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10 Robust Facts About the Rottweiler

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These dogs can either be fierce guard dogs or cuddly companions, depending on their upbringing. Learn more about this loyal canine. 

1. THEY MIGHT BE FROM ROME …

It is widely believed that these sturdy dogs are descendants of drover dogs in Ancient Rome. The mastiff-like dogs were used to pull carts, herd animals, and guard homes. Because of the need to control large animals like bulls, the dogs were bred to be strong and robust. 

2. … BUT THEY WERE PERFECTED IN GERMANY.

When Roman armies headed to Germany on their way to conquer Europe, they brought the Rottweiler's ancestors with them. Because there were no refrigerators at the time, the soldiers traveled with their cattle, rather than slaughter the cows for meat before the journey. And naturally, they needed assistance keeping their cattle in line. The Rottweiler’s ancestors were the perfect dogs for the job thanks to their endurance and strength. Along the way, the dogs were also used to guard and carry supplies. 

Eventually, in about 73 AD, the army stopped in the Wurtemberg area of Germany. The town that sprung up there filled with villas with red tiled roofs. The quaint settlement was known as das Rote Wilrot for the red tiles, and wil from the Roman word for "villa." Later, the town became known as Rottweil. The Roman dogs flourished there as herding and guard dogs. They eventually interbred with other local dogs to create the modern day Rottweiler. 

3. THEY ALMOST WENT EXTINCT. 

Towards the middle of the 19th century, paved roads and railroads started to change how livestock was brought to market. Herding dogs were no longer needed when transporting cattle, so Rottweilers found themselves out of a job. The numbers of Rotties continued to dwindle and clubs disappeared. The breed almost vanished entirely, but a small group of breeders fought hard to keep them around. In the 20th century, the breed found a new purpose serving in the military and on police forces. Rottweilers were introduced to the United States in 1910 where their popularity continued to grow. Today, the Rottweiler is the 10th most popular breed in the United States.

4. THERE ARE TWO WAYS TO PRONOUNCE THE NAME. 

The Rottweiler is a German breed, so if you want to pronounce it the German way, it’s rott-vile-er. Of course, if you’re in the United States, rott-why-ler is also acceptable. 

5. KEEP THEM AWAY FROM ANYTHING FRAGILE. 

Thanks to the Rottie’s history as a herder, the dog has a habit of bumping into people, animals, and things when it wants them to fall in line. While trained Rottweilers are gentle, breeders don’t recommend the dogs for households with young children or the elderly.

6. THEY ONLY HAVE ONE KIND OF MARKING. 

Rottweilers are always black with the same brown markings on their chest, face, and paws. According to the American Kennel Club, the brown spots can come in three different variations: Rust, tan, and mahogany. 

7. GERMAN ROTTWEILERS ARE SLIGHTLY DIFFERENT FROM AMERICAN ONES. 

German clubs have different breed standards than the AKC's. German Rotties tend to be a little larger and have long tails. In the United States, breeders still favor the docked tail, although the trend is beginning to shift towards keeping the tail intact. 

8. THEY HAVE A STRONG JAW. 

Thanks to their large head, Rottweilers have an impressively strong bite. Their jaws are stronger than German shepherds and pit bulls with a bite force of 328 pounds—that’s about half of a shark’s bite force, at 669 pounds.

9. TRAINING IS A MUST. 

Just like people, every Rottweiler is different. It’s very important to train your dog early and diligently to ensure a gentle pet. These are very powerful dogs and they need to be taught when to use that power and when to stand down. Thankfully, the dogs are very intelligent and eager to please, so training is fairly easy compared to the training needed for more aloof breeds. 

10. THEY’RE LOYAL.

Rottweilers have been bred as guard dogs, so they are known to form strong bonds with their owners. Often they will follow their family members from room to room. These loving dogs generally do not do well spending too much time by themselves and enjoy the company of others. Fiercely loyal, they have a strong guarding instinct that makes them very protective of their pack. 

All images courtesy of iStock.

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IKEA
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Animals
Get IKEA's New Pet Furniture Collection for Not a Lot of Scratch
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IKEA

The biggest surprise about IKEA's newest product line is that it has taken this long to debut. This week, the North American arm of the Swedish furniture giant unveiled a new assortment of furniture designed specifically for four-legged customers. Dubbed LURVIG (Swedish for “hairy”), pet owners can now browse IKEA aisles for everything from dog beds to cat scratching posts—many of which have a distinct IKEA twist.

Their pet couch ($49.95), for example, folds out into a bed; another bed is small enough to slide under a human-sized mattress. Their “cat house on legs” ($54.95) looks like a retro TV and allows space for a cat to stalk you from behind a screen.

An assortment of IKEA pet furniture
IKEA

The retailer solicited advice from veterinarians on product design that would be functional while sitting comfortably within the IKEA aesthetic. “It is quite important for IKEA to have a pet range that fits into our normal furniture range,” Barbara Schäfer, IKEA’s product risk assessment leader, told Curbed. “As a pet owner I can say, so far, the normal pet products are quite ugly.” (Don't hold back, Barbara.)

The LURVIG line is currently being rolled out to IKEA stores, but you’ll have to be willing to be your furry pal’s personal shopper; the company doesn’t allow pets in their stores, save for service animals.

[h/t Curbed]

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Mark Imhof
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Animals
Meet the New York City Groomer Giving Free Haircuts to Help Shelter Dogs Get Adopted
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Mark Imhof

Mark “The Dog Guy” Imhof works as an animal groomer in New York City, but his job entails more than just making pets look good on the outside. For the dogs that need his services most, a bath and a haircut can do wonders for their mood and potentially change their lives. That’s why when Imhof isn’t primping pets for his business, he’s offering his services for free to shelter dogs who are looking to get adopted.

The idea to start grooming rescue dogs struck Imhof when he adopted his first pit bull Cleo with his fiancée. “[She] was so utterly defeated when we brought her home,” he tells Mental Floss. “A simple shower just lifted her spirits and we thought, wouldn’t it be great if someone could go groom shelter animals? And it became me.”

Since then, Imhof has done pro bono work for dozens of adoptable pups in the New York City area, and of those dapper dogs many have gone home to loving families. Most of those who are still waiting to get adopted can be found at the Animal Care Centers of New York City.

The project has been ongoing for two years, and the demand for canine makeovers doesn’t look to be slowing down anytime soon. “The shelter workers and other incredible volunteers and foster parents of the animals all love to help get the animal looking better so it can find its furever (forever) home,” Imhof says.

Check out some of the before and after images from his Instagram below.

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