The expansive Star Wars universe includes a head-spinning amount of vocabulary. Even if you're a hardcore fan, keeping up with all of the places, characters, objects, and jargon can be tough, especially when you factor in all of the second and third party references and products. The Los Angeles Times set out to clear things up. Using several verified sources, including the films themselves and the Lucasfilm Star Wars databank, the journalists recently published an extensive Star Wars Style Guide that is filled with useful facts for those who think they know the franchise, those who want to learn more, or those who want to feign expertise.

"Digging back into the George Lucas-created galaxy’s stories was a pleasure," Blake Hennon of the Times writes, "deciding what would or wouldn’t be included in the style guide was sometimes unpleasant. This was to be a handy, searchable guide for my colleagues, not a galactic encyclopedia." Check out a few cool tidbits included in Hennon's informative guide below and head to the Los Angeles Times website to see the entire list.

The correct way to spell Chewbacca's species is Wookiee, not Wookie.

Star Wars: The Force Awakens is the seventh film and seventh episode in the saga, but it's the eighth film in the overall franchise, which includes Star Wars: The Clone Wars (2008). Lucasfilm has not officially used "Episode VII" to refer to the film.

In the phrase "May the Force be with you," the "t" is not capitalized in "the," but the "f" is capitalized in "Force."

AT-AT is short for All Terrain Armored Transport, the Imperial vehicles that made an appearance in Star Wars: Episode V – The Empire Strikes Back (1980) during the Battle of Hoth.

The general term for a communication device is "comlink."

The band at Jabba the Hutt's palace in Return of the Jedi (1983) is called Max Rebo Band.

The untouched original versions of the original trilogy are only available as bonus discs in limited edition sets of the updated films.

Return of the Jedi won a special achievement award for visual effects at the 1984 Academy Awards.