13 Spirited Facts About How the Grinch Stole Christmas

Warner Home Video
Warner Home Video

Each year, millions of Americans welcome the holiday season by tuning into their favorite TV specials. For most people, this includes at least one viewing of the 1966 animated classic How the Grinch Stole Christmas. Adapted from Dr. Seuss’s equally famous children’s book by legendary animator Chuck Jones, How the Grinch Stole Christmas first aired more than 50 years ago, on December 18, 1966. Here are 13 facts about the TV special that will surely makes your heart grow three sizes this holiday season.

1. THEODOR “DR. SEUSS” GEISEL AND CHUCK JONES PREVIOUSLY WORKED TOGETHER ON ARMY TRAINING VIDEOS.

During World War II, Geisel joined the United States Army Air Forces and served as commander of the Animation Department for the First Motion Picture Unit, a unit tasked with creating various training and pro-war propaganda films. It was here that Geisel soon found himself working closely with Chuck Jones on an instructional cartoon called Private Snafu. Originally classified as for-military-personnel-only, Private Snafu featured a bumbling protagonist who helped illustrate the dos and don’ts of Army safety and security protocols.

2. IT WAS BECAUSE OF THEIR PREVIOUS WORKING RELATIONSHIP THAT GEISEL AGREED TO HAND OVER THE RIGHTS TO THE GRINCH TO JONES.

After several unpleasant encounters in relation to his previous film work—including the removal of his name from credits and instances of pirated redistribution—Geisel became notoriously “anti-Hollywood.” Because of this, he was reluctant to sell the rights to How the Grinch Stole Christmas. However, when Jones personally approached him about making an adaptation, Geisel relented, knowing he could trust Jones and his vision.

3. EVEN WITH GEISEL’S APPROVAL, THE SPECIAL ALMOST DIDN’T HAPPEN.

Ted Geisel, American writer and cartoonist, at work on a drawing of the grinch for "How the Grinch Stole Christmas"
By Al Ravenna, World Telegram staff photographer - Library of Congress. New York World-Telegram & Sun Collection. Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons

Whereas today’s studios and production companies provide funding for projects of interest, television specials of the past, like A Charlie Brown Christmas and How the Grinch Stole Christmas, had to rely on company sponsorship in order to get made. While A Charlie Brown Christmas found its financier in the form of Coca-Cola, How the Grinch Stole Christmas struggled to find a benefactor. With storyboards in hand, Jones pitched the story to more than two dozen potential sponsors—breakfast foods, candy companies, and the like—all without any luck. Down to the wire, Jones finally found his sponsor in an unlikely source: the Foundation for Commercial Banks. “I thought that was very odd, because one of the great lines in there is that the Grinch says, ‘Perhaps Christmas doesn’t come from a store,’” Jones said of the surprise endorsement. “I never thought of a banker endorsing that kind of a line. But they overlooked it, so we went ahead and made the picture.”

4. ITS BUDGET WAS MASSIVE.

Coming in at over $300,000, or $2.2 million in today’s dollars, the special’s budget was unheard of at the time for a 26-minute cartoon adaptation. For comparison’s sake, A Charlie Brown Christmas’s budget was reported as $96,000, or roughly $722,000 today (and this was after production had gone $20,000 over the original budget).

5. GEISEL WROTE THE LYRICS FOR THE SPECIAL.

No one had a way with words quite like Dr. Seuss, so Jones felt that Geisel should provide the lyrics to the songs featured in How the Grinch Stole Christmas.

6. FANS REQUESTED TRANSLATIONS OF THE “FAHOO FORAZE” SONG.

True to his persona’s tongue-twisting trickery, Geisel mimicked sounds of classical Latin in his nonsensical lyrics. After the special aired, viewers wrote to the network requesting translations of the song as they were convinced that the lyrics were, in fact, real Latin phrases.

7. THURL RAVENSCROFT DIDN’T RECEIVE CREDIT FOR HIS SINGING OF  “YOU’RE A MEAN ONE, MR. GRINCH.”

The famous voice actor and singer, best known for providing the voice of Kellogg’s Tony the Tiger, wasn’t recognized for his work in How the Grinch Stole Christmas. Because of this, most viewers wrongly assumed that the narrator of the special, Boris Karloff, also sang the piece in question. Upset by this oversight, Geisel personally apologized to Ravenscroft and vowed to make amends. Geisel went on to pen a letter, urging all the major columnists that he knew to help him rectify the mistake by issuing a notice of correction in their publications.

8. CHUCK JONES HAD TO FIND WAYS TO FILL OUT THE 26-MINUTE TIME SLOT.

Because reading the book out loud only takes about 12 minutes, Jones was faced with the challenge of extending the story. For this, he turned to Max the dog. “That whole center section where Max is tied up to the sleigh, and goes down through the mountainside, and has all those problems getting down there, was good comic business as it turns out,” Jones explained in TNT’s How the Grinch Stole Christmas special, which is a special feature on the movie’s DVD. “But it was all added; it was not part of the book.” Jones would go on to name Max as his favorite character from the special, as he felt that he directly represented the audience.

9. THE GREEN COLORING OF THE GRINCH WAS INSPIRED BY A RENTAL CAR.

How the Grinch Stole Christmas! (1966)
Warner Home Video

In the original book, the Grinch is illustrated as black and white, with hints of pink and red. Rumor has it that Jones was inspired to give the Grinch his iconic coloring after he rented a car that was painted an ugly shade of green.

10. GEISEL THOUGH THE GRINCH LOOKED LIKE JONES.

When Geisel first saw Jones’s drawings of the Grinch, he exclaimed, “That doesn’t look like the Grinch, that looks like you!” Jones’s response, according to TNT’s How the Grinch Stole Christmas Special: “Well, it happens.”

11. AT ONE POINT, THE SPECIAL RECEIVED A “CENSORED” EDIT.

Over the years, How the Grinch Stole Christmas has been edited in order to shorten its running time (in order to allow for more commercials). However, one edit—which ran for several years—censored the line “You’re a rotter, Mr. Grinch” from the song “You’re a Mean One, Mr. Grinch.” Additionally, the shot in which the Grinch smiles creepily just before approaching the bed filled with young Whos was deemed inappropriate for certain networks and was removed.

12. THE SPECIAL’S SUCCESS LED TO BOTH A PREQUEL AND A CROSSOVER SPECIAL.

Given the popularity of the Christmas special, two more Grinch tales were produced: Halloween is Grinch Night and The Grinch Grinches The Cat in the Hat. Airing on October 29, 1977, Halloween is Grinch Night tells the story of the Grinch making his way down to Whoville to scare all the Whos on Halloween. In The Grinch Grinches The Cat in the Hat, which aired on May 20, 1982, the Grinch finds himself wanting to renew his mean spirit by picking on the Cat in the Hat. Unlike the original, neither special was deemed a classic. But this is not to say they weren’t well-received; in fact, both went on to win Emmy Awards.

13. BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH IS HOLLYWOOD'S NEWEST GRINCH.

Illumination Entertainment—the company behind Horton Hears a Who, The Lorax, and Minions—has just released The Grinch, which Deadline originally described as a "newly imagined" 3D computer-animated take on How the Grinch Stole Christmas. Co-directed by animation veteran Yarrow Cheney (The Secret Life of Pets) and longtime Kevin Smith producer Scott Mosier, the film puts Oscar-nominated actor Benedict Cumberbatch in the title role. The Grinch is in theaters now.

Watch One Second From Every Game of Thrones Episode in Under Two Minutes

Helen Sloan/HBO
Helen Sloan/HBO

Game of Thrones aired its final episode on May 19, and despite some harsh reviews, many fans are finding it hard to accept the show’s end. While some consider Thrones counseling or rewatching the series with a tissue box handy, others on the internet are creating really cool montage videos.

Twitter user Andy Kelly recently posted a fan-made video of one-second clips from all 73 Game of Thrones episodes. The video shows the most memorable scenes from the series, such as Ned Stark’s decapitation, the Red Wedding, King Joffrey being poisoned, Jon Snow’s resurrection, the killing of the Night King, and Daenerys Targaryen’s death.

You really can’t capture all of the action-packed events and shocking twists that happened within the eight seasons of Game of Thrones so quickly, but the video does a good job of giving encapsulating it in under two minutes. And it’s easier than binge-watching it again.

[h/t ScreenRant]

Jimmy Kimmel Shows Us What a Game of Thrones/Full House Mashup Would Look Like

Two of the least-similar shows in television history just came together … in a parody courtesy of Jimmy Kimmel Live. The hilarious video depicts a hypothetical Game of Thrones spinoff series where Jaime Lannister joins two classic characters from Full House for a show appropriately titled Full House Lannister.

While there is at least one Thrones spinoff already in the works, Kimmel couldn’t wait for the series to premiere, so he made his own to deal with the post-Thrones blues.

The video starts off in typical Full House fashion with Joey (Dave Coulier) trying to open a pickle jar, which Jaime (Nikolaj Coster-Waldau) stabs with his sword and destroys. After a few pun-filled jokes, Jaime gets upset and Danny (Bob Saget) sits down with him to talk. Jaime explains that he had a fight with his sister, but when he reveals it’s because he got Cersei pregnant again, a creeped out Danny flees the situation. Joey then comes over to seemingly console Jaime, but instead hilariously says, “I was just going to tell you to stop f***ing your sister.”

The parody perfectly combines the silliness of Full House and the darker topics of Game of Thrones—and the cherry on top is a shadow of a dragon flying over San Francisco in the credits.

[h/t: ScreenRant]

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