create an animated short called Destino. The duo didn’t finish the project themselves, thought it was eventually completed and released by The Walt Disney Company in 2003. However, Dalí and Disney became lifelong friends—a bond that the museum explores through paintings, story sketches, letters, photos, and other objects.

While Dalí and Disney’s collaborative genius is the stuff of legend, the exhibition’s true highlight is the interactive recreation of one of Dalí's most famous paintings. Visitors are invited to don Oculus Rift headsets, which transport them into the wild and wondrous world of Archaeological Reminiscence of Millet’s “Angelus.” They can walk around the painting’s vast desert landscape, stare up at the towering stone figures of a praying man and woman, and catch a glimpse of two tiny background figures that are meant to represent Dalí and his father. Meanwhile, motifs from other Dalí works—gigantic elephants, birds, the “Lobster Telephone,” and more—lurk on the edges of the horizon.

The exhibition runs until June 12, 2016. Check out a sneak peek of the immersive art experience above, or visit The Dalí Museum’s website for more information.

All images via YouTube.

[h/t Smithsonian]

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The Getty Center, Surrounded By Wildfires, Will Leave Its Art Where It Is
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The wildfires sweeping through California have left countless homeowners and businesses scrambling as the blazes continue to grow out of control in various locations throughout the state. While art lovers worried when they heard that Los Angeles's Getty Center would be closing its doors this week, as the fires closed part of the 405 Freeway, there was a bit of good news. According to museum officials, the priceless works housed inside the famed Getty Center are said to be perfectly secure and won't need to be evacuated from the facility.

“The safest place for the art is right here at the Getty,” Ron Hartwig, the Getty’s vice president of communications, told the Los Angeles Times. According to its website, the museum was closed on December 5 and December 6 “to protect the collections from smoke from fires in the region,” but as of now, the art inside is staying put.

Though every museum has its own way of protecting the priceless works inside it, the Los Angeles Times notes that the Getty Center was constructed in such a way as to protect its contents from the very kind of emergency it's currently facing. The air throughout the gallery is filtered by a system that forces it out, rather than a filtration method which would bring air in. This system will keep the smoke and air pollutants from getting into the facility, and by closing the museum this week, the Getty is preventing the harmful air from entering the building through any open doors.

There is also a water tank at the facility that holds 1 million gallons in reserve for just such an occasion, and any brush on the property is routinely cleared away to prevent the likelihood of a fire spreading. The Getty Villa, a separate campus located in the Pacific Palisades off the Pacific Coast Highway, was also closed out of concern for air quality this week.

The museum is currently working with the police and fire departments in the area to determine the need for future closures and the evacuation of any personnel. So far, the fires have claimed more than 83,000 acres of land, leading to the evacuation of thousands of people and the temporary closure of I-405, which runs right alongside the Getty near Los Angeles’s Bel-Air neighborhood.

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This 77-Year-Old Artist Saves Money on Art Supplies by 'Painting' in Microsoft Excel
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It takes a lot of creativity to turn a blank canvas into an inspired work of art. Japanese artist Tatsuo Horiuchi makes his pictures out of something that’s even more dull than a white page: an empty spreadsheet in Microsoft Excel.

When he retired, the 77-year-old Horiuchi, whose work was recently spotlighted by Great Big Story, decided he wanted to get into art. At the time, he was hesitant to spend money on painting supplies or even computer software, though, so he began experimenting with one of the programs that was already at his disposal.

Horiuchi's unique “painting” method shows that in the right hands, Excel’s graph-building features can be used to bring colorful landscapes to life. The tranquil ponds, dense forests, and blossoming flowers in his art are made by drawing shapes with the software's line tool, then adding shading with the bucket tool.

Since picking up the hobby in the 2000s, Horiuchi has been awarded multiple prizes for his creative work with Excel. Let that be inspiration for Microsoft loyalists who are still broken up about the death of Paint.

You can get a behind-the-scenes look at the artist's process in the video below.

[h/t Great Big Story]

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