This Oscillating Fan Video Is Blowing Netflix Users Away

What are the top five most popular videos across Netflix and Amazon Prime right now? A dark comedy starring Tom Hanks, an animated film, two documentaries—and an hour-long video of an oscillating fan. Appropriately titled Oscillating Fan For Your Home, the video features 60 minutes of uninterrupted fan oscillation, and is currently in fifth place on the website Instant Watcher, which ranks the popularity of streaming shows and movies.

To put that in perspective, Oscillating Fan For Your Home is currently more popular than Netflix documentary phenomenon Making A Murderer, and is one step above Parks and Recreation in today’s rankings.

Decider notes that the creators of the fan video may be trying to put a summer twist on the classic Yule Log film, which features uninterrupted burning log footage for folks without fireplaces. The Netflix description seems to corroborate that analysis: “Nothing says Yuletide ambiance like a gorgeous oscillating fan,” reads the description. “Keep the holidays cool with a soft, electric whir: the ideal backdrop for family fun!” If you're a fan of fans, check out the trailer for Oscillating Fan For Your Home above.

[h/t: Instant Watcher, Decider]

Banner Image Credit: Netflix Australia & New Zealand, YouTube

Matthew Simmons/Getty Images
How Accurate are Hollywood Medical Dramas? A Doctor Breaks It Down
Matthew Simmons/Getty Images
Matthew Simmons/Getty Images

Medical dramas like Grey's Anatomy get a lot of things wrong when it comes to the procedures shown on the screen, but unless you're a doctor, you'd probably never notice.

For its latest installment, WIRED's Technique Critique video series—which previously blessed us with a dialect coach's critique of actors' onscreen accents—tackled the accuracy of medical scenes in movies and TV, bringing in Annie Onishi, a general surgery resident at Columbia University, to comment on emergency room and operating scenes from Pulp Fiction, House, Scrubs, and more.

While Onishi breaks down just how inaccurate these shows and movies can be, she makes it clear that Hollywood doesn't always get it wrong. Some shows, including Showtime's historical drama The Knick, garner praise from Onishi for being true-to-life with their medical jargon and operations. And when doctors discuss what music to play during surgery on Scrubs? That's "a tale as old as time in the O.R.," according to Onishi.

Other tropes are very obviously ridiculous, like slapping a patient during CPR and telling them to fight, which we see in a scene from The Abyss. "Rule number one of CPR is: never stop effective chest compressions in order to slap or yell words of encouragement at the patient," Onishi says. "Yelling at a patient or cheering them on has never brought them back to life." And obviously, taking selfies in the operating room in the middle of a grisly operation like the doctors on Grey's Anatomy do would get you fired in real life.

There are plenty of cliché words and phrases we hear over and over on doctor shows, and some are more accurate than others. Asking about a patient's vitals is authentic, according to Onishi, who says it's something doctors are always concerned with. However, yelling "We're losing him!" is simply for added TV drama. "I have never once heard that in my real life," Onishi says.

[h/t WIRED]

#RateaSpecies? Zoos Share Amazon-Style Reviews of Animals on Twitter

The online rating system popularized by sites like Amazon and Yelp has finally reached the animal kingdom. As Earther reports, zoos, aquariums, and science museums are taking to Twitter to review fuzzy, scaly, and feathery specimens with the hashtag #rateaspecies.

The official Twitter account of the Oregon Zoo kicked off the trend on March 9 by tweeting out a picture of a river otter with a four-star review. "Overall very good first impressions," the tweet reads. "Sturdy built, totally winter-ready and waterproof. Only comes in brown but that’s actually a plus for me." Shervin Hess, who runs digital media at the zoo, told Earther he got the idea from an Amazon review he read that described hiking boots in a similar way.

He followed the tweet with reviews of other animals, each one receiving a four-star rating (Hess says he wouldn't consider giving an animal anything less). Soon other institutions on Twitter started jumping on the hashtag.

"High-quality squeak system, thrives in rocky situations," the Yosemite Conservancy wrote of the pika. It earned four stars despite being "maybe TOO cute" and a "potential pun hazard."

Check out more of the top-rated species below.

[h/t Earther]


More from mental floss studios