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Google Is Testing a New Way to Kill Passwords

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Remembering long and elaborate passwords for multiple accounts can be difficult. Fortunately, Google is trying to make life easier for its users by killing traditional passwords altogether. The tech giant is currently testing a new method for logging into your Gmail account on a computer with verification through your smartphone.

User Rohit Paul posted about Google’s invitation to the testing process on Reddit’s Android community, and explained how it will work: When you set up and authorize your smartphone with the new password-less service, Google will send your Android or iOS device a notification to verify your identity whenever you log into a computer with your Gmail account. Once you’re approved and confirmed, you’re in! Confirmation can be anything from a simple PIN number to your fingerprint on biometric-enabled smartphones.

However, if you’re old-fashioned and simply want to use your regular Gmail password instead, Google gives you that option, too. The company is also providing users with ways to deactivate their devices in the event they’re lost or stolen. The new service would be an additional layer of protection from malicious attacks, such as phishing operations, which trick users into logging into false, yet authentic-looking websites using their real passwords.

“We’ve invited a small group of users to help test a new way to sign in to their Google accounts, no password required,” a Google spokesperson confirmed in a statement. “‘Pizza,’ ‘password,’ and ‘123456’—your days are numbered.”

[h/t Mashable]

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AI Algorithm Tells You the Ingredients in Your Meal Based on a Picture
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Your food photography habit could soon be good for more than just updating your Instagram. As Gizmodo reports, a new AI algorithm is trained to analyze food photos and match them with a list of ingredients and recipes.

The tool was developed by researchers at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL). To build it, they compiled information from sites like All Recipes and Food.com into a database dubbed Recipe1M, according to their paper. With more than a million annotated recipes at its disposal, a neural network then sifted through each one, learning about which ingredients are associated with which types of images along the way.

The result is Pic2Recipe, an algorithm that can deduce key details about a food item just by looking at its picture. Show it a picture of a cookie, for example, and it will tell you it likely contains sugar, butter, eggs, and flour. It will also recommend recipes for something similar pulled from the Recipe1M database.

Pic2Recipe is still a work in progress. While it has had success with simple recipes, more complicated items—like smoothies or sushi rolls, for example—seem to confuse the system. Overall, it suggests recipes with an accuracy rate of about 65 percent.

Researchers see their creation being used as a recipe search engine or as a tool for situations where nutritional information is lacking. “If you know what ingredients went into a dish but not the amount, you can take a photo, enter the ingredients, and run the model to find a similar recipe with known quantities, and then use that information to approximate your own meal,” lead author Nick Hynes told MIT News.

Before taking the project any further, the team plans to present its work at the Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition Conference in Honolulu later this month.

[h/t Gizmodo]

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Dungeons & Dragons Gets a Digital Makeover
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Since the 1970s, players have been constructing elaborate campaigns in Dungeons & Dragons using nothing but paper, pencils, rule books, and 20-sided dice. That simple formula has made D&D the quintessential role-playing game, but the game's publisher thinks it can be improved with a few 21st-century updates. As The Verge reports, Wizards of the Coast is launching a digital toolset meant to enhance the gaming experience.

The tool, called D&D Beyond, isn’t meant to be a replacement for face-to-face gameplay. Rather, it’s designed to save players time and energy that could be better spent developing characters or battling orcs. The resource includes a fifth-edition rule book users can search by keyword. At the start of a new campaign, they can build monsters and characters within the program. And players don’t need to worry about forgetting to bring their notes to a quest—D&D Beyond keeps track of information like items and spells in one convenient location.

"D&D Beyond speaks to the way gamers are able to blend digital tools with the fun of storytelling around the table with your friends,” Nathan Stewart, senior director of Dungeons & Dragons, said in a statement when the concept was first announced. "These tools represent a way forward for D&D.”

This isn’t the first attempt to bring D&D into the digital age; videogames inspired by the fictional world have been produced since the 1980s. Unlike those titles, though, D&D Beyond will still highlight the imagination-fueled role-playing aspect of the game when it launches August 15.

[h/t The Verge]

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