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10 Sweet Facts About Cinnamon Toast Crunch

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Cinnamon Toast Crunch has been serving up crunchy little squares of deliciousness since 1984. Besides cinnamon and sugar, the cereal is made with wheat and rice to mimic the taste of cinnamon toast. Read on for 10 sweet things you might not know about Cinnamon Toast Crunch.

1. EVERYONE LOVED CHEF WENDELL.

Every good cereal needs a mascot, and Cinnamon Toast Crunch is no different. Chef Wendell is the rotund little baker who first appeared on the cereal’s boxes and TV commercials in 1987. Wearing glasses, a white baker’s hat, and an apron, Chef Wendell is a jolly old man who sang while he baked, and was sometimes seen with two other (younger, and more slender) bakers.

2. RUMOR HAS IT THAT WENDELL WAS RESPONSIBLE FOR THE DISAPPEARANCE OF THE OTHER TWO BAKERS.

In 1991, Wendell’s two coworkers in the bakery (named Bob and Quello) disappeared from all Cinnamon Toast Crunch commercials and cereal boxes. Fans jokingly speculated that Wendell was jealous of his coworkers’ youth and buffer bodies, so he drowned them in a cinnamon swirl river. In reality, General Mills stated that consumer feedback led them to remove the other two bakers and feature Chef Wendell more prominently.

3. IN 2009, GENERAL MILLS FIRED WENDELL AND INTRODUCED THE CRAZY SQUARES.

Since 2009, Cinnamon Toast Crunch boxes haven’t shown Chef Wendell’s image. Instead, General Mills has moved on to a different mascot, the Crazy Squares, who made their television debut in 2010. The Crazy Squares are anthropomorphic pieces of cereal with cinnamon swirls on them.

4. THE CEREAL HAS SPAWNED SO MANY OTHER VARIETIES.

To capitalize on the popularity of Cinnamon Toast Crunch, General Mills introduced French Toast Crunch in 1995, offering little squares flavored like French toast rather than cinnamon toast. Peanut Butter Toast Crunch cereal, introduced in 2004, was a nutty variant of Cinnamon Toast Crunch, while Frosted Toast Crunch and Chocolate Toast Crunch had a sugary vanilla and chocolate coating, respectively. General Mills also created Sugar Cookie Toast Crunch to replicate the taste of Christmas cookies … for breakfast.

5. FRENCH TOAST CRUNCH WAS THE MOST POPULAR SPINOFF.

In 2006, General Mills removed French Toast Crunch from supermarket shelves due to low sales, but after years of tweets and fan mail, General Mills revealed that French Toast Crunch would be coming back to the American market in 2015. (The Canadian version had been available north of the border the whole time.) Thanks to the passion and perseverance of fans, French Toast Crunch is proof that sometimes Facebook petitions actually work.

6. MONOPOLY ONCE GOT IN ON THE CINNAMON TOAST CRUNCH ACTION.

Or, at least, they probably did. In 2003, General Mills partnered with the board game Monopoly to release a limited edition Monopoly cereal. The cereal consisted of cereal squares that looked suspiciously like Cinnamon Toast Crunch mixed with colored, Lucky Charms-esque marshmallows modeled after Monopoly cards and hotels. Nice idea, but playing with your food when it's soaked in milk is difficult.

7. NOT ONLY CAN YOU EAT CINNAMON TOAST CRUNCH, YOU CAN VAPE IT.

Cinnamon Toast Crunch is such a popular flavor that you can even smoke it. E-cigarette users can inexplicably purchase a few different Cinnamon Toast Crunch flavors, so now you can have your cereal and vape it too.

8. NEVER FEAR, YOU CAN PROBABLY FIND CINNAMON TOAST CRUNCH ABROAD.

In Montreal and other parts of Quebec, Cinnamon Toast Crunch is called Croque-Cannelle, while in the UK and Ireland it now goes by Curiously Cinnamon (which also has a strawberry-flavored variant called Curiously Strawberry). In Poland, Cinnamon Toast Crunch is called Cini Minis, and it features the same images of the Crazy Squares in advertising.

9. SELFIE-SPOONS EXIST THANKS TO CINNAMON TOAST CRUNCH.

In 2015, General Mills announced that it was giving away free Cinnamon Toast Crunch selfie spoons, a.k.a. two-and-a-half-foot selfie sticks with spoons attached to them. This marketing campaign gave 1000 selfie spoons to Cinnamon Toast Crunch/selfie lovers, who only had to pay for shipping and handling. As the tagline for the selfie spoon said, “If you don’t post it on social media, did it really happen?” Truly the question of our time.

10. SLOGANS HAVE CHANGED OVER THE YEARS, BUT THEY'VE NEVER QUITE FOUND A GREAT ONE.

The tagline for Cinnamon Toast Crunch has changed a few times since 1984. From the straightforward “I'm feeling like Cinnamon Toast Crunch” to the more synesthetic “The taste you can see,” the cereal’s slogan has never been nearly as memorable as other cereal’s taglines (think Frosted Flakes's "They're grrreat!" or "Silly rabbit, Trix are for kids!"). Since 2009, Cinnamon Toast Crunch commercials have centered around the phrase “Crave those crazy squares," which could probably still use some work.

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Everything You Need to Know About Record Store Day
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The unlikely resurgence of vinyl as an alternative to digital music formats is made up of more than just a small subculture of purists. Today, more than 1400 independent record stores deal in both vintage and current releases. Those store owners and community supporters created Record Store Day in 2007 as a way of celebrating the grassroots movement that’s allowed a once-dying medium to thrive.

To commemorate this year’s Record Store Day on Saturday, April 21, a number of stores (a searchable list can be found here) will be offering promotional items, live music, signings, and more. While events vary widely by store, a number of artists will be issuing exclusive LPs that will be distributed around the country.

For Grateful Dead fans, a live recording of a February 27, 1969 show at Fillmore West in San Francisco will be released and limited to 6700 copies; Arcade Fire’s 2003 EP album will see a vinyl release for the first time, limited to 3000 copies; "Roxanne," the Police single celebrating its 40th anniversary this year, will see a 7-inch single release with the original jacket art.

The day also promises to be a big one for David Bowie fans. A special white vinyl version of 1977’s Bowie Now will be on shelves, along with Welcome to the Blackout (Live London ’78), a previously-unreleased, three-record set. Jimmy Page, Frank Zappa, Neil Young, and dozens of other artists will also be contributing releases.

No store is likely to carry everything you might want, so before making the stop, it might be best to call ahead and then plan on getting there early. If you’re one of the unlucky vinyl supporters without a brick and mortar store nearby, you can check out Discogs.com, which will be selling the special releases online.

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Live Smarter
The Little Known Airport Bookstore Program That Can Get You Half of What You Spend on Books Back
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Inflight entertainment is a necessary evil, but the price can quickly add up without the proper planning. Between Wi-Fi access and TV/movie packages, you can run into all kinds of annoying additional charges that will only increase the longer your flight is. Thankfully, there is one way to minimize the cost of your inflight entertainment that’s a dream for any reader.

Paradies Lagardère, which runs more than 850 stores in 98 airports across the U.S. and Canada, has an attractive Read and Return program for all the books they sell. All you have to do is purchase a title, read it, and return it to a Paradies Lagardère-owned shop within six months and you'll get half your money back. This turns a $28 hardcover into a $14 one. Books in good condition are re-sold for half the price by the company, while books with more wear and tear are donated to charity.

If you haven’t heard of Paradies Lagardère, don’t worry—you’ve probably been in one of their stores. They’re the company behind a range of retail spots in airports, including licensed ventures like The New York Times Bookstore and CNBC News, and more local shops exclusive to the city you're flying out of. They also run restaurants, travel essentials stores, and specialty shops. 

Not every Paradies Lagardère store sells books, though, and the company doesn’t operate out of every airport, so you’ll need to do a little research before just buying a book the next time you fly. Luckily, the company does have an online map that shows every airport it operates out of and which stores are there.

There is one real catch to remember: You must keep the original receipt of the book if you want to return it and get your money back. If you're the forgetful type, just follow PureWow’s advice and use the receipt as a bookmark and you’ll be golden.

For frequent flyers who plan ahead, this program can ensure that your inflight entertainment will never break the bank.

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