Batman and Superman Square Off as Rock 'Em Sock 'Em Robots

For generations, children have battled it out with the classic game Rock 'Em Sock 'Em Robots. The objective: punch your opponent's bot until its head pops up. Then, the loser resets and the friendly fight continues. For the highly anticipated new film Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice, Mattel gave the toy a cool upgrade by turning the usual red and blue robots into the warring comic book protagonists.

Instead of the heroes losing their heads, you know you've won this contest when the other player's figure "flies" off its platform, according to Amazon. The game's Batman dons the Bat Armor exosuit that is shown in the movie trailers, while Superman wears the classic red-and-blue suit and cape. The toy will join a host of other Mattel special editions of Rock 'Em Sock 'Em Robots, including Toy Story 2, Superman Returns, and Masters of the UniverseYou can pick up your own Rock 'Em Sock 'Em Robots: Batman v. Superman Edition for $25 on Amazon.

Images via Amazon

[h/t: Laughing Squid]

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iStock
The NES Classic Edition Is Returning to Stores June 29
iStock
iStock

It wasn’t easy to land an NES Classic Edition when Nintendo released it in November 2016. In fact, it was nearly impossible. Stores were selling through their (extremely limited) stock within hours of hitting shelves, and soon enough, the only way to actually get one was to pay well above the MSRP on eBay or through a scalper.

Nintendo is now giving people another shot to satisfy their 8-bit nostalgia as the company announced that the NES Classic Edition will be hitting stores yet again starting June 29. Best Buy has already gotten out in front of it, announcing that they will be using a ticketing system for the console similar to how they treat Black Friday—and both in-store and online orders will be limited to just one per customer.

Chances are, many major retailers that got shipments in 2016 will get new stock on Friday, but no one knows how many each store will get, exactly. Thrillist got in touch with stores like ThinkGeek—which said "We do know it will be similar to last time. So, people will have to act fast."—and GameStop, where some stores may just see 10 units overall on Friday. If you want to make sure you're not wasting your time, call ahead.

This all may sound like more gloom and doom from Nintendo, but in a Facebook post about the release, the company did say both the NES and SNES Classic Editions will be available through the end of the year, meaning that while you might not score one on the 29th, you could still get one with a little patience.

The NES Classic hitting stores on June 29 will be the same one released in 2016, with 30 pre-loaded games, like Super Mario Bros. 3 and The Legend of Zelda, retailing at $59.99. The company's renewed interest in the Classic Edition isn't just a U.S. thing; on July 7, gamers in Japan will be able to pick up a special gold Famicom Mini loaded with 20 games based on popular manga series like Dragon Ball, Saint Seiya, and Fist of the North Star. Don't expect that one to make its way stateside, though.

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Revell
Flying Saucer Toy Recalled for Its Misleading Take on Nazi History
Revell
Revell

A German toy has been recalled from shelves over concerns that it promoted an inaccurate glorification of Nazi history, Gizmodo's Paleofuture blog reports.

The toy in question, a 69-part model of a flying saucer called the Haunebu II, was inspired by a Nazi aircraft design that never flew. In the product description, its manufacturer, Revell, called it the "first space flight-capable object in the world," claiming it could fly "up to speeds of 6,000 kilometers per hour," or the equivalent of more than 3700 miles per hour. The image on the box showed a Nazi flying saucer covered in emblems of the Third Reich shooting down Allied planes. (The product is no longer listed on Revell's site, but there's a cached version here.)

The Nazis did want to develop space-ready aircraft, but they didn't succeed. They definitely never made a functional flying saucer like the one Revell was selling—it wouldn't have been technologically possible, historian Jens Wehner of the Military History Museum in Dresden explained to the German newspaper Frankfurter Allgemeine. You don't get that sense from the product's design, packaging, and product description, though, which claims that "airworthy prototypes" of the flying saucer flew in 1943 and that the project was halted by World War II.

Suggesting that the Nazis had access to secret, superior space technology might lead some model builders to doubt current historical understanding of the Third Reich, fueling conspiracy theories. And it doesn't help that if there are two things conspiracy theorists love, it's Nazis and UFOs. Some already falsely claim that Germans set up a rocket-launch base in Antarctica and landed on the moon as early as 1942 (neither of which happened, we should emphasize), and toys like this only add to those myths.

Germany has strict laws designed to prevent anyone from glorifying its Nazi history, including statutes that criminalize Holocaust denial and banning anything that idealizes or pays homage to the Third Reich, including swastikas and Nazi salutes. In Austria, where Nazi glorification is also illegal, a Hitler impersonator was arrested in 2017 for posing for photos outside the dictator’s birthplace.

Revell's misleading flying saucer toy wasn't discontinued as a direct result of those laws, though. Instead, the company yanked the product after complaints from organizations like the German Children's Protection Association (DKSB) and Dresden's Military History Museum. The company is currently investigating how a product covered in Nazi symbols got to market at all.

[h/t Gizmodo]

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