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10 Sweet Facts About Cinnamon Toast Crunch

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Cinnamon Toast Crunch has been serving up crunchy little squares of deliciousness since 1984. Besides cinnamon and sugar, the cereal is made with wheat and rice to mimic the taste of cinnamon toast. Read on for 10 sweet things you might not know about Cinnamon Toast Crunch.

1. EVERYONE LOVED CHEF WENDELL.

Every good cereal needs a mascot, and Cinnamon Toast Crunch is no different. Chef Wendell is the rotund little baker who first appeared on the cereal’s boxes and TV commercials in 1987. Wearing glasses, a white baker’s hat, and an apron, Chef Wendell is a jolly old man who sang while he baked, and was sometimes seen with two other (younger, and more slender) bakers.

2. RUMOR HAS IT THAT WENDELL WAS RESPONSIBLE FOR THE DISAPPEARANCE OF THE OTHER TWO BAKERS.

In 1991, Wendell’s two coworkers in the bakery (named Bob and Quello) disappeared from all Cinnamon Toast Crunch commercials and cereal boxes. Fans jokingly speculated that Wendell was jealous of his coworkers’ youth and buffer bodies, so he drowned them in a cinnamon swirl river. In reality, General Mills stated that consumer feedback led them to remove the other two bakers and feature Chef Wendell more prominently.

3. IN 2009, GENERAL MILLS FIRED WENDELL AND INTRODUCED THE CRAZY SQUARES.

Since 2009, Cinnamon Toast Crunch boxes haven’t shown Chef Wendell’s image. Instead, General Mills has moved on to a different mascot, the Crazy Squares, who made their television debut in 2010. The Crazy Squares are anthropomorphic pieces of cereal with cinnamon swirls on them.

4. THE CEREAL HAS SPAWNED SO MANY OTHER VARIETIES.

To capitalize on the popularity of Cinnamon Toast Crunch, General Mills introduced French Toast Crunch in 1995, offering little squares flavored like French toast rather than cinnamon toast. Peanut Butter Toast Crunch cereal, introduced in 2004, was a nutty variant of Cinnamon Toast Crunch, while Frosted Toast Crunch and Chocolate Toast Crunch had a sugary vanilla and chocolate coating, respectively. General Mills also created Sugar Cookie Toast Crunch to replicate the taste of Christmas cookies … for breakfast.

5. FRENCH TOAST CRUNCH WAS THE MOST POPULAR SPINOFF.

In 2006, General Mills removed French Toast Crunch from supermarket shelves due to low sales, but after years of tweets and fan mail, General Mills revealed that French Toast Crunch would be coming back to the American market in 2015. (The Canadian version had been available north of the border the whole time.) Thanks to the passion and perseverance of fans, French Toast Crunch is proof that sometimes Facebook petitions actually work.

6. MONOPOLY ONCE GOT IN ON THE CINNAMON TOAST CRUNCH ACTION.

Or, at least, they probably did. In 2003, General Mills partnered with the board game Monopoly to release a limited edition Monopoly cereal. The cereal consisted of cereal squares that looked suspiciously like Cinnamon Toast Crunch mixed with colored, Lucky Charms-esque marshmallows modeled after Monopoly cards and hotels. Nice idea, but playing with your food when it's soaked in milk is difficult.

7. NOT ONLY CAN YOU EAT CINNAMON TOAST CRUNCH, YOU CAN VAPE IT.

Cinnamon Toast Crunch is such a popular flavor that you can even smoke it. E-cigarette users can inexplicably purchase a few different Cinnamon Toast Crunch flavors, so now you can have your cereal and vape it too.

8. NEVER FEAR, YOU CAN PROBABLY FIND CINNAMON TOAST CRUNCH ABROAD.

In Montreal and other parts of Quebec, Cinnamon Toast Crunch is called Croque-Cannelle, while in the UK and Ireland it now goes by Curiously Cinnamon (which also has a strawberry-flavored variant called Curiously Strawberry). In Poland, Cinnamon Toast Crunch is called Cini Minis, and it features the same images of the Crazy Squares in advertising.

9. SELFIE-SPOONS EXIST THANKS TO CINNAMON TOAST CRUNCH.

In 2015, General Mills announced that it was giving away free Cinnamon Toast Crunch selfie spoons, a.k.a. two-and-a-half-foot selfie sticks with spoons attached to them. This marketing campaign gave 1000 selfie spoons to Cinnamon Toast Crunch/selfie lovers, who only had to pay for shipping and handling. As the tagline for the selfie spoon said, “If you don’t post it on social media, did it really happen?” Truly the question of our time.

10. SLOGANS HAVE CHANGED OVER THE YEARS, BUT THEY'VE NEVER QUITE FOUND A GREAT ONE.

The tagline for Cinnamon Toast Crunch has changed a few times since 1984. From the straightforward “I'm feeling like Cinnamon Toast Crunch” to the more synesthetic “The taste you can see,” the cereal’s slogan has never been nearly as memorable as other cereal’s taglines (think Frosted Flakes's "They're grrreat!" or "Silly rabbit, Trix are for kids!"). Since 2009, Cinnamon Toast Crunch commercials have centered around the phrase “Crave those crazy squares," which could probably still use some work.

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Live Smarter
The Only Way to Answer ‘What Is Your Greatest Weakness?’ In a Job Interview
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Thanks in part to the influence of Silicon Valley and its focus on the psychological probing of job applicants, interview questions have been steadily getting more and more abstract. As part of the interview process, today's job seekers might be asked to describe a vending machine to someone who’s never seen one before, or plan a fantasy date with a famous historical figure.

Even if the company you’re approaching isn’t fully on board with prodding your brain, at some point you may still come up against one of the most common queries applicants face: "What is your greatest weakness?"

"Some 'experts' will tell you to try and turn a strength into a 'weakness,' to make yourself look good," writes Inc. contributor Justin Bariso. "That advice is garbage."

"Think about it," Bariso continues. "Interviewers are asking the same question to countless candidates. Just try and guess how many times they hear the answers 'being a perfectionist' or 'working too much.' (Hint: way too often.)"

While responding that you work too hard might seem like a reliable method of moving the conversation along, there’s a better way. And it involves being sincere.

"The fact is, it's not easy to identify one's own weaknesses," Bariso writes. "Doing so takes intense self-reflection, critical thinking, and the ability to accept negative feedback—qualities that have gone severely missing in a world that promotes instant gratification and demands quick (often thoughtless) replies to serious issues."

Bariso believes the question is an effective way to reveal an applicant’s self-awareness, which is why companies often use it in their vetting process. By being self-aware, people (and employees) can correct behavior that might be affecting job performance. So the key is to give this question some actual thought before it’s ever posed to you.

What is your actual greatest weakness? It could be that, in a desire to please everyone, you wind up making decisions based on the urge to avoid disappointing others. That’s a weakness that sounds authentic.

Pondering the question also has another benefit: It prompts you to think of areas in your life that could use some course-correcting. Even if you don’t land that job—or even if the question is never posed to you—you’ve still made time for self-reflection. The result could mean a more confident and capable presence for that next interview.

[h/t Inc.]

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Words
This Is the Most Commonly Misspelled Word on Job Resumes
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by Reader's Digest Editors

Your resume is your first chance to make a good impression with hiring managers. One misspelled word might not seem like a huge deal, but it can mean the difference between looking competent and appearing lazy. A 2014 Accountemps survey of 300 senior managers found that 63 percent of employers would reject a job candidate who had just one or two typos on their resume.

Most misspellings on resumes slip through the cracks because spellcheck doesn’t catch them. The most common misspelling on resumes is a shockingly simple word—or so you’d think.

Career coach and resume writer Jared Redick of Resume Studio in San Francisco tells Business Insider that the most common misspelling he sees by far is confusing “lead” with “led.” If you’re talking about how you run meetings at your current job, the correct spelling is “lead,” which is in the present tense. If the bullet point is from a former position, use lead’s past tense: led. Yes, “lead” as in the metal can also be pronounced “led,” but most people have no need to discuss chemical elements on their job resumes.

 
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Other spelling mistakes Redick has seen pop up over and over again on resumes is spelling “definitely” as “definately” (which spellcheck thankfully should catch) and adding an e in “judgment” (“judgement” is the British spelling, but “judgment” is preferred in American English).

To avoid the cringe factor of noticing little typos after sending out your application—especially if your misspelling actually is a real word that spellcheck recognizes—always proofread your resume before submitting. Slowly reading it out loud will take just a few minutes, but it could mean the difference between an interview and a rejection.

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