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Frank Cho/Marvel Comics
Frank Cho/Marvel Comics

The Most Interesting Comics of the Week

Frank Cho/Marvel Comics
Frank Cho/Marvel Comics

Every week I write about the most interesting new comics hitting comic shops, bookstores, digital, and the web. Feel free to comment below if there's a comic you've read recently that you want to talk about or an upcoming comic that you'd like me to consider highlighting.

The Sheriff of Babylon

By Tom King and Mitch Gerads
DC Vertigo 


DC Comics is in the midst of launching 12 new titles to Vertigo, their mature readers imprint, hoping to breathe life into the once groundbreaking publishing line. The most promising of these new titles might just be Tom King and Mitch Gerad's The Sheriff of Babylon, which begins this week. Set in Iraq in 2003, it follows three characters looking to solve the murder of an Iraqi police recruit.

Tom King is a former counter-terrorism operations officer for the CIA who was stationed in Iraq, which is an experience he draws on for this comic. (King has said in interviews that he has to submit every issue to the CIA’s publication review board for approval.) This has been a breakout year for the writer whose other DC books, Omega Men and Grayson, allowed him to apply his knowledge of espionage and insurgencies to the world of superheroes.

Perhaps it’s how this comic explores the underworld of an embattled, post-war country, or the gritty realism of Mitch Gerads' artwork, but it’s hard not to draw comparisons to a great comic DC published in the early ‘00s called Winter Men. Fans of that series, which explored post-Cold War Russia through the eyes of a superhero-turned-policeman, will probably want to see what King and Gerads do here. Winter Men artist John Paul Leon is even providing the covers for this series.

The Abaddon

By Koren Shadmi
Z2 Comics 


Koren Shadmi’s The Abaddon was a webcomic that began in 2011, and it comes to print this week courtesy of indie publisher Z2 Comics. The compelling mystery reads like a dream: creepy, sexy and laden with cryptic meaning. It begins when a man named Ter, recently returned from an unnamed war and still bearing the bandages, attends an open house in an old, two-story apartment occupied by four roommates. Once he accepts their offer to live there, he finds that there is no way to actually leave, and what proceeds is like MTV's The Real World on an acid trip.

Since most of the action takes place inside the apartment (at least for the first half of the book), The Abaddon reads like a play. (It is loosely based on Jean-Paul Sartre’s existentialist play No Exit, about a group of people locked in a room that turns out to be hell.) The Abaddon deals with death, karma, and the afterlife, but it's not all that bleak. It will make you laugh as often as it makes you cringe. An Israeli cartoonist based in Brooklyn, Shadmi's expressive pencil drawings are reminiscent of the great animator Bill Plympton, and the tones of green and red he uses with them add to the unreal, dreamlike nature of the story. 

Totally Awesome Hulk #1

By Greg Pak, Frank Cho and Sonia Oback
Marvel Comics


As Marvel Comics comes back from the other side of their Secret Wars event, they have promised that everything will return “All New, All Different.” The most different of these returning comics may be the new Hulk series (now called Totally Awesome Hulk) which stars not Bruce Banner but Amadeus Cho, a teenage Korean-American “boy genius.” This is the latest move in Marvel’s attempt to diversify their A-list heroes, following the new female Thor and the African-American Captain America.

From the perspective of new storytelling opportunities, Bruce Banner as the Hulk had long ago lost his punch. There have been other Hulks recently like Rick Jones and Thunderbolt Ross, but none have added much interest to the concept. Amadeus Cho has been a popular supporting character in the series for a number of years and is a logical successor to Banner. He was created by writer Greg Pak who returns for this series along with fan-favorite artist Frank Cho (Liberty Meadows, Shanna the She-Devil).

Pak and Cho plan to bring a sense of humor and fun to the Hulk, a character that has become too often about joyless aggression and angst. The fact that Amadeus Cho can turn into the Hulk at will because he wants to, unlike Banner who always dreaded the transformation, is a nice wrinkle that readers looking to enjoy some good “Hulk Smash” might appreciate.

The End of a Fence

By Roman Muradov
kuš! 


Latvian publisher kuš! (pronounced “kush”) has been on a mission since 2007 to introduce comics to the adult reading audience in their home country through magazine anthologies like the eponymous kuš! and its sister-publication š! (pronounced "shh"). Before they came along, comics were unpopular in Latvia, but kuš! has been responsible for helping the medium by showcasing an international array of cartoonists, as well as some up and coming Latvian ones.

Now, kuš! is making the move into publishing graphic novels, and their first book is a beautiful little 100-page comic called The End of a Fence by Russian illustrator Roman Muradov (he currently lives in San Francisco). With a mixture of geometric shapes, brushy textures, pixelation, a beautifully soft color palette, and an almost alien-looking typeface, Muradov explores humanity’s relationship with technology in a way that is like watching a wonderfully designed graphical interface degrade and break apart.

This is Muradov’s second graphic novel, his first was the Ignatz-award nominated (In a Sense) Lost and Found. You can order a copy of The End of a Fence through the publisher.

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Pop Chart Lab
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entertainment
A Visual History of Captain America’s Shields
Pop Chart Lab
Pop Chart Lab

Captain America has gone through plenty of wardrobe changes since his comic book debut in 1941, but it’s his iconic shield that has had the most makeovers. Over the past eight decades, fans have seen the shield change its shape, color, and even the material from which it’s crafted. For the folks at Pop Chart Lab, the shield’s storied history provided the perfect subject matter for their latest poster.

On this piece, the company teamed with Marvel to give a rundown of 50 of Cap’s shields—from the instantly recognizable to the downright obscure. Here we see his classic Golden Age shield, with its slightly different color scheme, and the different variations from Jack Kirby’s time-traveling Bicentennial Battles book. Then there are entries like the vibranium shield he received from Black Panther in Captain America #342 and an adamantium one made by Tony Stark.

Those different shields just scratch the surface of the deep cuts Pop Chart Lab provides. There are also shields from Captain Americas across Marvel’s numerous alternate universes, like the ones used by the Ultimate Universe Steve Rogers and the android Cap from Earth-725.

Each shield is illustrated to match its comic book counterpart and comes with a description specifying the series it debuted in and which Earth it exists on (the Marvel Universe has thousands of different versions of Earth, after all).

The posters will begin shipping on May 23, and you can pre-order yours now starting at $29 on the Pop Chart Lab website. You can check out a full look at the poster below.

Pop Chart Lab's Captain America shield poster
Pop Chart Lab
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Marvel Studios
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Tony Stark's Original $325,000 Iron Man Suit Was Stolen from a Hollywood Warehouse
Marvel Studios
Marvel Studios

Tony Stark has defeated the likes of Spider-Man, The Incredible Hulk, and Magneto. But the industrialist/superhero is apparently no match for the person—or persons—who made off with the Iron Man suit Robert Downey Jr. sported in the original 2008 film, which is valued at approximately $325,000. As the Los Angeles Times reports, the LAPD is currently investigating the incident, which occurred at a Hollywood warehouse and was reported earlier this week. The theft itself, however, is assumed to have occurred sometime between February and April of this year, and was only discovered by chance. According to the Los Angeles Times:

“The famous red-and-gold suit, which first flashed across movie screens in the 2008 Iron Man film that kick-started Marvel's movie empire, was reported missing Tuesday, [Officer Christopher No, a spokesman for the Los Angeles Police Department] said. Employees at the warehouse ‘just happened to check’ Tuesday and noticed the costume was gone.”

Very few details were given; a spokesperson for the LAPD declined to name to whom the warehouse belonged, nor was it made clear who exactly reported the crime. Marvel, meanwhile, is directing any questions about the missing suit to Walt Disney Studios, and Disney did not immediately respond with a comment.

Sounds like a case for Jessica Jones.

[h/t: Los Angeles Times]

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