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8 Bunk Beds That Are (Almost) Too Cool to Sleep In

If you’re sharing a bedroom with someone, it's either going to be super fun or a super drag and either way, an awesome bunk bed is the perfect thing to add some practical whimsy. Ditch generic twofer beds most commonly seen in college dorms and hostels around the world and consider a few of the options below. They're sure to turn sleepy time into an event—every single night.

1. STAR WARS IMPERIAL WALKER

Jonathan Wentworth // Screenshot via YouTube

Did you hear that? It’s the sound of millions of Star Wars fans crying out in envy. The owners of this themed bunk bed are maybe the luckiest kids in the galaxy, and they probably weren't even alive when the prequels hit theaters.

2. ECTO-1 CAR

Image via Dave Delisle

This ghost-busting design is sadly only a concept, but all great ideas have to start somewhere! Designer Dave Delisle used the iconic Ecto-1 1959 Cadillac Professional for inspiration for this cool creation, with the roof rack serving as a barrier for the top bunk, and the hood of the car providing additional bedroom storage.

3. JURASSIC PARK RAPTOR CAGE

Dave Delisle also designed this Jurassic Park-themed Velociraptor cage concept bed. The door slides closed to keep the wild animal (read: kid) inside, and the exterior has the industrial feel of a high-tech containment system from the film. Delisle writes on his website: “My only qualm with this design is having to punch out a hole in the bed frame at the top of the ladder, which prevents this from looking exactly like the raptor cage; however that’s in keeping with all bunk bed designs, so safety and accessibility should be considered for a real-life bed.”

4. SOFA BUNK BED

Couches that transform into beds are nothing new, but designing a couch with a hidden bunk bed inside is something special. The full conversion only takes about 20 seconds, so the transition from watching a movie to meeting the sandman is always a quick one. Now all we need is a name for this extra-special futon. 

5. SURF SHACK

Image via YouTube

Kids can enjoy the beach year-round with this indoor surf shack. Using leftover and recycled materials and real water reeds, a handy dad spent two months building the structure for his sons. There's even a working doorbell and a coconut telephone so the kids can talk to each other from bed. We might make a motion for a sand-covered floor for authenticity, but mom and dad would likely have a problem with that. 

6. SUPER MARIO CASTLE

Image via Imgur 

Bring virtual reality into the real world with this kid-sized homage to retro gaming. The stairs to the top bunk are hidden behind 8-bit bricks, and the rest of the castle matches the style and color of the Super Mario landmark perfectly, with the archways serving as windows for the bottom bunk.

7. TOWERING PINK CASTLE

Image via Imgur

If Super Mario isn't the king of the castle in your home, fear not: There's a bunk bed castle for all tastes. Kids can rule their own kingdom from this big pink castle, with stairs on one side and a slide on the other, which the builder/mastermind admits is a little too steep: “My girls flew down it and right into the wall, but of course they laughed and said again,” user G00D_GUY wrote on Imgur. “After a few times they got the speed down.”

8. ROOM FOR THREE

Image via Imgur

Three is a crowd that doesn't feel too crowded in this deluxe custom build. This design has two beds on top and one on the bottom left, with extra space on the right that's perfect for a play area or a pet’s bed. While a feat of spatial efficiency, this design does come with a conundrum: Which sibling has to take the bottom while the other two get to party it up together in the penthouse?

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History
The Secret World War II History Hidden in London's Fences

In South London, the remains of the UK’s World War II history are visible in an unlikely place—one that you might pass by regularly and never take a second look at. In a significant number of housing estates, the fences around the perimeter are actually upcycled medical stretchers from the war, as the design podcast 99% Invisible reports.

During the Blitz of 1940 and 1941, the UK’s Air Raid Precautions department worked to protect civilians from the bombings. The organization built 60,000 steel stretchers to carry injured people during attacks. The metal structures were designed to be easy to disinfect in case of a gas attack, but that design ended up making them perfect for reuse after the war.

Many London housing developments at the time had to remove their fences so that the metal could be used in the war effort, and once the war was over, they were looking to replace them. The London County Council came up with a solution that would benefit everyone: They repurposed the excess stretchers that the city no longer needed into residential railings.

You can tell a stretcher railing from a regular fence because of the curves in the poles at the top and bottom of the fence. They’re hand-holds, designed to make it easier to carry it.

Unfortunately, decades of being exposed to the elements have left some of these historic artifacts in poor shape, and some housing estates have removed them due to high levels of degradation. The Stretcher Railing Society is currently working to preserve these heritage pieces of London infrastructure.

As of right now, though, there are plenty of stretchers you can still find on the streets. If you're in the London area, this handy Google map shows where you can find the historic fencing.

[h/t 99% Invisible]

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The Force Field Cloak
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Design
This Glowing Blanket Is Designed to Ease Kids' Fear of the Dark
The Force Field Cloak
The Force Field Cloak

Many kids have a security blanket they bring to bed with them every night, but sometimes, a regular blankie is no match for the monsters that invade their imaginations once the lights are off. Now there’s a glow-in-the-dark blanket designed to make children feel safer in bed, no night light required.

Dubbed the Force Field Cloak, the fleece blanket comes in several colorful, glowing patterns that remain invisible during the day. At night, you leave the blanket under a bright light for about 10 minutes, then the shining design will reveal itself in the dark. The glow lasts 8 to 10 hours, just long enough to get a child through the night.

Inventor Terry Sachetti was inspired to create the blanket by his own experiences struggling with scary nighttime thoughts as a kid. "I remember when I was young and afraid of the dark. I would lie in my bed at night, and my imagination would start getting the best of me," he writes on the product's Kickstarter page. "I would start thinking that someone or something was going to grab my foot that was hanging over the side of the bed. When that happened, I would put my foot back under my blanket where I knew I was safe. Nothing could get me under my blanket. No boogiemen, no aliens, no monsters under my bed, nothing. Sound familiar?"

The Force Field Cloak, which has already surpassed its funding goals on both Indiegogo and Kickstarter, takes the comfort of a blanket to the next level. The glowing, non-toxic ink decorating the material acts as a gentle night light that kids can wrap around their whole body. The result, the team claims, is a secure feeling that quiets those thoughts about bad guys hiding in the shadows.

To pre-order a Force Field Cloak, you can pledge $36 or more to the product’s Indiegogo campaign. It is expected to start shipping in January 2018.

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