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15 Tips and Tricks for a Stress-Free Holiday Season

Preparing a house for the holidays has the potential to be both time consuming and annoying. But with some Yuletide cheer and these tricks, setting up your home can be a stress-free affair.

1. MEASURE YOUR SPACE BEFORE YOU BUY A TREE.

Whether you're going real or fake, picking the right tree is one of the most important parts of the holiday season—and there's nothing worse than selecting a tree and bringing it home to find it doesn't fit in your space. So before you go out to the tree farm or Christmas tree store, measure your space (don't forget to factor in the height of your tree stand!). It's also not a bad idea to measure the door you want to squeeze the tree through.

Need tips for picking the right tree for you? Real trees should have a symmetrical shape that tapers up. Before you get it inside, prune any areas that are unruly or extend outwardly from the shape of the tree. Keep in mind that pine trees tend to have longer needles, and fir trees tend to have softer needles. If you have allergies, consider a spruce tree—its scent is less pungent and fragrant than pine or fir. You can also go artificial, in which case you'll want to make sure you bend the branches and fluff the tree to hide the spaces between each layer. Then light a pine-scented candle to make it smell like the real thing. 

2. BEFORE PUTTING YOUR TREE IN ITS STAND, CUT IT AROUND THE BASE.

Cut a 1/2-inch thick disk off the base of the tree trunk to make it easier for the tree to absorb water. Your tree stand should have a deep reservoir; once your tree is set up, fill it to the top. After that, add water daily so it doesn't dry out—you'll need about 1 quart of water per inch of the trunk in diameter.

3. MAKE ROOM FOR BIG PRESENTS BY ELEVATING YOUR CHRISTMAS TREE.

Trying to shove large presents under a low tree can be pretty frustrating, not to mention messy—so give your tree a boost. Place a few paint cans in a wide cardboard box to keep it sturdy, then place your tree on top. (You can also use a block of wood.) As an added bonus, your elevated tree appears larger than it really is and has a bigger presence in the room.

4. USE A PVC PIPE AND A FUNNEL TO GET WATER TO THE TREE.

An easy way to water your tree without getting gook or needles all over you is to place a 3- to 5-foot 3/4-inch PVC pipe into the reservoir with a 45-degree elbow connector and a funnel attached to its top. Then all you have to do to water the tree is pour water into the funnel, so it travels through the pipe into the reservoir.

5. TREE RESIN ON YOUR HANDS? USE HAND SANITIZER TO GET RID OF IT.

Let’s face it: Getting a real tree for Christmas is really messy. When you inevitably get tree sap on your hands and clothes, using soap and water to remove the sticky resin isn't the solution. Instead, trying using hand sanitizer. It contains alcohol, which will break up the resin on your skin in only a matter of seconds. If you don’t have hand sanitizer on hand, try cooking oil, peanut butter, or even toothpaste should also do the trick

6. USE A LINT ROLLER TO GET RID OF ERRANT PINE NEEDLES.

Regular watering of your tree will greatly reduce the number of pine needles that fall off it—but your tree will still shed, and those needles will end up everywhere. And even vacuums can't get every little needle.

One of the best ways to clean up loose pine needles from your furniture is using an over-sized lint roller. It might seem awkward, but it does the trick. If you’d rather stand while getting rid of the needles, consider buying a rubber broom, which works even on carpets: Use shorter strokes, which will build a static charge and help you pick up needles quickly. 

If there are still small pine needles hanging around, use a piece of duct tape (sticky side out) wrapped around your hand to dab needles off the floor.

7. KEEP FAKE TREES FROM TIPPING OVER WITH A BAG OF RICE.

If you’ve got an artificial Christmas tree this year, make sure you use a hefty weight around the base so it doesn’t tip over when you’re decorating (or after you're done). A 10 pound bag of rice on the back of the base of the tree should keep it sturdy; you can also use a few bricks to balance out the weight. 

8. TRIM YOUR TREE IN THE RIGHT ORDER.

Hanging and wrapping garland and tinsel should be the first thing you do after you set up your tree. Use a simple burlap garland or tinsel to fill out any shallow spots or holes. It’s also an easy way to spruce up your tree if you’re using an artificial one or you don’t have a lot of ornaments and other holiday decorations. For every foot of your tree, you should wrap about 9 feet of garland or tinsel around it.

Next, add lights. The best way to string lights on your Christmas tree is from the inside out; start at the base of the trunk and work your way up, wrapping the lights around every big branch and back until you get to the tip of the Christmas tree. For every foot-and-a-half of your tree, you should use about 100 lights (or more if they're particularly small). You can also use large and small sized lights around your Christmas tree to make it look fuller.

Then it's time to hang your ornaments. Make sure ahead of time that you have enough hooks for each ornament you use (or pick up some green florist’s wire, which blends in better than traditional hooks). If you have pets, use ribbons instead of hooks, so your cat or dog doesn’t get hurt if they play with the ornaments. (Also consider placing ornaments on higher branches so there’s less a risk of your pet knocking one over—or chewing on one.)

When placing ornaments around the tree, put heavier and larger ones on the sturdier inside branches, and the smaller ones on the outer tips. Lastly, place the topper at the very top once you are satisfied with your Christmas tree.

9. USE BREAD TO CLEAN UP BROKEN ORNAMENTS OR GLASS.

Whether you drop an ornament or your party guest drops a glass, don't reach for the vacuum—the glass can damage it. Instead, reach for the bread bag: After sweeping up the big pieces with a broom, you can easily clean up tiny shards with a slice of bread; just press the slice onto the floor where the glass was shattered, then toss it out.

10. REMOVE PACKAGING BEFORE WRAPPING GIFTS.

Ripping through wrapping paper is fun for kids. What's not fun for kids—or adults—is trying to get through the tape, zip ties, screws, and heavy plastic that surround their new toys. Valuable playtime is at stake, so give your kids a break by removing the toy from its packaging before you gift wrap it. Use a package opener tool to make quick work of the maddening manufacturer's packaging before placing the toy back into the outer box and then wrapping it. If a toy needs some assembly, take the toy out of its package and put it together before you wrap it with wrapping paper. Now when your kids open their gifts on Christmas Day, they can spend more time playing with their toys, and you can spend more time relaxing.

11. USE A TOILET PAPER ROLL TO HOLD WRAPPING PAPER.

The best way to secure and hold your wrapping paper in place for storage is to use an old toilet paper roll. Cut the tube longways down the middle to open it up. When you’re done wrapping, take the opened toilet paper roll and wrap it around your wrapping paper like a napkin ring. The wrapping paper will stay secure and not unroll when you store it.

If you have multiple rolls of wrapping paper leftover after the holidays, store it in an old waste paper basket or hang them in a garment bag until next year. It will keep them neat and tidy, instead of loose on the top shelf of your closet.

12. USE A PAPER TOWEL HOLDER FOR EASY ACCESS TO RIBBONS.

A paper towel holder can be used for more than just paper towels. Place a few spools of gift wrapping ribbon in a paper towel holder from largest to smallest from the bottom up. This is the quickest way to organize and dispense ribbons to finish off the perfect holiday gift.

13. STORE CHRISTMAS LIGHTS ON A HANGER.

Christmas lights are a pain to untangle every year. Instead of messing around with a rat’s nest, wrap your lights around a plastic coat hanger or cardboard paper towel roll. It will be easier to untangle and unwrap as you string them on a Christmas tree or window. Be sure to plug the ends into each other to keep your lights secure and tangle free.

14. USE COFFEE TINS OR EGG CARTONS TO STORE ORNAMENTS.

Instead of throwing ornaments in an old shoebox, place medium to large ornaments in an old coffee tin or cheap plastic drinking cups. Clean out an old coffee tin and gently place larger Christmas decorations wrapped in newspaper inside. For medium sized ornaments, store them in plastic drinking cups inside of a larger plastic storage bin. Use an empty egg carton to store smaller Christmas ornaments. This is a good way to keep ornaments tidy, compact, and easy to access next year.

15. SAVE TIME FOR NEXT YEAR BY WRAPPING YOUR FAKE TREE IN PLASTIC WRAP, ORNAMENTS AND ALL.

Taking down a Christmas tree is never as fun as putting it up, so if you’re using an artificial tree, simply wrap the entire Christmas tree with lights and decorations on it with plastic wrap. Once you’ve wrapped it around the tree a few times, store it in your basement or garage. When Christmas comes again the following year, it will be easier to set up and display for another holiday season.

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3 Reasons Why Your New Year's Resolutions Fail—and How to Fix Them
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You don’t need a special day to come up with goals, but New Year’s Day is as good a time as any to build better habits. The problem is, by the time February rolls around, our best laid plans have often gone awry. Don’t let it happen this year: Heed these three simple tips for fail-proof resolutions.

PROBLEM 1: THEY’RE TOO OVERWHELMING

Let’s say your goal is to pay off $5000 worth of credit card debt this year. Since you're giving yourself a long timeframe (all year) to pay it down, you end up procrastinating or splurging, telling yourself you’ll make up for it later. But the longer you push it off, the bigger and more overwhelming your once-reasonable goal can feel.

Solution: Set Smaller Milestones

The big picture is important, but connecting your goal to the present makes it more digestible and easier to stick with. Instead of vowing to pay off $5000 by the end of next December, make it your resolution to put $96 toward your credit card debt every week, for example.

In a study from the University of Wollongong, researchers asked subjects to save using one of two methods: a linear model and a cyclical model. In the linear model, the researchers told subjects that saving for the future was important and asked them to set aside money accordingly. In contrast, they told the cyclical group:

This approach acknowledges that one’s life consists of many small and large cycles, that is, events that repeat themselves. We want you to think of the personal savings task as one part of such a cyclical life. Make your savings task a routinized one: just focus on saving the amount that you want to save now, not next month, not next year. Think about whether you saved enough money during your last paycheck cycle. If you saved as much as you wanted, continue with your persistence. If you did not save enough, make it up this time, with the current paycheck cycle.

When subjects used this cyclical model, focusing on the present, they saved more than subjects who focused on their long-term goal.

PROBLEM 2: THEY'RE TOO VAGUE

“Find a better job” is a worthy goal, but it's a bit amorphous. It's unclear what "better" means to you, and it’s difficult to plot the right course of action when you’re not sure what your desired outcome is. Many resolutions are vague in this way: get in shape, worry less, spend more time with loved ones.

Solution: Make Your Goal a SMART One

To make your goal actionable, it should be SMART: specific, measurable, achievable, realistic, and time-bound. When you set specific parameters and guidelines for your goal, it makes it easier to come up with an action plan. Under a bit more scrutiny, "spend more time with loved ones" might become "invite my best friends over for dinner every other Sunday night." This new goal is specific, measurable, time-bound—it ticks all the boxes and tells you exactly what you want and how to get there.

PROBLEM 3: YOU FELL FOR THE “FALSE FIRST STEP”

“A false first step is when we try to buy a better version of ourselves instead of doing the actual work to accomplish it,” Anthony Ongaro of Break the Twitch tells Mental Floss. “The general idea is that purchasing something like a heart rate monitor can feel a lot like we're taking a step towards our fitness goals,” Ongaro says. “The purchase itself can give us a dopamine release and a feeling of satisfaction, but it hasn't actually accomplished anything other than spending some money on a new gadget.”

Even worse, sometimes that dopamine is enough to lure you away from your goal altogether, Ongaro says. “That feeling of satisfaction that comes with the purchase often is good enough that we don't feel the need to actually go out for a run and use it.”

Solution: Start With What You Already Have

You can avoid this trap by forcing yourself to start your goal with the resources you already have on hand. “Whether the goal is to learn a new language or improve physical fitness, the best way to get started and avoid the false first step is to do the best you can with what you already have,” Ongaro says. “Start really small, even learning one new word per day for 30 days straight, or just taking a quick walk around the block every day.”

This isn’t to say you should never buy anything related to your goal, though. As Ongaro points out, you just want to make sure you’ve already developed the habit a bit first. “Establish a habit and regular practice that will be enhanced by a product you may buy,” he says. “It's likely that you won't even need that gadget or that fancy language learning software once you actually get started ... Basically, don't let buying something be the first step you take towards meaningful change in your life.”

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7 Hangover Cures Backed By Science
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Science has a lot to say about bogus hangover cures (coffee, hair of the dog, and saunas aren't doing you any favors), but not as much about which treatments are legitimate. That's not for a lack of trying: The quest to banish the headaches, nausea, and dizziness that follow a bout of heavy drinking has been going on for centuries. We still don't know how to prevent hangovers or how exactly they happen, but if you're feeling miserable after last night, there are a handful of science-based remedies that might ease your pain.

1. ASIAN PEAR JUICE

Have some extra Asian pears at home? Run them through your juicer before your next night out. According to researchers at Australia's Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, just 7.4 ounces of Asian pear juice is enough to soften the blow of a hangover. The scientists say that the juice interacts with enzymes that break down alcohol, speeding up your metabolism and leaving less surplus alcohol for your body to absorb. There's just one catch: The juice must be consumed before you drink anything else in order to be effective. Apologies to anyone currently reading this through heavy-duty sunglasses.

2. MUSIC

Anyone who's ever suffered through a massive hangover knows that sound is the enemy. But while your roommate's 9 a.m. tap dancing practice might exacerbate your symptoms, music may have the opposite effect. Research has shown that listening to music can provide relief to migraines, which are similar to hangover headaches. As long as the music is pleasant and suits your taste, it should help to drown out the chorus of pain playing in your mind. Head sensitivity isn't the only symptom music helps with: According to researchers at the University of Edinburgh, listening to your favorite music also eases pain. There hasn't been research specifically on hangovers, but at the very least it should hide your pained cries.

3. SPRITE

If you're looking for something to nurse your hangover, skip the bloody Mary. A team of Chinese researchers found that Xue bi, the Chinese version of Sprite, is actually the best beverage to combat the lingering side-effects of alcohol. Of the 57 drinks tested, Sprite was the best at helping enzymes break down acetaldehyde, the metabolized version of ethanol that's blamed for some of the nastiest hangover symptoms. The scientists also identified which concoctions you should avoid: A drink containing herbs and hemp seeds was the worst offender, as it actually prolongs acetaldehyde metabolism instead of speeding it up. (We should also caution that this test was done in a lab and might not be applicable to actual drinking scenarios.)

4. PEDIALYTE

Although not the primary cause of your hangover, one of the many ways alcohol can leave you feeling worse for wear the morning after is dehydration. Alcohol is a diuretic—it makes you pee a lot more than you would otherwise. If your fluids are depleted when you go to bed, you can expect to wake up feeling groggy, achy, and all-around not your best. Water is the simplest fix for dehydration, but for more extreme cases, there's Pedialyte. The drink was originally developed to rehydrate kids sick from vomiting and diarrhea, but it's marketed as a hangover treatment for adults as well. It contains nutrients, sodium, and other electrolytes—all things that can nurture your body when it's dehydrated. It won't cure the hangover, but it might help alleviate the worst of it.

5. ANTI-INFLAMMATORY DRUGS

If your first move when you're hungover is to reach for a bottle of aspirin, you have the right idea. Anti-inflammatory drugs may not do much to stop the underlying causes of your condition, but they can suppress your symptoms long enough for you to get out of bed without feeling like your head's been replaced with an anvil. On top of easing headaches and muscle pain, there's another reason these pills are good for hangovers: They may directly combat alcohol's inflammatory effects. But there's one over-the-counter painkiller you should never take while or after consuming alcohol, and that's Tylenol. Any drug that uses acetaminophen will only further abuse your recovering liver.

6. EGGS

The best way to tackle a hangover with food is to eat while you drink. Chowing down after the damage has already been done may distract you from your turmoil for a short while, but it won't soothe your physical symptoms. There are a few exceptions: Eggs, for example, have hangover-fighting potential thanks to a special ingredient. The food is packed with cysteine, an amino acid that breaks down the drinking byproduct acetaldehyde. So whether you prefer to enjoy brunch out or at home, make sure your meal includes eggs in some form.

7. HONEY ON TOAST

While you're at it, put some honey on toast next to your omelet. According to Britain's Royal Society of Chemistry, while it won't cure a hangover, the breakfast can help alleviate the symptoms: "The best breakfast is toast and honey (or golden syrup) which provides the body with the sodium, potassium, and fructose which it now needs." The BBC talked to a junior doctor about this hangover remedy and he recommended adding banana. While he cautions it's an acquired taste, the doctor explained, "Bananas are a high source of potassium—an electrolyte that gets depleted when you go out on the binge. The honey will give you that spike of sugar in your bloodstream and that energy rush to help you get back on your feet."

BONUS: DRINK LESS

While this is definitely the least helpful of all suggestions, in 2005 an article in the BMJ looked at 15 studies of hangover cures, noting that "the paucity of randomised controlled trials is in stark contrast to the plethora of ‘hangover cures' marketed on the internet." Their conclusion? "No compelling evidence exists to suggest that any conventional or complementary intervention is effective for preventing or treating alcohol hangover. The most effective way to avoid the symptoms of alcohol induced hangover is to practise abstinence or moderation."

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