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The Average American Lives 18 Miles From Their Mom

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Older parents might suffer from the effects of empty nest syndrome, but according to data from the University of Michigan’s Health and Retirement Study, when kids in America fly the coop, they don’t go very far.

The New York Times analyzed the survey of older Americans and found that on average, adults live just 18 miles from mom (researchers tend to focus on mothers because they are often the caregivers, and generally live longer than their male counterpart). The analysis also found that only 20 percent of Americans live more than a few hours from their parents by car.

It’s worth reading the full analysis over at the Times, but generally speaking, the close proximities are a result of families who rely on each other for support, both financially and practically. Americans have become less and less mobile over the course of the last few decades, in particular those with less education and lower incomes.

Economist Robert A. Pollak told the Times: “It speaks to a class divide in the population. Particularly as you go further down the socioeconomic scale, people are living pretty close to their parents, and this means they're able to provide help.”

The median distance from mom is farthest on the West Coast and in the Mountain States, and closest in the Northeast (Pennsylvania and New York) and South. Similarly, a 2010 Pew Research Center survey found that 37 percent of Americans have never lived outside their hometown, while 57 percent have never left their home state.

The overall trend is expected to continue as baby boomers are increasingly in need of caretaking and as more and more double-income families look for help with child care.

See how your state measures up and read more about the findings over at The Upshot.

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This Tool Knows If Robots Are Coming for Your Job
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If you work as a cashier, you may want to polish your resume. According to the online tool “Will Robots Take My Job?” there’s a 97 percent chance your position will be replaced with technology in the not-too-distant future. Pharmacists, on the other hand, can breathe easier—they face a 1.2 percent risk level of unemployment by automation.

As Geek.com reports, the website, developed by Mubashar Iqbal and designed by Dimitar Raykov, can calculate the stability of 702 jobs. It pulls its data from a 2013 report titled "The Future of Employment: How susceptible are jobs to computerisation?” The original study projects that 47 percent of U.S. jobs risk becoming obsolete as technology advances.

To see which side of the workforce your occupation falls on, type your title into the search bar on the main page. The tool brings up your automation risk level (ranging from “Totally safe” to "You are doomed”), the job’s projected growth, and median salary and employment numbers from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

With some positions, like bank tellers (risk level of 98 percent) and telemarketers (99 percent), apps and automations are already starting to phase out human beings. Fortunately, there are still plenty of tasks a robot can’t be programmed to execute. So people with creative jobs, like writing songs or naming paint colors, are safe for now.

[h/t Geek]

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Toblerone Now Has Fewer Triangles—and Customers Are Outraged
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Haldean Brown via Flickr // CC BY-SA 2.0

UK fans of the Swiss chocolate bar Toblerone are in for a rude awakening when they peel back the candy’s iconic triangular package: In an effort to cut costs, Toblerone’s makers Mondelez International have redesigned the bar with fewer peaks—and consumers definitely mind the gap.

As The Guardian reports, the decision to reduce the weight of their UK product was made in light of rising ingredient prices. Toblerone wrote on their Facebook page: "…to ensure Toblerone remains on-shelf, is affordable and retains the triangular shape, we have had to reduce the weight of just two of our bars in the UK." Those two bars, the 400-gram and the 170-gram, are now 360 grams and 150 grams respectively thanks to large gaps where there were once solid chocolate chunks.

Unsurprisingly, Toblerone’s customer base hasn't embraced the change. One Twitter user characterized the redesign as "a chocolate bar of disappointment" while another compared it to a bicycle rack. The classic look, originally meant to evoke the Swiss Alps, is now more reminiscent of Holland in the opinion of one Facebook commenter.

Toblerone’s announcement didn’t mention Brexit by name, but that hasn’t stopped some angered chocolate lovers from making the connection. Since the UK’s vote to leave the European Union in June, the devaluation of the British pound has had an impact on everything from model trains to Marmite. A shortage of the latter sent buyers into a panic last month before the pricing dispute between supermarkets and the maker was quickly settled. Toblerone fans aren't feeling so optimistic about the outcome of this latest Brexit casualty:

[h/t The Guardian]

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