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An Algorithm Can Tell How Forgettable Your Selfies Are

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According to a recent survey, the average millennial will take over 25,000 selfies in his/her lifetime. Science Alert reports that researchers at the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have developed a new algorithm that could help shutterbugs better distinguish between the forgettable and the memorable photos before posting them to social media accounts.

The algorithm is called "MemNet," and was actually designed to work for all photos, not just self-portraits. According to a CSAIL report [PDF] authored by graduate student Aditya Khosla and his MIT colleagues, MemNet uses a form of artificial intelligence called deep learning (also used in Google's Smart Reply automatic email system and in Apple's Siri) to develop ways to process data and find patterns on its own. "While deep-learning has propelled much progress in object recognition and scene understanding, predicting human memory has often been viewed as a higher-level cognitive process that computer scientists will never be able to tackle," principal research scientist Aude Oliva said. "Well we can, and we did!" 

To teach the algorithm what makes photos memorable, the researchers used the La Mem (large-scale image memorability) database of over 60,000 images that had been previously given "memorability scores" based on how well humans remembered them in trial experiments conducted online. After MemNet was able to find patterns for itself, it was tested against human subjects. "It performed 30 percent better than existing algorithms and was within a few percentage points of the average human performance," the CSAIL researchers said of the algorithm, which also creates a heat map of each image to highlight the most memorable section.

Examples from the La Mem gallery with high memscores. // La Mem

The researchers hope that the technology will help reveal more about how and what people remember. "This sort of research gives us a better understanding of the visual information that people pay attention to," UC Berkley Associate Professor Alexei Efros said. "For marketers, movie-makers and other content creators, being able to model your mental state as you look at something is an exciting new direction to explore."

To see how memorable your photos are, try the LaMem demo site created by the team at MIT.

[h/t: Science Alert]

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GoPro Will Let You Trade in Your Old Digital Camera for One of Their Cool New Ones
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If your camera is aging, GoPro just gave you a great incentive to trade it in for a new model. The company has launched a buyback program that discounts its latest models if you send in your old camera, according to TechCrunch.

If you participate in the GoPro TradeUp program, the company will lop $50 off the price of the new GoPro HERO6 Black and $100 off the price of the Fusion, both released in late 2017. The offer applies to any digital camera—GoPro or not. Now might be a good time to offload that digital point-and-shoot you’ve been sitting on. (It does have to have an original retail value of at least $100.)

GoPro tried a similar initiative in 2017, giving customers 60 days to send in older GoPro models and get a discount on new models. Almost 12,000 customers answered the call. Now, the company is bringing it back with no end date, and the program will now accept any digital camera, whether GoPro-made it or not. “Dented, dinged, destroyed—no problem, we’ll take it,” the site promises.

If you’re already looking to get a new camera and want to dispose of your old one properly, this is a good way to do it. According to the company, “returned cameras will be recycled responsibly via zero landfill and recycling methods appropriate to material type.”

When you order one of the two available GoPro models through the TradeUp program, the company will direct you to dust off your old camera and send it in, with shipping costs covered. Once GoPro receives your old camera, it will send you the discounted new one.

With the discounts, a HERO6 Black would cost $350, and the 360°-shooting Fusion would cost $600.

[h/t TechCrunch]

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Gustav Klimt at 100: Painter. Photographer. Dress Maker.
Fine Art Images/Heritage Images/Getty Images
Fine Art Images/Heritage Images/Getty Images

Mental Floss has partnered with FOTO, a visual storytelling platform from Getty Images, to bring you articles featuring stunning images from Getty's archive.

The famously erotic, semi-psychedelic, sometimes gold-leafed paintings of bohemian artist Gustav Klimt once scandalized Austrian society. Today, of course, they’ve become museum-shop staples and dorm-room must-haves. The Austrian painter, who died 100 years ago, was known for his sensual portraits of women wearing shimmering, swirling dresses, but less so for the creative—and possibly romantic—partnership that brought the dresses to life.

MORE THAN COLLABORATORS?

 Gustav Klimt and Emilie Floege in a dress with floral pattern in the garden of the Oleander villa in Kammer at the Attersee lake.
Imagno/Getty Images

The dresses now so closely associated with Klimt's work were a collaboration with Emilie Louise Flöge, a Vienna native Klimt met when she was just 18. Until Klimt's death in 1918, Emilie remained a close companion and perhaps a lover, and was a groundbreaking fashion designer with a radical streak in her own right. (Pictured: Emilie and Klimt in 1910.)

THE SISTERS FLÖGE

Emilie, Helene und Pauline Floege sitting in a rowboat with Gustav Klimt.
Imagno/Getty Images

Klimt met Emilie after his brother married her sister—and then promptly died. Klimt was left to care for the widow, which allowed him to spend plenty of time with the family Flöge and young Emilie. (Pictured: The three Flöge sisters, with Emilie at the far left, and Klimt in a rowboat in 1910.)

HUMBLE BEGINNINGS

Emilie Louise Floege (Floge) by Gustav Klimt
Leemage/Corbis, Getty Images

Emilie began her climb in the fashion world by working as a seamstress at her sister’s dressmaking school in Vienna. In 1899, the sisters won a dressmaking competition and went on to design a dress for a widely attended exhibition. (Pictured: Emilie, as painted by Klimt in 1902.)

DESIGNING WOMAN

Emilie Floege wearing a dress
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Emilie, presumably in a dress of her own design, in about 1910.

UP THE FASHION LADDER

Emilie Floege In A Reform Dress Designed By Eduard Josef Wimmer-Wisgrill.
ÖNB/Imagno/Getty Images

Emilie quickly established herself as a savvy businesswoman, opening Flöge Sisters, a haute couture fashion salon in Vienna. She traveled to Paris and London, studying the work of designers like Coco Chanel and Christian Dior, among others.

WORKING TOGETHER

Hope, II by Gustav Klimt
VCG Wilson, Corbis, Getty Images

Many of the dresses that appear in Klimt's most celebrated works were created in concert with Emilie: He designed the patterns, she the fabric and cuts.

KLIMT BEHIND THE CAMERA

Emilie Floege In A Reform Dress.
Imagno/Getty Images

Klimt took many photographs of these collaborations. Emilie's designs were influenced by the early Feminist movement: They were flowing, comfortable clothes for women (no corsets!) that hung loosely from the shoulders. In this picture by Klimt from 1906, Emilie wears a dress she designed.

CLASSIC IMAGES

Emilie Floege in a reform dress.
Imagno/Getty Images

Even with referrals from Klimt, who was at this point painting portraits of Vienna's high-society women, sales of Emilie's revolutionary fashions were not brisk. Here, Emilie as photographed by Klimt in 1906 or 1907.

SKY-HIGH SALES

Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer II
Imagno/Getty Images

Klimt was quite successful, but no one could have predicted how sought-after his works would eventually become. "Adele Bloch-Bauer II," pictured above and one of Klimt's most famous paintings, was a portrait of the wife of a wealthy Klimt patron. The Nazis snatched it from the family home during WWII but in 2006, the work was purchased at auction for nearly $88 million. The buyer? Oprah Winfrey, who eventually sold it for a reported $150 million.

For more Klimt photos, visit FOTO.

See Also...
Paris Museum Lets You Stand Inside Your Favorite Paintings
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Mesmerizing Murmurations
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Picasso: Memorable Quotes from a Master of Modern Art

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