CLOSE
Original image
YouTube

12 Seductive Facts About The Graduate

Original image
YouTube

Hello, The Graduate, our old friend. We’ve come to look at you again. The seminal 1967 satire helped usher in the “New Hollywood” era of moviemaking and turned an unknown actor named Dustin Hoffman into a star. It provided hotshot director Mike Nichols his first and only Oscar. It gave us “Mrs. Robinson” as a new slang term and reminded us of the importance of plastics. Here, while you’re sitting at the bottom of the pool in your scuba gear, read these behind-the-scenes details. 

1. DUSTIN HOFFMAN HAD TO DROP OUT OF THE PRODUCERS TO STAR IN IT.

The young actor, who’d worked steadily in theater and TV throughout the 1960s but hadn’t had a major film role yet, was set to appear as Nazi playwright Franz Liebkind in Mel Brooks’ first movie when The Graduate came along. Brooks didn’t blame Hoffman one bit for taking the bigger opportunity—especially since Brooks’s wife, Anne Bancroft, was already cast as Mrs. Robinson.

2. IN REAL LIFE, THERE WAS ONLY A SIX-YEAR AGE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN BENJAMIN AND MRS. ROBINSON.

What everyone remembers about The Graduate is that Benjamin is seduced by his parents’s middle-aged friend. “Mrs. Robinson” even became a slang term for a sexually aggressive older woman, what we today might call a “cougar.” But Bancroft was only 35 when the film was shot, and Hoffman was 29. Mike Nichols used lighting and makeup to give Bancroft an older look.

3. THE ADULTS ONLY HAVE LAST NAMES.

Even after they’ve begun sleeping together, Benjamin never calls Mrs. Robinson anything other than “Mrs. Robinson.” We never learn what her first name is—nor the first name of any other adult in the movie. Only Benjamin and his peers have first names, underscoring the generation gap at the heart of the movie. 

4. THAT’S NOT A CHRIST REFERENCE AT THE END.

It may look like crucifixion imagery when Benjamin shows up to stop Elaine’s wedding and spreads his arms out across the church window, but there was actually a more practical reason for it. As Hoffman later explained, the idea was that Benjamin would be pounding his fists against the glass to get Elaine’s attention. But the minister of the church where they were filming was keeping a close eye on things, so pounding was out of the question. Instead, Hoffman spread his arms out against the window, suggesting urgency without doing any damage.

5. THE DIRECTOR HIJACKED AN UNRELATED PAUL SIMON SONG AND TURNED IT INTO THE MOVIE’S SIGNATURE TUNE.

Paul Simon had been contracted to write three new songs for The Graduate but had only produced one by the time editing was nearly done. Mike Nichols later recounted how he pestered Simon for more, anything, and Simon said he had a new number he was working on, but not for the movie. “It’s a song about times past—about Mrs. Roosevelt and Joe DiMaggio and stuff,” Simon said. Nichols replied, “It’s now about Mrs. Robinson, not Mrs. Roosevelt.” And the rest is history. 

6. GENE HACKMAN WAS FIRED FROM THE FILM.

Hackman had been hired to play Mrs. Robinson’s husband, but three weeks into rehearsal, Mike Nichols realized something: Hackman was too young. He was actually a year older than Anne Bancroft, who was playing his wife, but for whatever reason it wasn’t working. He and Nichols parted ways amiably, and Murray Hamilton took over the part. 

7. NOBODY, INCLUDING DUSTIN HOFFMAN, THOUGHT DUSTIN HOFFMAN SHOULD STAR IN IT.

The obvious choice for the role of Benjamin Braddock—a privileged Beverly Hills kid with wealthy parents—was someone tan, handsome, white, Anglo-Saxon, and Protestant. Robert Redford was everyone’s first choice, but Nichols vetoed him on the grounds that the audience wouldn’t believe him as a character who has been rejected by women. Nichols auditioned hundreds of actors for the part. After seeing Hoffman’s audition, Nichols realized the key to the character should be that he’s out of place. He’s surrounded by tall, beautiful blond people, but he’s none of those things. Hoffman thought his audition had been terrible, but Nichols hired him, against the advice of the producers and financiers.

8. THAT FAMOUS POSTER USED A STUNT LEG.


The iconic image of Benjamin looking at Mrs. Robinson’s leg stretched across the frame does not feature the actual leg of Anne Bancroft. It’s Linda Gray, then an unknown model. (She said she was paid $25.) Gray went on to play Sue Ellen Ewing on Dallas, and later starred in West End and Broadway productions of—wait for it—The Graduate. As Mrs. Robinson. 

9. THE AUTHOR PATTERNED BENJAMIN AFTER HIMSELF, RIGHT DOWN TO HIS DISTASTE FOR HIS PARENTS’ WEALTH.

Charles Webb, the son of a successful San Francisco doctor, published The Graduate in 1963. He said Ben and Elaine were modeled after himself and his wife (there was no real-life Mrs. Robinson, though), and that included his anti-materialism attitude. He sold the movie rights to The Graduate for $20,000 (a pittance considering how valuable it later became), gave most of his royalties to charity, and turned down an inheritance from his father. 

10. ONLY ONE OF THE TWO CREDITED SCREENWRITERS ACTUALLY WROTE THE MOVIE.

After producer Lawrence Turman had secured Mike Nichols to direct the film, he sent the novel to a screenwriter named William Hanley to take a crack at adapting it. Hanley’s draft was “horrible,” Nichols said, so they gave it to another writer, Calder Willingham, “who also turned in a script that I just wasn’t crazy about.” Nichols’ friend Buck Henry ended up writing the version that made it to the screen, but Henry had to share credit with Willingham. “The Writers Guild said that Willingham deserved partial credit,” Nichols said, “but to tell the truth, I didn’t use any of his script. It’s all Buck’s work.” 

11. IT COULD HAVE STARRED THE BOY WONDER!

Burt Ward, then becoming very famous as the Caped Crusader’s sidekick in TV’s Batman, was offered the lead role by producer Turman. But Ward’s bosses nixed it. Ward said, “Because Batman was so enormous and successful ... they didn’t want to dilute anything to do with the character by having me play a different role. The studio wouldn’t let me do it.” 

12. IT COULD HAVE STARRED ABOUT A MILLION OTHER PEOPLE, TOO.

Besides Redford and Ward, many other actors were considered for Benjamin, including Charles Grodin, who came very close to being cast before dropping out over money and scheduling. Elaine, eventually played by Katharine Ross, was supposed to be Candice Bergen, with Natalie Wood, Ann-Margret, and Jane Fonda on the wish list, too. Nichols’ top choice for Benjamin’s father (William Daniels) was Ronald Reagan, who was just then going into politics. Doris Day turned down Mrs. Robinson because the book was too dirty (according to one telling, her husband-slash-manager didn’t even show it to her). And when Nichols visited Ava Gardner, who’d expressed interest in playing Mrs. Robinson, she acted like a nutty movie star. She declared, unasked, that she wouldn’t take off her clothes, and said she’d been trying all day to place a phone call to Ernest Hemingway, who really was a friend of hers but who’d been dead for five years.

Original image
Netflix
arrow
entertainment
5 Things We Know About Stranger Things Season 2
Original image
Netflix

Stranger Things seemed to come out of nowhere to become one of television's standout new series in 2016. Netflix's sometimes scary, sometimes funny, and always exciting homage to '80s pop culture was a binge-worthy phenomenon when it debuted in July 2016. Of course, the streaming giant wasn't going to wait long to bring more Stranger Things to audiences, and a second season was announced a little over a month after its debut—and Netflix just announced that we'll be getting it a few days earlier than expected. Here are five key things we know about the show's sophomore season, which kicks off on October 27.

1. WE'LL BE GETTING EVEN MORE EPISODES.

The first season of Stranger Things consisted of eight hour-long episodes, which proved to be a solid length for the story Matt and Ross Duffer wanted to tell. While season two won't increase in length dramatically, we will be getting at least one extra hour when the show returns in 2017 with nine episodes. Not much is known about any of these episodes, but we do know the titles:

"Madmax"
"The Boy Who Came Back To Life"
"The Pumpkin Patch"
"The Palace"
"The Storm"
"The Pollywog"
"The Secret Cabin"
"The Brain"
"The Lost Brother"

There's a lot of speculation about what each title means and, as usual with Stranger Things, there's probably a reason for each one.

2. THE KIDS ARE RETURNING (INCLUDING ELEVEN).

Stranger Things fans should gear up for plenty of new developments in season two, but that doesn't mean your favorite characters aren't returning. A November 4 photo sent out by the show's Twitter account revealed most of the kids from the first season will be back in 2017, including the enigmatic Eleven, played by Millie Bobby Brown (the #elevenisback hashtag used by series regular Finn Wolfhard should really drive the point home):

3. THE SHOW'S 1984 SETTING WILL LEAD TO A DARKER TONE.

A year will have passed between the first and second seasons of the show, allowing the Duffer brothers to catch up with a familiar cast of characters that has matured since we last saw them. With the story taking place in 1984, the brothers are looking at the pop culture zeitgeist at the time for inspiration—most notably the darker tone of blockbusters like Gremlins and Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom.

"I actually really love Temple of Doom, I love that it gets a little darker and weirder from Raiders, I like that it feels very different than Raiders did," Matt Duffer told IGN. "Even though it was probably slammed at the time—obviously now people look back on it fondly, but it messed up a lot of kids, and I love that about that film—that it really traumatized some children. Not saying that we want to traumatize children, just that we want to get a little darker and weirder."

4. IT'S NOT SO MUCH A CONTINUATION AS IT IS A SEQUEL.

When you watch something like The Americans season two, it's almost impossible to catch on unless you've seen the previous episodes. Stranger Things season two will differ from the modern TV approach by being more of a sequel than a continuation of the first year. That means a more self-contained plot that doesn't leave viewers hanging at the end of nine episodes.

"There are lingering questions, but the idea with Season 2 is there's a new tension and the goal is can the characters resolve that tension by the end," Ross Duffer told IGN. "So it's going to be its own sort of complete little movie, very much in the way that Season 1 is."

Don't worry about the two seasons of Stranger Things being too similar or too different from the original, though, because when speaking with Entertainment Weekly about the influences on the show, Matt Duffer said, "I guess a lot of this is James Cameron. But he’s brilliant. And I think one of the reasons his sequels are as successful as they are is he makes them feel very different without losing what we loved about the original. So I think we kinda looked to him and what he does and tried to capture a little bit of the magic of his work.”

5. THE PREMIERE WILL TRAVEL OUTSIDE OF HAWKINS.

Everything about the new Stranger Things episodes will be kept secret until they finally debut later this year, but we do know one thing about the premiere: It won't take place entirely in the familiar town of Hawkins, Indiana. “We will venture a little bit outside of Hawkins,” Matt Duffer told Entertainment Weekly. “I will say the opening scene [of the premiere] does not take place in Hawkins.”

So, should we take "a little bit outside" as literally as it sounds? You certainly can, but in that same interview, the brothers also said they're both eager to explore the Upside Down, the alternate dimension from the first season. Whether the season kicks off just a few miles away, or a few worlds away, you'll get your answer when Stranger Things's second season debuts next month.

Original image
NBC - © 2012 NBCUniversal Media, LLC
arrow
entertainment
Everything That’s Leaving Netflix in October
Original image
NBC - © 2012 NBCUniversal Media, LLC

Netflix subscribers are already counting down the days until the premiere of the new season of Stranger Things. But, as always, in order to make room for the near-90 new titles making their way to the streaming site, some of your favorite titles—including all of 30 Rock, The Wonder Years, and Malcolm in the Middle—must go. Here’s everything that’s leaving Netflix in October ... binge ‘em while you can!

October 1

30 Rock (Seasons 1-7)

A Love in Times of Selfies

Across the Universe

Barton Fink

Bella

Big Daddy

Carousel

Cradle 2 the Grave

Crafting a Nation

Curious George: A Halloween Boo Fest

Daddy’s Little Girls

Dark Was the Night

David Attenborough’s Rise of the Animals: Triumph of the Vertebrates (Season 1)

Day of the Kamikaze

Death Beach

Dowry Law

Dr. Dolittle: Tail to the Chief

Friday Night Lights (Seasons 1-5)

Happy Feet

Heaven Knows, Mr. Allison

Hellboy

Kagemusha

Laura

Love Actually

Malcolm in the Middle (Seasons 1-7)

Max Dugan Returns

Millennium 

Million Dollar Baby

Mortal Combat

Mr. 3000

Mulholland Dr.

My Father the Hero

My Name Is Earl (Seasons 1-4)

One Tree Hill (Seasons 1-9)

Patton

Picture This

Prison Break (Seasons 1-4)

The Bernie Mac Show (Seasons 1-5)

The Shining

The Wonder Years (Seasons 1-6)

Titanic

October 19

The Cleveland Show (Seasons 1-4)

October 21

Bones (Seasons 5-11)

October 27

Lie to Me (Seasons 2-3)

Louie (Seasons 1-5)

Hot Transylvania 2

October 29

Family Guy (Seasons 9-14)

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER
More from mental floss studios