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Infographic: What Are the Most Powerful Sci-Fi Weapons?

If you’re the kind of sci-fi fan who knows who played the Doctor's seventh regeneration, uses the Klingon word for “success” (qapla') in casual conversation, and has debated with friends over whether an Imperial Star Destroyer could really defeat the USS Enterprise, then this infographic from FatWallet is for you.

The chart pits the most lethal weapons in the science fiction universe against one another, helping true fans determine, once and for all, which deadly contraption is the most powerful. And unlike many long-winded speculative arguments about sci-fi, this one is grounded in real-life science.

“We worked with physicists and engineers on this infographic, which breaks down iconic weapons and their energy of devastation in joules, an energy measurement of 'work done,'” the creators over at Fat Wallet wrote. “In some cases, we drew data from source material or compared the weapons to real-life versions. In others, we attempted to calculate energy requirements for destruction shown in movies and TV shows. And in the case of reality-warping, fantastic weapons from the limits of our imagination, we drew help from theoretical physics.”

Some of these findings—for instance, the revelation that a lightsaber could easily destroy Han Solo’s blaster—aren’t surprising. However, it’s still fun to see the fictional creations pitted against one another. For more imaginary space battle fodder, check out the full diagram below.

[h/t FatWallet]

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CBS
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Pop Culture
The One Word You Can't Say on Star Trek
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CBS

When it premiered in 1966, Star Trek presented a world unlike anything else on television at the time. But there was one frontier even its creator wouldn’t venture into: As Entertainment Weekly reports, the word "God" must never be mentioned on the show.

The rule originated with Star Trek’s creator, Gene Roddenberry, and will be followed by the makers of the franchise’s newest property, Star Trek: Discovery, which premieres in September. According to the writer Kirsten Beyer, the new series adheres to Roddenberry’s idea of "a science-driven 23rd-century future where religion basically no longer exists." That doesn’t just mean that religion shouldn’t interfere with the plot; even a casual "for God’s sake" ad libbed by an actor won't make it into a final cut.

Roddenberry was known for creating several cardinal rules for the Star Trek universe. Besides forbidding any mention of religion, he also maintained that crews should be diverse, characters should avoid meddling with other cultures, and there should be no serious interpersonal conflicts aboard the vessel (you can read more about his vision in the Star Trek: The Next Generation show bible [PDF]). But even the showrunners of Star Trek: Discovery don’t promise to stay 100 percent faithful to Roddenberry’s wishes. They’ve already stated that they’re abandoning his rule about conflict in favor of more realistic drama. So if their position on the God rule changes, it won’t be unprecedented.

[h/t Entertainment Weekly]

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Pop Culture
Neil deGrasse Tyson Recruits George R.R. Martin to Work on His New Video Game
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Kevin Winter / Getty Images

George R.R. Martin has been keeping busy with the latest installment of his Song of Ice and Fire series, but that doesn’t mean he has no time for side projects. As The Daily Beast reports, the fantasy author is taking a departure from novel-writing to work on a video game helmed by Neil deGrasse Tyson.

DeGrasse Tyson’s game, titled Space Odyssey, is currently seeking funding on Kickstarter. He envisions an interactive, desktop experience that will allow players to create and explore their own planets while learning about physics at the same time. To do this correctly, he and his team are working with some of the brightest minds in science like Bill Nye, former NASA astronaut Mike Massimino, and astrophysicist Charles Liu. The list of collaborators also includes a few unexpected names—like Martin, the man who gave us Game of Thrones.

Though Martin has more experience writing about dragons in Westeros than robots in outer space, deGrasse Tyson believes his world-building skills will be essential to the project. “For me [with] Game of Thrones ... I like that they’re creating a world that needs to be self-consistent,” deGrasse Tyson told The Daily Beast. “Create any world you want, just make it self-consistent, and base it on something accessible. I’m a big fan of Mark Twain’s quote: ‘First get your facts straight. Then distort them at your leisure.’”

Other giants from the worlds of science fiction and fantasy, including Neil Gaiman and Len Wein (co-creator of Marvel's Wolverine character), have signed on to help with that same part of the process. The campaign for Space Odyssey has until Saturday, July 29 to reach its $314,159 funding goal—of which it has already raised more than $278,000. If the video game gets completed, you can expect it to be the nerdiest Neil deGrasse Tyson project since his audiobook with LeVar Burton.

[h/t The Daily Beast]

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