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Here's How to Avoid All Star Wars Spoilers This Week

Star Wars: The Force Awakens premiered this week in Los Angeles and opens nationwide on December 18, but not everyone can see it at the same time. Spoiler culture is at its peak, not only on social media sites like Twitter and Facebook, but in bold headlines of news outlets that want to break stories first. Unplugging from the Internet for days until you can see the film is less than ideal, but out of Google Chrome comes a new hope.

The Force Block Chrome extension claims to block spoilers for the film with something called "smart pattern detection and a whitelist for false alarms." According to The Verge, the extension is more of an all-encompassing filter that sends a warning message with a clever film reference for any site that mentions the film (so if you already have it installed, you probably can't see this post). When we tested the extension at mental_floss, Facebook and Twitter went unblocked. As did StarWars.com and NYTimes.com, but StarWars.com/news and the Arts section of The New York Times each resulted in spoiler warnings. The whitelist feature allows users to mark any site as safe and proceed to the desired online content.

Judging the effectiveness of the blocker by visiting a handful of sites is by no means a full review, so go check it out for yourself.

Chrome browser screenshot using the Force Block extension


Chrome browser screenshot using the Force Block extension

[h/t The Verge

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Star Wars © & TM 2015 Lucasfilm Ltd. All Rights Reserved.
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entertainment
Listen to What Darth Vader Sounded Like On the Star Wars Set
Star Wars © & TM 2015 Lucasfilm Ltd. All Rights Reserved.
Star Wars © & TM 2015 Lucasfilm Ltd. All Rights Reserved.

The voice of Darth Vader, provided by James Earl Jones, is one of the most iconic aspects of the original Star Wars movies. But James Earl Jones wasn't the actor wearing that outfit—it was British actor David Prowse, who was cast in part because he was huge (reportedly 6'5" and a former body-building champion).

George Lucas always intended to replace Prowse's voice, but it's still a bit of a shock to hear a muffled British voice coming out of Darth Vader's helmet. Here's video showing what Darth Vader sounded like on the set before James Earl Jones re-recorded the dialogue.

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Star Wars © & TM 2015 Lucasfilm Ltd. All Rights Reserved.
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Pop Culture
How to Perform the Star Wars Theme—On Calculators
Star Wars © & TM 2015 Lucasfilm Ltd. All Rights Reserved.
Star Wars © & TM 2015 Lucasfilm Ltd. All Rights Reserved.

The iconic Star Wars theme has been recreated with glass harps, theremins, and even cat meows. Now, Laughing Squid reports that the team over at YouTube channel It’s a small world have created a version that can be played on calculators.

The channel’s math-related music videos feature covers of popular songs like Luis Fonsi’s "Despacito," Ed Sheeran’s "Shape of You," and the Pirates of the Caribbean theme, all of which are performed on two or more calculators. The Star Wars theme, though, is played across five devices, positioned together into a makeshift keyboard of sorts.

The video begins with a math-musician who transcribes number combinations into notes. Then, they break into an elaborate practice chord sequence on two, and then four, calculators. Once they’re all warmed up, they begin playing the epic opening song we all know and love, which you can hear for yourself in all its electronic glory below.

[h/t Laughing Squid]

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