Sotheby's International Realty
Sotheby's International Realty

Julia Child’s French Vacation Home Is Up For Sale

Sotheby's International Realty
Sotheby's International Realty

It’s hard to think about Julia Child without picturing her idyllic life in France. If you’ve ever dreamed of living—and cooking—like the culinary legend in a cottage in the French countryside, now you can buy a vacation home owned by the woman herself. 

Julia Child’s La Pitchoune—meaning “The Little One” in Provençal—has just hit the open real estate market for the first time. Located on a hillside in the tiny village of Plascassier, the 1614-square-foot cottage is being sold through Sotheby’s International Realty for an asking price of 800,000 euros (about $880,000) according to The New York Times. It was constructed in 1963 to be used as a vacation home for part of each year by Julia and her husband, Paul Cushing Child. 

Though it had a major impact on her life, Julia’s full-time residency in France was brief. She lived there from 1948 to 1956, and when she left for America with her husband, they consoled themselves by dreaming of one day buying a home in France. The house they eventually built in Provence served as their link to the country for nearly 30 years. From the 1960s to the early 1990s, the couple made yearly visits to La Pitchoune, where Julia would entertain fellow culinary legends and cook with her cookbook collaborator and the property’s co-owner, Simone Beck. 

In light of Paul’s deteriorating health and Beck’s death in 1991, Julia gave up the property in 1992. The following year it was repurposed as a culinary school run by Julia’s friend and Beck’s former pupil, Kathie Alex. Alex was forced to close the school earlier this year due to health reasons, and now for the first time in its history the tiny home is hitting the real estate market. 

It offers all the features of a comfortable vacation home: a living room, three bedrooms, a shaded terrace, and a pool. But of all the rooms in the house, it’s the kitchen that will be attracting the most attention from potential homeowners. Designed by Paul Cushing Child himself, Julia’s kitchen was modeled after the one in their home in Cambridge, Massachusetts, which is currently being exhibited at the Smithsonian. The room is outfitted with extra tall counters customized to fit her six-foot-two stature, and peg-board walls still hung with her original equipment. The kitchen is the world's only remaining Julia Child kitchen located in a private house, making La Pitchoune an international treasure as well as a cozy country home. You can see more photos of the property below.

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Ben Leuner, AMC
You Can Cook (Food) With Bryan Cranston and Aaron Paul in the Original Breaking Bad RV
Ben Leuner, AMC
Ben Leuner, AMC

A new contest is giving Breaking Bad fans the chance to cook a meal with Walter White and Jesse Pinkman. A new charity fundraising campaign is sending one lucky fan and a friend out to Los Angeles to celebrate the 10th anniversary of Breaking Bad’s premiere with the stars themselves—Bryan Cranston, Aaron Paul, and that beat-up RV.

“That’s right, the real Walter White and Jesse Pinkman will join you in The Krystal Ship to whip up some delicious food, take tons of pictures, and bond over the most addicting show ever made,” the contest’s page on the charity fundraising site Omaze trumpets.

All you have to do to throw your (porkpie) hat in the ring is break out your wallet and donate to a good cause. Every dollar you donate to the contest through Omaze is basically a raffle ticket. And the more you donate, the better your odds are of winning. Each dollar donated equals 10 entries, so if you donate $10, you have 100 chances, if you donate $25, 250 chances, etc. At higher donation levels, you’ll also get guaranteed swag, including T-shirts, signed set photos by Cranston and Paul, props and scripts from the show, and more.

Technically, you can enter without donating, but don’t be a jerk—it’s for the kids. The proceeds from the contest will go to the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children and the Kind Campaign, an anti-bullying charity.

The contest winner will be announced around September 12, and the big event will take place on September 15.

Donate to win here. The contest ends at 11:59 p.m. PT on August 30.

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Evening Standard/Stringer, Getty Images
60 Years Later, a Lost Stanley Kubrick Script Has Been Found
Evening Standard/Stringer, Getty Images
Evening Standard/Stringer, Getty Images

A “lost” screenplay co-written by famed filmmaker Stanley Kubrick has been found after 60 years, Vulture reports.

The screenplay is an adaptation of Stefan Zweig’s novella Burning Secret, which Vulture describes as a reverse Lolita (plot summary for those who forgot high school English class: a man enters a relationship with a woman because of his obsession with her 12-year-old daughter). In Burning Secret, a man befriends an adolescent boy in order to seduce his mother. Zweig’s other works have inspired films like Wes Anderson's The Grand Budapest Hotel (which the director claims he "stole" from Zweig's novels Beware of Pity and The Post-Office Girl).

Kubrick’s screenplay adaptation is co-written by novelist Calder Willingham and dated October 24, 1956. Although the screenplay bears a stamp from MGM’s screenwriting department, Nathan Abrams—the Bangor University professor who discovered the script—thinks it’s likely the studio found it too risqué for mass audiences.

“The child acts as an unwitting go-between for his mother and her would-be lover, making for a disturbing story with sexuality and child abuse churning beneath its surface,” Abrams told The Guardian. It's worth noting, however, that Kubrick directed an adaptation of Vladimir Nabokov's Lolita in 1962, which MGM distributed, and it was also met with a fair share of controversy.

Abrams said the screenplay for Burning Secret is complete enough that it could be created by filmmakers today. He noted that the discovery is particularly exciting because it confirms speculations Kubrick scholars have had for decades.

“Kubrick aficionados knew he wanted to do it, [but] no one ever thought it was completed,” Abrams told The Guardian.

The Guardian reports that Abrams found the screenplay while researching his book Eyes Wide Shut: Stanley Kubrick and the Making of His Final Film. The screenplay is owned by the family of one of Kubrick’s colleagues.

[h/t Vulture]

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