Artist Gives Anatomy Textbook a Slick Makeover in Black and Gold

Emily Evans
Emily Evans

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Even for those who might find it a bit grim to display an anatomy book on their coffee table, it's hard to resist the allure of Emily Evans's Anatomy in Black. Illustrated entirely in black and gold, the new book combines science and art, setting it apart from other medical texts.

The tome has all the details and features of a normal anatomy text, with seven chapters each dedicated to an area of the human body: head and neck, back, upper limb, thorax, abdomen, pelvis, and lower limb. As informative as it is attractive, the book provides detailed information about each section of the body with elaborate double page spreads and over 250 gloriously crafted illustrations.

Evans had a wealth of knowledge to draw on while creating the book. She has a degree in Anatomy and Cell Biology, a career as a freelance medical illustrator for the last 12 years, and also teaches at universities in London and Cambridge.

"Anatomy in Black contains precise anatomical content. I wanted it to have the same level of content that I teach my medical students in the dissection room at Cambridge University," Evans told Street Anatomy. "Anatomy shouldn’t be intimidating nor should it be difficult to learn. I want people to be drawn to the book that aren’t just academics. Anatomy in Black bridges the gap between academic text and pop culture."

This sophisticated book is a perfect addition to any library, especially for artists and anatomy lovers. You can pick up a copy right here.

7 Supplies to Kickstart Your Bullet Journal Practice

iStock.com/PeopleImages
iStock.com/PeopleImages

Bullet journals are part planner, part calendar, and part to-do list—and you may have seen them on Instagram recently. While getting the hang of the method may take a couple tries (or weekly spreads), it helps to have the right tools to get you started. And if you're a devoted follower, you might be on the hunt to find supplies to make your journaling easier (and more enjoyable). Below we've collected just a few of our favorite products to help you take your journaling to the next level. And if you're looking for some new ideas to help you get the most out of your bullet journal, we've got you covered, too.

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1. Leuchtturm1917 Notebook

The cover of a black Leuchtturm1917 notebook
Leuchtturm1917, Amazon

Choosing a bullet journal notebook is ultimately a matter of personal preference, though many users go for ones with dots or lines to keep lists straight, and books that lay flat when open. The Leuchtturm1917 is especially popular for its blank table of contents, numbered pages, and durability. Plus, you can choose the size that fits best in your purse or bag, as well as from a variety of hues. The included stickers help when it comes time to archive your journal.

Find it on Amazon for $20.

2. Sakura Pigma Micron Pens

Five pens next to their respective line thicknesses
Sakura, Amazon

While artistic users go for crazy colors, it's best to start out with a simple, fine-tipped pen that won't bleed through your pages. The Pigma Micron pens from Sakura are great for strong but delicate writing that doesn't take up a ton of space. This set includes several different nib sizes, so you can experiment to find the one you like best. Plus, the archival ink is meant to stick around—great for when you're looking over bullet journals from years past.

Find them on Amazon for $11 or at these other retailers:

3. Rhodiarama Dot Notebook

A periwinkle blue notebook with an orange elastic band
Rhodia, Amazon

Slightly more advanced users might like the Rhodiarama Dot, which earns points for its durability, fancy leatherette cover, and the fact that you can weigh pages down with artwork and washi tape and still close the cover.

Find it on Amazon for $16.

4. Stabilo Fineliner Pens

A woman writes 'Party' on with Stabilo Fineliner pens
Stabilo, Amazon

If you want to add a little pizazz to your bullet journal, these colorful fine-tipped Stabilo pens from Europe are a perfect choice. The pocket size makes them easy to stash alongside your notebook.

Find them on Amazon for $9.

5. Moleskine Dotted Journal

The cover of a black Moleskine notebook
Moleskine, Amazon

The Moleskine journals are tried and true, and many bullet journalers like this dotted version. The dots are dark (but not too dark to interfere with your work) and the soft cover holds up like a champ.

Find it on Amazon for $12 and at these other retailers:

6. Tombow Brush Pens

Colorful Tombow pens
Tombow, Amazon

If you're the type who wants to add hand-lettering to your bullet journal (all the better for those Instagram snaps), you might already be familiar with these Tombow pens. They can help you achieve a watercolor effect, and work great for calligraphy.

Find them on Amazon for $16.

7. Poppin Soft Cover Notebook

A shiny silver notebook
Poppin

The Poppin notebooks include lined pages and a back cover, plus a variety of fashionable metallic covers that set them apart.

Find it at Poppin for $10 to $12 or at these other retailers:

7 Ways to Take Advantage of the Bullet Journal Method

iStock.com/Neustockimages
iStock.com/Neustockimages

If you haven't heard of the bullet journal, it's the productivity method du jour—one that combines the features of a planner, calendar, to-do list, diary, and more. It's not a specific product (although the founder of the method, Ryder Carroll, has created a special notebook for it) as much as a way of creating a journaling system that works for you.

Proponents say the method helps you focus your time and your goals, in part through periodic "migration" sessions that force you to review how you've been spending your days. And yes, it's popular on Instagram—because many bullet journalers have filled their notebooks with colorful flair. (But that part is entirely optional.)

While core components of the bullet journal system like monthly spreads and daily logs are great, many bullet journalers like to add other features that fit their own life. After all, the beauty of the method is the customization and flexibility. We've rounded up a few ideas for new and not-so-new bullet journalers alike to try.

1. Track—and fuel—your creative projects.

Let's say that, like most people, you have a day job. But at night, you're writing the next Great American Novel—or at least some short stories. You might get an idea related to one of those projects on your morning commute or while taking a walk in the park at lunch. There's no time to pull out the manuscript, and if you email yourself the idea it might get lost in a jumble of newsletters and other alerts.

Instead, just start a new page for the project in your journal, note it in your index, and scribble away. You can come back to it later, and fill in other, non-sequential pages in the journal as the mood strikes. Your journal probably isn't the best place to write whole stories, but it's perfect if you just had a mini-breakthrough you want to take down, or even as a way to keep track of potential prompts and inspiration.

2. Improve your habits.

Habit trackers are some of the most popular add-ons to the regular bullet journal time-oriented spreads. You can make yours cute—tracking the number of glasses of water you drink a day by coloring in a big glass, say—or more minimalist, perhaps by listing the habits you want to build (yoga, waking up early) on the left next to a chart of days and coloring in the days you manage to do the habit. You can also create a page just to log you often you do one particular thing—drinking alcohol, for example. Some people even use their bullet journals to track food and digestive symptoms, either by creating a section for a food journal or just noting in their daily log when they eat a certain food and how it makes them feel.

3. Save money.

You can create a custom spread for your monthly budget, track all your expenses, or just track your purchases in a particular category (say, eating out) if there's a particular type of spending you're trying to curb. The design can be as crafty as you like—whether you're coloring in bricks that represent each $50 saved toward a house or just filling in columns noting every time you make a purchase. The key is that, as with health habits, writing something down can serve as a powerful motivator and/or deterrent, since you know you'll have to come face-to-face with yourself at the end of the month.

4. Plan your meals.

Nothing combines health and finance goals quite like planning your meals. You can make your meal plan a section of your weekly spread: Carroll, the bullet journal's creator, likes to set up a list of meals on the left page of his notebook and a shopping list of ingredients on the right. Dividing the items by categories (like meat, produce, and pantry staples) can speed things up at the store, too. It's great to do this at home so you can check the fridge and see what you're missing. Then, when you're done shopping, note how much you spent at the bottom of the list. You can track that to develop insights about your grocery budget.

Over time, you can also create lists to help you with meal planning, perhaps "Favorite Weeknight Dinners," "Easy Work Lunches," etc. Some people also like to create a master grocery list of frequently bought items they can consult whenever they're at the store, just in case they forget to write staples down on their weekly shopping list.

5. Remember the good things.

In our flurry of to-do lists, project deadlines, and meal plans, it can be easy to forget about the things that brighten our days, whether it's an especially funny joke from a colleague or a milestone in a child's development. Create a "memories" page (don't forget to log it in your index!) where you record the great stuff that happens, and pull it out to reflect whenever you're having a gray day. Some bullet journalers like to put pages like this toward the back of their journals to separate them out from the time-oriented spreads. A memories page is also a great opportunity to bust out some thematic artwork.

6. Track your reading lists.

Another great way to encourage better habits is through a reading log. Like a memory log, many people like to put this toward the back of their journal, although ultimately the placement is totally up to you. You can keep track of all the books you read this year, perhaps with notes on what you thought of them—a definite resource when you're drawing up those year-end best-of lists to share with other reading pals!

7. Pair it with an app.

While the bullet journal is touted as "the analog method for the digital age," most of us don't want to go full-on analog. There's now an official companion app that will help you organize and search your old bullet journals, help you learn the method, offer prompts, and serve as a log for when you're away from your journal. It's designed as an addition to the journal, not a replacement, so you still need to put in that time with pen (or pencil, or watercolor brush) and paper.

Bullet journals also pair well with apps like Evernote—for example, you can use Evernote on your smartphone to snap photos of text you scrawl down to save digitally for later use. (Maybe those on-the-fly notes on your novel go into an Evernote notebook that you consult when you have a bit more time, for example.) That's a good option for longer-term projects that might span a couple notebooks.

Many people also use both bullet journals and an online calendar, using the latter for fixed events like birthdays and doctors appointments and the former as more of a way to time-block the day and focus on goals. After all, the beauty of the bullet journal is that unlike digital space, the paper in your notebook is finite—which helps you realize that so is your time and energy. That makes it easier to plan accordingly.

Ready to try it yourself? Check out our recommendations for the best products to get your bullet journal practice started.

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