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A Collection of the World's Most Hideous Public Transit Seats

There's something about public transportation that inspires wild—and often grotesque—designs. Airports tend to have such gaudy carpets that there is an entire website dedicated to these miserable patterns. But carpets are not the only medium for hideous design: Seats on buses, subways, and airplanes also fall victim to unseemly patterns. Sitzmuster des Todes (“Seating Pattern of Death”) is a German website dedicated to ugly transit seating from around the world.

Global travelers are welcome to submit photos of offensive seating to their Facebook page. There's also a “Hall of Death” featuring some of the most hideous designs the curators have ever seen. The designs—mostly things that look like a '90s computer puked up—are not for the faint of heart.

The organization says that they “have nothing against public transport” but hope that one day their children can board public transit “without having to constantly vomit.” At the very least, seats should not have eyeball patterned cushions.

Augen auf, denn das, ihr Lieben, ist die Zukunft der Sitzmuster. Heisser Scheiss direkt und investigativ von der...

Posted by Sitzmuster des Todes on Tuesday, September 30, 2014

STRAIGHTOUTTAKOTZTÜTE(Ein echter Stöcker. Danke René)

Posted by Sitzmuster des Todes on Monday, August 17, 2015

Da ist Stoff dran, aber es macht keinen Sinn. Also ganz wie das neue Playboy-Konzept. Unser Kotz-Stöffchen des Tages aus LA. (Danke Jonas)

Posted by Sitzmuster des Todes on Thursday, October 15, 2015

Solche Sachen manchen uns fast trauriger als die Brustverkleinerung von Scarlett Johansson. Wer möchte sich auf ein Ding...

Posted by Sitzmuster des Todes on Friday, January 16, 2015

Pacman und seine Crew vertreiben im Skibus in Mayrhofen ambitionierten Wintersportlern die letzten Ambitionen,...

Posted by Sitzmuster des Todes on Friday, January 24, 2014

[h/t: CityLab]

Header images courtesy of Frederick Dennstedt, Flickr // CC BY-SA 2.0

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Courtesy Umbrellium
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Design
These LED Crosswalks Adapt to Whoever Is Crossing
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Courtesy Umbrellium

Crosswalks are an often-neglected part of urban design; they’re usually just white stripes on dark asphalt. But recently, they’re getting more exciting—and safer—makeovers. In the Netherlands, there is a glow-in-the-dark crosswalk. In western India, there is a 3D crosswalk. And now, in London, there’s an interactive LED crosswalk that changes its configuration based on the situation, as Fast Company reports.

Created by the London-based design studio Umbrellium, the Starling Crossing (short for the much more tongue-twisting STigmergic Adaptive Responsive LearnING Crossing) changes its layout, size, configuration, and other design factors based on who’s waiting to cross and where they’re going.

“The Starling Crossing is a pedestrian crossing, built on today’s technology, that puts people first, enabling them to cross safely the way they want to cross, rather than one that tells them they can only cross in one place or a fixed way,” the company writes. That means that the system—which relies on cameras and artificial intelligence to monitor both pedestrian and vehicle traffic—adapts based on road conditions and where it thinks a pedestrian is going to go.

Starling Crossing - overview from Umbrellium on Vimeo.

If a bike is coming down the street, for example, it will project a place for the cyclist to wait for the light in the crosswalk. If the person is veering left like they’re going to cross diagonally, it will move the light-up crosswalk that way. During rush hour, when there are more pedestrians trying to get across the street, it will widen to accommodate them. It can also detect wet or dark conditions, making the crosswalk path wider to give pedestrians more of a buffer zone. Though the neural network can calculate people’s trajectories and velocity, it can also trigger a pattern of warning lights to alert people that they’re about to walk right into an oncoming bike or other unexpected hazard.

All this is to say that the system adapts to the reality of the road and traffic patterns, rather than forcing pedestrians to stay within the confines of a crosswalk system that was designed for car traffic.

The prototype is currently installed on a TV studio set in London, not a real road, and it still has plenty of safety testing to go through before it will appear on a road near you. But hopefully this is the kind of road infrastructure we’ll soon be able to see out in the real world.

[h/t Fast Company]

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iStock
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fun
Here's How to Turn an IKEA Box Into a Spaceship
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iStock

Since IKEA boxes are designed to contain entire furniture items, they could probably fit a small child once they’re emptied of any flat-packed component pieces. This means they have great potential as makeshift forts—or even as play spaceships, according to one of the Swedish furniture brand’s print ads, which was spotted by Design Taxi.

First highlighted by Ads of the World, the advertisement—which was created by Miami Ad School, New York—shows that IKEA is helping customers transform used boxes into build-it-yourself “SPÄCE SHIPS” for children. The company provides play kits, which come with both an instruction manual and cardboard "tools" for tiny builders to wield during the construction process.

As for the furniture boxes themselves, they're emblazoned with the words “You see a box, they see a spaceship." As if you won't be climbing into the completed product along with the kids …

Check out the ad below:

[h/t Design Taxi]

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