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7 Scientifically Proven Ways to Get Noticed on LinkedIn

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There’s an art to writing a winning LinkedIn profile, sure, but there’s also a science. The professional networking site has tracked and analyzed exactly what it takes for a profile to get seen far and wide and to land near the top of a recruiter’s search results. First step: “Leave modesty at the door!” says LinkedIn’s Catherine Fisher, who helps people create and leverage better profiles.

So whether you’re hot and heavy for a new job ASAP or just open to the idea of getting wooed by recruiters, shrug off your modesty and read these tips.

1. DITCH THE SELFIE STICK.

Profiles with a photo receive 14 times more views than profiles with no photo at all; so if you haven’t uploaded a photo yet, cut the excuses and do it. “If you can afford a professional headshot, that’s something to aim for. But if not, it’s OK to use your smartphone,” says Donna Serdula, author of LinkedIn Makeover: Professional Secrets to a Powerful LinkedIn Profile.

Just make sure to snap the pic in a well-lit room (that’s especially important for smartphone photos), and to wear a shirt that makes you look polished. “And I would absolutely caution against a selfie,” says Serdula. “You want to come across as professional and trustworthy, not like someone who doesn’t take the profile seriously.”

2. WRITE A SUMMARY.

We know, we know. Writing a summary about yourself sucks. But if you can wring out 40 words or more, your profile will get viewed seven times more than the chump who skipped this profile section entirely, according to LinkedIn’s data. As tempting as it might be to copy and paste some portion of your resume to fill this field, resist, urges Serdula. “This is your space to make a digital first impression. What do you love about your field? What are some of the successes you’ve had, what gives you real satisfaction from the industry? If you share your story, you won’t come across as a desperate job seeker, but someone who’s worth reaching out to.” 

3. BRAG ABOUT YOUR SKILLS.

Members who list skills on their profiles receive 13 times more profile views on average than those who don’t, according to LinkedIn. “You’ve worked hard to build your Rolodex of skills—here is your chance to show them off, with as much detail as possible,” says Fisher. Don’t limit your bragging to computer languages and software programs, either. When the National Association of Colleges and Employers surveyed hiring managers about the skills they planned to prioritize when recruiting, soft skills—like the ability to work in a team or give a killer presentation—topped the list.

4. DIG INTO THE PAST.

Here’s reason enough to sweat the chronology and list all of your past positions: Your profile is 12 times more likely to be viewed if you have more than one job listed, LinkedIn found. While you’re getting all nostalgic, be sure to fill out any credentials you’ve earned, organizations you’ve joined, or languages you’ve learned. Recruiters will hunt for candidates using keywords in these fields, so leaving them blank could mean you get overlooked. 

5. ASK FOR RECOMMENDATIONS.

Strong recommendations can help improve your ranking in LinkedIn’s people search results, but recruiters won’t stop at just reading those glowing reviews, says Serdula. “Hiring managers and recruiters will typically click through to see who is writing the recommendation—a manager or senior-level executive will carry more weight than a coworker.”

She suggests getting recs from wow-worthy names by asking for the recommendation through LinkedIn (sending a separate email adds more work for the recommender) and drafting a short recommendation on their behalf. “Most people don’t have the time or the interest in writing, so they’ll be relieved that you’ve done it for them,” she says. Feel weird about ghost writing your own glowing praise? Skip the over-the-top adjectives and stick to objective accomplishments.

6. WEAR YOUR HEART ON YOUR DIGITAL SLEEVE.

Listing volunteer experiences and causes can score you six times more views than if you left them off your profile. And that info won’t just bring more eyeballs to your profile—it can improve how recruiters evaluate you. “Almost half of all hiring managers say they view volunteer experiences as equivalent to traditional work experiences,” says Fisher. “Those charity run-walks, blood donations, and other causes that you’re passionate about can really paint a more complete picture of not just the kind of person you are, but the kind of employee and colleague you’d be.”

7. COMMIT TO POSTING ONCE A WEEK.

“If you really want to stand out from the crowd, write and share content,” says Fisher. “Those who share at least once a week are nearly 10 times more likely to be contacted by a recruiter than those who don’t.”

That’s because when you write a post, it’s viewed far and wide: On average, six times more people outside your network will see it, with about 45 percent of readers being high enough in their industries (c-suite, managers, etc.) to make a hiring decision.

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job secrets
11 Behind-the-Counter Secrets of Baristas
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Being a barista is no easy task, and it’s not just the early hours and the don’t-talk-to-me-unless-I’ve-had-my-coffee customers. While people often think working at a cafe is a part-time, temporary gig, it takes extensive training to learn your way around an espresso machine, and most baristas are in it for the love of coffee, not just to pay the bills. Mental Floss spoke to a few baristas working at the New York Coffee Festival to learn what exactly goes on behind the counter, and why you should never, ever dump your extra coffee in the trash.

1. THEY REALLY LOVE COFFEE.

One of the biggest misconceptions about the profession, says New York City-based barista Kayla Bird, is “that it's not a real job.” But especially in specialty cafes, many baristas are in it for the long haul. Coffee is their career.

“It's a chosen field,” as barista Virgil San Miguel puts it. “It's not like you work in a coffee shop because it's a glamorous job,” he explains. “It's more like a passion.”

2. THEY GO THROUGH A LOT OF TRAINING.

“Being a really good barista takes a lot of studying,” explains Jake Griffin, a wholesale representative for Irving Farm Coffee Roasters who has worked in the coffee industry for almost a decade. “It can take a few years. You have to start to understand origins, production methods, where your coffee came from.” You have to go through an intensive education before you start pulling espresso shots for customers, so it's possible that the person taking your order and fetching your pastry isn't even allowed to make you a drink yet. “They have to be what we call 'bar certified' before they're even allowed on the machine,” he says. “Usually people start off in our cafes in various support roles, then start to go to classes and go through the training program.”

3. THEY’RE PROBABLY PRETTY WIRED.

Sure, baristas take full advantage of all that free coffee. And if they work in their company’s training programs, their whole job is to drink coffee. But it has its downsides. “I taste—at minimum—ten shots of espresso a day,” John Hrabe, who trains baristas at Birch Coffee in New York City, says. On his busier days, it might be as many as 20. You get used to all the caffeine, he claims—at least until you take a few days off. “Then when you go on vacation and you're not working ... everyone's like, 'Why's John so tired?’”

Other baristas who have worked in the field for a long time say the same. “I’ve been doing this for 15 years, and I used to have five or six coffees a day,” Michael Sadler, who helped develop the barista education program at Toby’s Coffee, says. “Now I do two,” he says, both because of the caffeine-induced anxiety and the withdrawal headaches he would get on his days off.

4. OR THEY’RE DRINKING … SOMETHING ELSE.

Like any job, there are things that go on in coffee shops that the boss would definitely not approve of. According to one barista who has worked at both a corporate coffee chain and specialty cafes in Delaware and New York, coffee shops can get pretty rowdy behind-the-scenes. “If you see a barista with a lidded cup behind the bar, there's probably a 50/50 chance: It's either coffee or beer,” he says. “You never know.” And it’s not just the booze, either. “I’ve been a part of secret menus that have cannabis-infused coconut milk,” he explains. “I had a pretty good cappuccino.”

5. THEY GET ANNOYED WHEN YOU SKIP THE PLEASANTRIES.

You don’t want to hold up the line telling a barista your life story at 7 a.m., but even if you’re in a hurry, don’t forget to say hi before you jump into demanding that large coffee. “Walking up to somebody and saying 'Almond latte,' when they just said 'How are you today?' is probably the biggest thing you can do to get on a barista's bad side,” Toby's Coffee's Sadler says. “It's like, exchange pleasantries, then get to business.”

6. IF YOU’RE NOT NICE TO THEM, THEY WON’T BE NICE TO YOU.

Not everyone is super perky in the morning, but if you can’t be civil, you’re better off making your own coffee at home. At some places, if you get snippy with the employees, you’re going to get worse than furtive eye rolls between baristas (though you’ll get that, too).

“Be nice to your baristas, or you get decaf,” warns one barista. While it varies from cafe to cafe, multiple baristas told Mental Floss that it happens. Rude customers might get three letters written on their cup: “They call it DTB—‘decaf that bitch.’”

There’s a less potent way a barista can get back at you, too. If the hole in your coffee lid lines up with the seam of your paper cup, you’re going to get dripped on. And sometimes, it’s not an accident. “When a barista puts the mouth on the seam, they want it to leak on you,” a New York City-based barista explains.

Others are a little more forgiving of rude patrons. “I like making them the best drink that they've ever had, just to kill them with kindness,” one coffee shop employee says. “I don't want them to be like, ‘She’s a bad barista.’” Just to be safe, though, it's better to be nice.

7. THEY PROBABLY KNOW WHAT YOU WANT BEFORE YOU DO.

“The longer you work in coffee, the more when someone walks in the door you read their personality type and say, I know exactly what you're going to drink,” Jared Hamilton, a self-described “espresso wizard” at the Brooklyn-based chain Cafe Grumpy, says. When I ask him to predict my drink, he proves his skills. “What you're going to drink is like, an alternative milk, flat white or cappuccino. So maybe soy, probably almond. Nonstandard. You don't want a lot of milk, just enough.” He’s not too far off—my go-to is, in fact, a non-standard, some-milk-but-not-too-much drink, a decaf cappuccino, though I drink regular milk in it. He points to another festival visitor who is dressed in business attire. "That guy right there, he drinks espresso all day," he guesses.

Depending on the coffee shop, the barista might know what customers want more than they do. Dominique Richards, who started her first barista job in Brooklyn three months ago, says she has to order for her customers around a third of the time. “Usually if someone's looking at the menu for more than 30 seconds, I jump in and say, ‘Hey, what would you like?’” She then asks them a few questions, like whether they want hot or cold coffee, and goes from there, often recommending lattes for people who are just getting into specialty coffee. “It's kind of a learning experience for the majority” of her customers, she says.

8. CUSTOMERS CAN BE REALLY PARTICULAR.

“People treat cafes like they're [their own] kitchen,” according to Cafe Grumpy’s Hamilton. “My favorite thing people do is when they walk in and they rearrange the condiment bar. Then they order, then they go use the condiments.” Apparently, some people are really particular about the location of their sugar packets. And if you throw off their routine, watch out. One of his colleagues describes a customer who threw a fit because the shop didn’t have a cinnamon shaker, demanding a refund for both her coffee and her pastry. (They eventually found some cinnamon for her.)

9. YOU SHOULD NEVER, EVER DUMP EXTRA COFFEE STRAIGHT INTO THE TRASH.

Even if you ask for room for milk in your drip coffee, the cup is still sometimes just a bit too full. It’s tempting to just pour a little into the trash can, but whoever has to take out that garbage is going to pay for it. “Please don't pour it in the garbage,” Bluestone Lane barista Marina Velazquez pleads. “Because at the end of the night, it ends up on our feet.” If the shop doesn’t have a dedicated container for you to pour out your excess coffee, take it back to the counter and ask them to dump a bit in the sink. Your baristas will thank you.

10. MAKING ESPRESSO DRINKS ISN’T A ROTE SKILL.

When you’re waiting in line, it may look like baristas are doing the same thing over and over for dozens of drinks. But in fact, every order presents its own challenges.

“There's probably not an appreciation for how much a coffee can vary,” explains Katie Duris, a former barista of 10 years who now works as a wholesale manager at Joe Coffee. High-quality coffee is “really dynamic as an ingredient,” she says. Baristas “have to make micro adjustments all day long. You have to change the grind based on the humidity in the room or a draft or how much coffee is in your hopper—if it's an espresso machine—so they're tweaking all day long … good baristas are making adjustments all the time.”

11. IT’S PHYSICALLY TAXING.

Making espresso drinks all day long can wear you out, and not just because you’re on your feet all day. There are also repetitive stress injuries to consider. “There's physical wear and tear on your joints when you're a barista,” Birch's Hrabe says. He’s worked in coffee for 11 years, and says that tamping espresso shots (compressing the grounds before brewing) day after day has given him tennis elbow. “It's totally common for baristas,” he says.

In short, baristas are probably doing more work behind the bar than you give them credit for, whether it’s dealing with customers or actually making coffee. “Being a barista is fun, but it's hard work,” Bluestone Lane's Velazquez says. “Everybody should be a barista at least once. I think it teaches humility.”

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Art
See How Careful Restoration Can Illuminate a 17th-Century Painting
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Many of the most famous oil paintings ever committed to canvas, like Leonardo da Vinci’s Mona Lisa and Rembrandt van Rijn's The Night Watch, aren't just made of paint, but include a top layer of protective varnish, too. This clear coating preserves the paint beneath it for centuries, but it also decays and darkens over time, causing scenes to look vastly different than what the artist intended. To demonstrate how much aged varnish can affect a painting, art dealer Philip Mould (co-creator of the BBC One show Fake Or Fortune?) recently gave his Twitter followers a step-by-step look at the restoration process.

As Mashable reports, the varnish on the 17th-century painting in the clips and photos below is 200 years old. Painted in 1618, the image depicts an anonymous Jacobean-era woman who posed for the portrait when she was 36.

As the varnish is stripped away from the piece with a paintbrush and solvent, you can see the soft, rosy colors the artist originally chose start to come through. The process reveals colors and details that would have been lost as long as the yellowed protective layer remained.

For a closer look at how professionals can salvage paintings from the destructive forces of time, check out these behind-the-scenes secrets of art restorers.

[h/t Mashable]

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