Heritage Auctions
Heritage Auctions

This Dime Minted Onto a Nail Is Expected to Fetch $10,000 at Auction

Heritage Auctions
Heritage Auctions

The most unusual item for sale at next month’s U.S. coins Heritage auction isn’t really a coin at all. It’s technically a zinc nail whose center has been imprinted with the head and tail sides of a Roosevelt dime.

Mint errors that slip into circulation, like coins struck with the wrong dates or onto the wrong materials, are often hot ticket items at coin auctions. Thousands of rare coins will be hitting the auction block at the Heritage auction in Tampa, Fla. next month, but it’s this nail dime that’s been stirring up buzz. The item is expected to ultimately sell for around $10,000, and early online bids have already reached $7500

While this type of mistake is rare, it’s not unprecedented—in the late 1970s, a handful of U.S. pennies were struck onto nails. It’s also possible that this particular misprint wasn’t a mistake at all and was created deliberately by a rebellious employee. The nail dime is undated, so little can be said about the item’s history.

No matter how it originated, the dime is still expected to go for a pretty penny once it hits the auction on January 6. And as for whether or not the coin can be used as valid currency, the U.S. Mint told AP they had no comment.  

Heritage Auctions

[h/t AP]

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Expedia Just Made Its Vacation Bundle Deal a Lot More Convenient
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Saving money by booking your hotel and flight together sounds like a no-brainer—until it actually comes time to do it. Picking the right accommodations for a trip requires a lot of research, and if you're in a rush to do it at the same time that you're comparing airfares, you may end up stuck with a choice you regret. Now, Expedia is taking the stress out of its vacation bundle offer by letting customers book flights and accommodations separately. As Travel + Leisure reports, customers can take advantage of the deal as long as they choose a hotel sometime between booking a flight (or rental car) and their first day of vacation.

Previously, Expedia customers looking to save hundreds by bundling had to purchase their plane tickets and reserve hotel rooms at the same time. Not only does that require a lot of planning in a short timeframe, but it also requires you to pay a significant chunk of your vacation budget up front. And while international flights are cheapest when booked months in advance, the same can't always be said for hotels, which sometimes show their best prices at the last minute.

Expedia's update relieves a lot of the pressure from the decision-making process. When users book their flight, they will now see an option labeled “Expedia Add-On Advantage.” If they also plan to find their hotel through Expedia, they can select the offer and reap the savings, even if they don't book it immediately. According to the company, customers can save up to 43 percent on hotel prices as long as they book a room before their flight leaves.

Gearing up for your next vacation? If you want to travel on a budget this summer—or any time of year—we suggest following these tips.

[h/t Travel + Leisure]

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$2.5 Million in World War II-Era Cash Discovered Beneath Winston Churchill's Former Tailor's Shop
Evening Standard, Getty Images
Evening Standard, Getty Images

A valuable secret has been hiding beneath the floorboards of a sporting goods store in the UK since World War II. As the BBC reports, about £30,000 in roughly 80-year-old British bank notes was unearthed by a renovation project at the Cotswold Outdoor store in Brighton. Adjusting for inflation, their value would be equal to roughly $2.5 million today.

Owner Russ Davis came across the hidden treasure while tearing out decades-worth of carpet and tiles beneath the property. What he initially assumed was a block of wood turned out to be a wad of cash caked in dirt. Each bundle held about £1000 worth of £1 and £5 notes, with about 30 bundles in total.

The bills are badly damaged, but one surviving design element holds an important clue to their history. Each note is printed in blue, the color of the emergency wartime currency first issued by the Bank of England in 1940.

At the time the money was buried, the property was home to the famous British furrier and couturier Bradley Gowns. Prime Minister Winston Churchill and his wife, Lady Clementine Churchill, were reportedly regular customers.

The reason the fortune was stowed beneath the building in the first place remains a mystery. Davis imagines that it might have come from a bank robbery, while Howard Bradley, heir to the Bradley Gowns family business, suspects it might have been stashed there as a getaway fund in anticipation of a Nazi invasion, as he told the New York Post.

The hoard will remain in the possession of the Sussex police as more details on the story emerge.

[h/t BBC]

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